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Found 32 Books Published by The New Press — Book Cover Mosaic

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Click for more detail about 12 Angry Men: True Stories Of Being A Black Man In America Today by Gregory S. Parks and Matthew W. Hughey 12 Angry Men: True Stories Of Being A Black Man In America Today

by Gregory S. Parks and Matthew W. Hughey
The New Press (Jan 11, 2011)
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Called a book that "is factual yet reads like a novel" on the Huffington Post, 12 Angry Men reveals some pointed truths about our nation as a dozen African American authors from across the United States tell their personal stories of being racially profiled.

In this "extraordinarily compelling" (Publishers Weekly) book, we hear tales of injustice from Joe Morgan, a former Major League Baseball MVP; Paul Butler, a federal prosecutor; Kent, a devoted father hauled into central booking for trespassing and loitering when he visits his mother’s housing project; Solomon Moore, a former criminal justice reporter for the New York Times; and King Downing, a former head of the ACLU’s racial profiling initiative.

In an era of contentious debate about controversial police practices and, more broadly, the significance of implications of race throughout American life, 12 Angry Men is an urgent, moving, and timely book that exposes "a serious impediment to the collective American Dream of a colorblind society" (Pittsburgh Urban Media).

Book Review

Click for more detail about After the Storm: Black Intellectuals Explore the Meaning of Hurricane Katrina by David Dante Troutt After the Storm: Black Intellectuals Explore the Meaning of Hurricane Katrina

by David Dante Troutt
The New Press (Sep 30, 2007)
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Now in paperback on the second anniversary of Katrina, one of the few books to offer the perspectives of African Americans on the Gulf Goast tragedy.

Available for the first time in paperback after selling out its hardcover print run and being frequently named among the best of the Katrina books, After the Storm offers "angry, learned, focused, readable, [and] essential" writing, according to Library Journal, in which contributors face what Ebony magazine calls "questions about poverty, housing, governmental decision-making, crime, community development and political participation, which were raised in the aftermath of the storm."

Featuring the work of leading African American intellectuals, including Derrick Bell, Charles Ogletree, Michael Eric Dyson, Cheryl Harris, Devon Carbado, Adolph Reed, Sheryll Cashin, and Clement Alexander Price, After the Storm suggests "precisely what we must do if we are to both save the planet and create the great towns and cities that we can proudly bequeath to future generations" (Socialist Review).


Click for more detail about Art on My Mind: Visual Politics by bell hooks Art on My Mind: Visual Politics

by bell hooks
The New Press (Jul 01, 1995)
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In Art on My Mind, bell hooks, a leading cultural critic, responds to the ongoing dialogues about producing, exhibiting, and criticizing art and aesthetics in an art world increasingly concerned with identity politics. Always concerned with the liberatory black struggle, hooks positions her writings on visual politics within the ever-present question of how art can be an empowering and revolutionary force within the black community.


Click for more detail about Black Moses: A Novel by Alain Mabanckou Black Moses: A Novel

by Alain Mabanckou
The New Press (Jun 06, 2017)
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LONG-LISTED FOR THE MAN BOOKER INTERNATIONAL PRIZE

A rollicking new novel described as “Oliver Twist in 1970s Africa” (Les Inrockuptibles) from “Africa’s Samuel Beckett . . . one of the continent’s greatest living writers” (The Guardian).

It’s not easy being Tokumisa Nzambe po Mose yamoyindo abotami namboka ya Bakoko. There’s that long name of his for a start, which means, "Let us thank God, the black Moses is born on the lands of the ancestors." Most people just call him Moses. Then there’s the orphanage where he lives, run by a malicious political stooge, Dieudonn Ngoulmoumako, and where he’s terrorized by two fellow orphans—the twins Songi-Songi and Tala-Tala.

But after Moses exacts revenge on the twins by lacing their food with hot pepper, the twins take Moses under their wing, escape the orphanage, and move to the bustling port town of Pointe-Noire, where they form a gang that survives on petty theft. What follows is a funny, moving, larger-than-life tale that chronicles Moses’s ultimately tragic journey through the Pointe-Noire underworld and the politically repressive world of Congo-Brazzaville in the 1970s and 80s.

Mabanckou’s vivid portrayal of Moses’s mental collapse echoes the work of Hugo, Dickens, and Brian DePalma’s Scarface, confirming Mabanckou’s status as one of our great storytellers. Black Moses is a vital new extension of his cycle of Pointe-Noire novels that stand out as one of the grandest, funniest, fictional projects of our time.


Click for more detail about Black Popular Culture (Discussions in Contemporary Culture) by Michele Wallace Black Popular Culture (Discussions in Contemporary Culture)

by Michele Wallace
The New Press (Sep 01, 1998)
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A Village Voice Best Book "spirited debate among African American artists and cultural critics about issues from essentialism to sexuality"


Click for more detail about Black Power 50 by Sylviane A. Diouf and Komozi Woodward Black Power 50

by Sylviane A. Diouf and Komozi Woodward
The New Press (Sep 06, 2016)
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Black Power burst onto the world scene in 1966 with ideas, politics, and fashion that opened the eyes of millions of people across the globe. In the United States, the movement spread like wildfire: high school and college youth organized black student unions; educators created black studies programs; Black Power conventions gathered thousands of people from all walks of life; and books, journals, bookstores, and publishing companies spread Black Power messages and imagery throughout the country and abroad.The Black Arts Movement inspired the creation of some eight hundred black theaters and cultural centers, where a generation of writers and artists forged a new and enduring cultural vision.Black Power 50 includes original interviews with key figures from the movement, essays from today’s leading Black Power scholars, and over one hundred stunning images, offering a beautiful and compelling introduction to this pivotal movement.


Click for more detail about Black Stats: African Americans by the Numbers in the Twenty-first Century by Monique W. Morris Black Stats: African Americans by the Numbers in the Twenty-first Century

by Monique W. Morris
The New Press (Jan 28, 2014)
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Black Stats—a comprehensive guide filled with contemporary facts and figures on African Americans—is an essential reference for anyone attempting to fathom the complex state of our nation. With fascinating and often surprising information on everything from incarceration rates, lending practices, and the arts to marriage, voting habits, and green jobs, the contextualized material in this book will better attune readers to telling trends while challenging commonly held, yet often misguided, perceptions.

A compilation that at once highlights measures of incredible progress and enumerates the disparate impacts of social policies and practices, this book is a critical tool for advocates, educators, and policy makers. Black Stats offers indispensable information that is sure to enlighten discussions and provoke debates about the quality of Black life in the United States today—and help chart the path to a better future.

There are less than a quarter-million Black public school teachers in the U.S.—representing just 7 percent of all teachers in public schools.

Approximately half of the Black population in the United States lives in neighborhoods that have no White residents. In the five years before the Great Recession, the number of Black-owned businesses in the United States increased by 61 percent.

A 2010 study found that 41 percent of Black youth feel that rap music videos should be more political. There are no Black owners or presidents of an NFL franchise team. 78 percent of Black Americans live within 30 miles of a coal-fired power plant, compared with 56 percent of White Americans.


Click for more detail about Chokehold: Policing Black Men by Paul Butler Chokehold: Policing Black Men

by Paul Butler
The New Press (Jul 11, 2017)
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?The most readable and provocative account of the consequences of the war on drugs since Michelle Alexander’s The New Jim Crow . . . .”
?The New York Times Book Review

Cops, politicians, and ordinary people are afraid of black men. The result is the Chokehold: laws and practices that treat every African American man like a thug. In this explosive new book, an African American former federal prosecutor shows that the system is working exactly the way it’s supposed to. Black men are always under watch, and police violence is widespread—all with the support of judges and politicians.

In his no-holds-barred style, Butler, whose scholarship has been featured on 60 Minutes, uses new data to demonstrate that white men commit the majority of violent crime in the United States. For example, a white woman is ten times more likely to be raped by a white male acquaintance than be the victim of a violent crime perpetrated by a black man. Butler also frankly discusses the problem of black on black violence and how to keep communities safer—without relying as much on police.

Chokehold powerfully demonstrates why current efforts to reform law enforcement will not create lasting change. Butler’s controversial recommendations about how to crash the system, and when it’s better for a black man to plead guilty—even if he’s innocent—are sure to be game-changers in the national debate about policing, criminal justice, and race relations.


Click for more detail about Color Me English: Migration And Belonging Before And After 9/11 by Caryl Phillips Color Me English: Migration And Belonging Before And After 9/11

by Caryl Phillips
The New Press (Aug 09, 2011)
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Born in St. Kitts and brought up in the UK, bestselling author Caryl Phillips has written about and explored the experience of migration for more than thirty years through his spellbinding and award-winning novels, plays, and essays.

Now, in a magnificent and beautifully written new book, Phillips reflects on the shifting notions of race, culture, and belonging before and after the September 11 attacks on the World Trade Center.

Color Me English opens with an inspired story from his boyhood, a poignant account of a shared sense of isolation he felt with the first Muslim boy who joined his school. Phillips then turns to his years living and teaching in the United States, including a moving account of the day the twin towers fell. We follow him across Europe and through Africa while he grapples with making sense of colonial histories and contemporary migrations—engaging with legendary African, African American, and international writers from James Baldwin and Richard Wright to Chinua Achebe and Ha Jin who have aspired to see themselves and their own societies more clearly.

A truly transnational reflection on race and culture in a post-9/11 world, Color Me English is a stunning collection of writing that is at once timeless and urgent.


Click for more detail about Corruption by Tahar Ben Jelloun Corruption

by Tahar Ben Jelloun
The New Press (Nov 01, 1996)
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Casablanca and Tangier provide the backdrops for Corruption, and erotic tale of morality about Mourad, the last honest man in Morocco. After a lifetime of resistance, Mourad finally gives in to the demands of his materialistic wife and accepts “commissions” for his work: just one envelope stuffed with cash, then another. Ben Jelloun’s compelling novel evokes the dangers of succumbing to the daily temptations of modern life, as Mourad lives the consequences of betraying his existence.


Click for more detail about Corruption (International Fiction) by Tahar Ben Jelloun Corruption (International Fiction)

by Tahar Ben Jelloun
The New Press (Oct 01, 1995)
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Much to the chagrin of his boss, wife, and colleagues, scrupulously moral Mourad refuses to accept "commissions" for his work, until overwhelming pressures make him give in, with disastrous results.


Click for more detail about Daughters of the Dust: The Making of an African American Woman’s Film by Julie Dash Daughters of the Dust: The Making of an African American Woman’s Film

by Julie Dash
The New Press (Nov 01, 1992)
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In the winter of 1992, nearly one hundred years after motion pictures were invented, the first nationally distributed feature by an African American woman was released in the United States. The film tells the story of an African American sea-island family preparing to come to the mainland at the turn of the century. In her richly textured, highly visual, lyrical portrayal of the day of the departure, Julie Dash evokes the details of a persisting African culture and the tensions between tradition and assimilation. Daughters of the Dust: The Making of an African American Woman’s Film, which includes Dash’s complete screenplay, describes the story of her extraordinary sixteen-year struggle to complete the project.


Click for more detail about Don’t Believe The Hype: Still Fighting Cultural Misinformation about African Americans by Farai Chideya Don’t Believe The Hype: Still Fighting Cultural Misinformation about African Americans

by Farai Chideya
The New Press (Aug 01, 2017)
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First published in 1995, Farai Chideya’s Don’t Believe the Hype became an instant classic, filling an enormous gap in what was then an emergent field and going on to sell more than 50,000 copies. Chideya exposed the various ways that media bias created and upheld inaccurate and harmful stereotypes about African Americans, and she succeeded in debunking those myths with an accessible, thoroughly researched handbook, its title inspired by the famous Public Enemy song.Now, after achieving national fame as a respected commentator on NPR, CNN, and ABC News, Chideya returns to this seminal text, offering a completely revised and updated twentieth-anniversary edition. She once again exposes the persistent reality of media bias against black America, even as new media formats proliferate and diversity rises in newsrooms, on television, and in film. This new edition highlights biased news coverage of black athletes, disaster victims, and police violence, among other subjects, with updated statistical information offering accurate counterpoints. Now a new generation of readers can benefit from a fresh, frank approach to looking at race, media, power, and culture.


Click for more detail about Fatal Invention: How Science, Politics, And Big Business Re-Create Race In The Twenty-First Century by Dorothy Roberts Fatal Invention: How Science, Politics, And Big Business Re-Create Race In The Twenty-First Century

by Dorothy Roberts
The New Press (Jul 05, 2011)
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A decade after the Human Genome Project proved that human beings are not naturally divided by race, the emerging fields of personalized medicine, reproductive technologies, genetic genealogy, and DNA databanks are attempting to resuscitate race as a biological category written in our genes. In this provocative analysis, leading legal scholar and social critic Dorothy Roberts argues that America is once again at the brink of a virulent outbreak of classifying population by race. By searching for differences at the molecular level, a new race-based science is obscuring racism in our society and legitimizing state brutality against communities of color at a time when America claims to be post-racial.

Moving from an account of the evolution of race—proving that it has always been a mutable and socially defined political division supported by mainstream science—Roberts delves deep into the current debates, interrogating the newest science and biotechnology, interviewing its researchers, and exposing the political consequences obscured by the focus on genetic difference. Fatal Invention is a provocative call for us to affirm our common humanity.


Click for more detail about Hold Tight Gently: Michael Callen, Essex Hemphill, And The Battlefield Of Aids by Martin Duberman Hold Tight Gently: Michael Callen, Essex Hemphill, And The Battlefield Of Aids

by Martin Duberman
The New Press (Mar 18, 2014)
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In December 1995, the FDA approved the release of protease inhibitors, the first effective treatment for AIDS. For countless people, the drug offered a reprieve from what had been a death sentence; for others, it was too late. In the United States alone, over 318,000 people had already died from AIDS-related complications?among them the singer Michael Callen and the poet Essex Hemphill.

Meticulously researched and evocatively told, Hold Tight Gently is the celebrated historian Martin Duberman’s poignant memorial to those lost to AIDS and to two of the great unsung heroes of the early years of the epidemic.
Callen, a white gay Midwesterner who had moved to New York, became a leading figure in the movement to increase awareness of AIDS in the face of willful and homophobic denial under the Reagan administration; Hemphill, an African American gay man, contributed to the black gay and lesbian scene in Washington, D.C., with poetry of searing intensity and introspection.

A profound exploration of the intersection of race, sexuality, class, identity, and the politics of AIDS activism beyond ACT UP, Hold Tight Gently captures both a generation struggling to cope with the deadly disease and the extraordinary refusal of two men to give in to despair.


Click for more detail about Islam Explained by Tahar Ben Jelloun Islam Explained

by Tahar Ben Jelloun
The New Press (Apr 24, 2004)
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In an accessible question-and-answer format, Islam Explained clarifies the main tenets of Islam, the major landmarks in Islamic history, and the current politics of Islamic fundamentalism. The book also sheds light on the key words that have come to dominate the media—terrorist, crusade, jihad, fundamentalist, fatwa—offering lucid and balanced explanations, not only for youngsters but also for the general reader.Islam Explained is at once an essential introduction to one of the world’s great religions and a cry for tolerance and understanding in deeply troubled times.


Click for more detail about Possessing the Secret of Joy: A Novel by Alice Walker Possessing the Secret of Joy: A Novel

by Alice Walker
The New Press (May 06, 2008)
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From the author the New York Times Book Review calls “a lavishly gifted writer,” this is the searing story of Tashi, a tribal African woman first glimpsed in The Color Purple whose fateful decision to submit to the tsunga’s knife and be genitally mutilated leads to a trauma that informs her life and fatefully alters her existence. Possessing the Secret of Joy, out of print for a number of years, was the first novel to deal with this controversial topic and managed to do so in a manner that Cosmopolitan called “masterful, honorable, and unforgettable storytelling.” The New Press is proud to bring the book back into print with a new preface by the author addressing the book’s initial reception and the changed attitudes toward female genital mutilation that have come about in part because of this book.


Click for more detail about Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools by Monique W. Morris Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools

by Monique W. Morris
The New Press (Mar 29, 2016)
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“A powerful indictment of the cultural beliefs, policies, and practices that criminalize and dehumanize Black girls in America, coupled with thoughtful analysis and critique of the justice work that must be done at the intersection of race and gender.” —Michelle Alexander, author of The New Jim Crow

Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools is a discussion about the experiences of Black girls across the country whose intricate lives are misunderstood, highly judged—by teachers, administrators, and the justice system—and degraded by the very institutions charged with helping them flourish. This book shows how, despite obstacles, stigmas, stereotypes, and despair, Black girls still find ways to breathe remarkable dignity into their lives in classrooms, juvenile facilities, and beyond.


Click for more detail about Racism Explained to My Daughter by Tahar Ben Jelloun Racism Explained to My Daughter

by Tahar Ben Jelloun
The New Press (Jun 01, 1999)
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In the tradition of Marion Wright Edelman’s The Measure of Our Success, a bestselling author speaks frankly with his daughter about racism.


Click for more detail about Say It Loud: Great Speeches On Civil Rights And African American Identity by Catherine Ellis and Stephen Drury Smith Say It Loud: Great Speeches On Civil Rights And African American Identity

by Catherine Ellis and Stephen Drury Smith
The New Press (Aug 31, 2010)
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Say It Loud adds new depth to the oral and audio history of the modern struggle for racial equality and civil rights—focusing directly on the pivotal questions black America grappled with during the past four decades of resistance. With recordings unearthed from libraries and sound archives, and made widely available here for the first time, Say It Loud includes powerful speeches by Malcolm X, Angela Davis, Martin Luther King Jr., James Cone, Toni Morrison, Colin Powell, and many others.

Bringing the rich immediacy of the spoken word to a vital historical and intellectual tradition, Say It Loud illuminates the diversity of ideas and arguments pulsing through the black freedom movement.

Book Review

Click for more detail about Sundown Towns: A Hidden Dimension Of American Racism by James W. Loewen Sundown Towns: A Hidden Dimension Of American Racism

by James W. Loewen
The New Press (Sep 29, 2005)
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The explosive story of racial exclusion in the north, from the American Book Award-winning author of Lies My Teacher Told Me

As American as apple pie:
• Most suburbs in the United States were originally sundown towns.
• As part of the deepening racism that swept through the United States after 1890, town after town outside the traditional South became intentionally all-white, evicting their black populations with tactics that ranged from intimidation to outright violence.
• From Myakka City, Florida, to Kennewick, Washington, the nation is dotted with thousands of all-white towns that are (or were until recently) all-white on purpose. Sundown towns can be found in almost every state.

"Don’t let the sun go down on you in this town." We equate these words with the Jim Crow South but, in a sweeping analysis of American residential patterns, award-winning and bestselling author James W. Loewen demonstrates that strict racial exclusion was the norm in American towns and villages from sea to shining sea for much of the twentieth century.

Weaving history, personal narrative, and hard-nosed analysis, Loewen shows that the sundown town was—and is—an American institution with a powerful and disturbing history of its own, told here for the first time. In Michigan, Indiana, Ohio, Illinois, Missouri, Pennsylvania, and elsewhere, sundown towns were created in waves of violence in the early decades of the twentieth century, and then maintained well into the contemporary era.

Sundown Towns redraws the map of race relations, extending the lines of racial oppression through the backyard of millions of Americans—and lobbing an intellectual hand grenade into the debates over race and racism today.

Book Review

Click for more detail about The Cushion In The Road: Meditation And Wandering As The Whole World Awakens To Being In Harm’s Way by Alice Walker The Cushion In The Road: Meditation And Wandering As The Whole World Awakens To Being In Harm’s Way

by Alice Walker
The New Press (Apr 09, 2013)
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This gorgeous collection gathers Alice Walker’s wide-ranging meditations?many of them previously unpublished?on our intertwined personal, spiritual, and political destinies. For the millions of her devoted fans, and for readers of Walker’s bestselling 2006 book, We Are the Ones We Have Been Waiting For, here is a brand new "gift of words" that invites readers on a journey of political awakening and spiritual insight.

The Cushion in the Road finds the Pulitzer Prize?winning novelist, poet, essayist, and activist at the height of her literary powers, sharing fresh vantages and a deepening engagement with our world. Walker writes that "we are beyond a rigid category of color, sex, or spirituality if we are truly alive," and the pieces in The Cushion in the Road illustrate this idea beautifully. Visiting themes she has addressed throughout her career?including racism, Africa, Palestinian solidarity, and Cuba?as well as addressing emergent issues, such as the presidency of Barack Obama on health care, Walker explores her conflicting impulses to retreat into inner contemplation and to remain deeply engaged with the world.

Rich with humor and wisdom, and informed by Walker’s unique eye for the details of human and natural experience, The Cushion in the Road will please longtime Walker fans as well as those who are new to her work.


Click for more detail about The Darker Nations: A People’s History Of The Third World (New Press People’s History) by Vijay Prashad The Darker Nations: A People’s History Of The Third World (New Press People’s History)

by Vijay Prashad
The New Press (Jan 01, 2007)
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Click for more detail about The Lights of Pointe-Noire: A Memoir by Alain Mabanckou The Lights of Pointe-Noire: A Memoir

by Alain Mabanckou
The New Press (Mar 01, 2016)
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Alain Mabanckou left Congo in 1989, at the age of twenty-two, not to return until a quarter of a century later. When he finally came back to Pointe-Noire, a bustling port town on Congo’s southeastern coast, he found a country that in some ways had changed beyond recognition: the cinema where, as a child, Mabanckou gorged on glamorous American culture had become a Pentecostal temple, and his secondary school has been renamed in honor of a previously despised colonial ruler.

But many things remain unchanged, not least the swirling mythology of Congolese culture that still informs everyday life in Pointe-Noire. Now a decorated writer and an esteemed professor at UCLA, Mabanckou finds he can only look on as an outsider in the place where he grew up. As he delves into his childhood, into the life of his departed mother, and into the strange mix of belonging and absence that informs his return to Congo, his work recalls the writing of V.S. Naipaul and Andr Aciman, offering a startlingly fresh perspective on the pain of exile, the ghosts of memory, and the paths we take back home.


Click for more detail about The Monkey Suit: And Other Short Fiction on African Americans and Justice by David Dante Troutt The Monkey Suit: And Other Short Fiction on African Americans and Justice

by David Dante Troutt
The New Press (Apr 01, 1999)
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The Monkey Suit is David Dante Troutt’s “impressive” debut (Kirkus), a collection of short stories inspired by historic legal cases involving African Americans in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The Monkey Suit addresses issues ranging from Jim Crow segregation ordinances to warrantless private property searches in stories the Washington Post calls “quietly devastating.” Troutt brilliantly combines legal scholarship with literature in a book that Claude Brown calls “truly a work of genius.”


Click for more detail about The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness  by Michelle Alexander The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness

by Michelle Alexander
The New Press (Jan 16, 2012)
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Once in a great while a book comes along that changes the way we see the world and helps to fuel a nationwide social movement. The New Jim Crow is such a book. Praised by Harvard Law professor Lani Guinier as "brave and bold," this book directly challenges the notion that the election of Barack Obama signals a new era of colorblindness.

With dazzling candor, legal scholar Michelle Alexander argues that "we have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it." By targeting black men through the War on Drugs and decimating communities of color, the U.S. criminal justice system functions as a contemporary system of racial control—relegating millions to a permanent second-class status, even as it formally adheres to the principle of colorblindness.

In the words of Benjamin Todd Jealous, president and CEO of the NAACP, this book is a "call to action."

Book Review

Click for more detail about The World Has Changed: Conversations with Alice Walker by Alice Walker The World Has Changed: Conversations with Alice Walker

by Alice Walker
The New Press (Nov 08, 2011)
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Published to stellar praise, The World Has Changed boasts revelatory conversations between Walker and other literary and cultural icons—including Howard Zinn, Pema Chdrn, Claudia Tate, Margo Jefferson, William R. Ferris, and Paula Giddings—and illuminates the heart and mind of one of the world’s most celebrated living writers. Carefully framed and contextualized through an introduction by literary scholar Rudolph P. Byrd, the book also includes a thorough chronology of Walker’s life and work.

The World Has Changed is a delightful addition to the Alice Walker canon that will thrill and engage readers for years to come.

Book Review

Click for more detail about The World Will Follow Joy: Turning Madness Into Flowers (New Poems) by Alice Walker The World Will Follow Joy: Turning Madness Into Flowers (New Poems)

by Alice Walker
The New Press (Apr 02, 2013)
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"Poetry is leading us," writes Alice Walker in The World Will Follow Joy. In this dazzling collection, the beloved writer offers over sixty new poems to incite and nurture contemporary activists. Hailed as a ?lavishly gifted writer” (The New York Times), Walker imbues her poetry with evocative images, fresh language, anger, forgiveness, and profound wisdom. Casting her poetic eye toward history, politics, and nature, as well as to world figures such as Jimmy Carter, Gloria Steinem, and the Dalai Lama, she is indeed a "muse for our times" (Amy Goodman).

By attentively chronicling the conditions of human life today, Walker shows, as ever, her deep compassion, profound spirituality, and necessary political commitments. The poems in The World Will Follow Joy remind us of our human capacity to come together and take action, even in our troubled political times. Above all, the gems in this collection illuminate what it means to live in our world today.


Click for more detail about This Blinding Absence of Light: A Novel by Tahar Ben Jelloun This Blinding Absence of Light: A Novel

by Tahar Ben Jelloun
The New Press (May 01, 2002)
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An immediate and critically acclaimed bestseller in France and winner of the 2004 International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award, This Blinding Absence of Light is the latest work by Tahar Ben Jelloun, the first North African winner of the Prix Goncourt and winner of the 1994 Prix Mahgreb. Ben Jelloun crafts a horrific real-life narrative into fiction to tell the appalling story of the desert concentration camps in which King Hassan II of Morocco held his political enemies under the most harrowing conditions. Not until September 1991, under international pressure, was Hassan’s regime forced to open these desert hellholes. A handful of survivors—living cadavers who had shrunk by over a foot in height—emerged from the six-by-three-foot cells in which they had been held underground for decades.Working closely with one of the survivors, Ben Jelloun eschewed the traditional novel format and wrote a book in the simplest of language, reaching always for the most basic of words, the most correct descriptions. The result is a shocking novel that explores both the limitlessness of inhumanity and the impossible endurance of the human will.


Click for more detail about Up South: Stories, Studies, and Letters of African American Migrations by Malaika Adero Up South: Stories, Studies, and Letters of African American Migrations

by Malaika Adero
The New Press (Apr 01, 1994)
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Perhaps the greatest migration in America’s history is the early twentieth-century movement of African Americans from the southern states to the urban Northeast and Midwest. For the first time ever, Up South captures the totality of this pivotal black experience in a single volume. Including photographs, letters, and turn-of-the-century items in the Chicago Defender, Crisis, and Opportunity, as well as writing by Zora Neale Hurston, James Weldon Johnson, Ralph Ellison, Richard Wright, Arna Bontemps, Mary McLeod Bethune, and W.E.B. Du Bois, Up South is a moving and eye-opening anthology of African American literature, scholarship, and journalism from the first half of this century.


Click for more detail about We Are the Ones We Have Been Waiting for: Inner Light in a Time of Darkness by Alice Walker We Are the Ones We Have Been Waiting for: Inner Light in a Time of Darkness

by Alice Walker
The New Press (Nov 21, 2007)
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A New York Times bestseller in hardcover, Pulitzer Prize winner Alice Walker’s We Are the Ones We Have Been Waiting For was called “stunningly insightful” and “a book that will inspire hope” by Publishers Weekly.Drawing equally on Walker’s spiritual grounding and her progressive political convictions, each chapter concludes with a recommended meditation to teach us patience, compassion, and forgiveness. We Are the Ones We Have Been Waiting For takes on some of the greatest challenges of our times and in it Walker encourages readers to take faith in the fact that, despite the daunting predicaments we find ourselves in, we are uniquely prepared to create positive change.The hardcover edition of We Are the Ones We Have Been Waiting For included a national tour that saw standing-room-only crowds and standing ovations. Walker’s clear vision and calm meditative voice—truly “a light in darkness”—has struck a deep chord among a large and devoted readership.


Click for more detail about We Are the Ones We Have Been Waiting for: Inner Light in a Time of Darkness by Alice Walker We Are the Ones We Have Been Waiting for: Inner Light in a Time of Darkness

by Alice Walker
The New Press (Oct 30, 2006)
Format: Hardcover, Age Range: 
Read Detailed Book Description


A New York Times bestseller in hardcover, Pulitzer Prize winner Alice Walker’s We Are the Ones We Have Been Waiting For was called ?stunningly insightful” and ?a book that will inspire hope” by Publishers Weekly.

Drawing equally on Walker’s spiritual grounding and her progressive political convictions, each chapter concludes with a recommended meditation to teach us patience, compassion, and forgiveness. We Are the Ones We Have Been Waiting For takes on some of the greatest challenges of our times and in it Walker encourages readers to take faith in the fact that, despite the daunting predicaments we find ourselves in, we are uniquely prepared to create positive change.

The hardcover edition of We Are the Ones We Have Been Waiting For included a national tour that saw standing-room?only crowds and standing ovations. Walker’s clear vision and calm meditative voice—truly "a light in darkness"—has struck a deep chord among a large and devoted readership.









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