64 Books Published by Africa World Press & The Red Sea Press on AALBC — Book Cover Collage

Click for more detail about Dialectics Of Liberation: The African Liberation Support Movement by Abdul Alkalimat Dialectics Of Liberation: The African Liberation Support Movement

by Abdul Alkalimat
Africa World Press (Mar 01, 2022)
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The Dialectics of Black Liberation: The African Liberation Support Committee is a study that analyses the important ideological debates (Marxism and Nationalism), anti-imperialist social movements, and support for African liberation. Over four key years grass roots organizing was the basis for a vibrant national movement. The key concepts developed for each year include the following: 1972 United Front, 1973 Black Liberation, 1974 Class Struggle, and 1975 World Revolution. In sum, the book ends with a section on legacy and lessons for the movements of the 21st century.

An intriguing and valuable look at the work of the African Liberation Support Committee(ALSC). Abdul Alkalimat draws on original documents, news clippings, speeches and first-hand knowledge to tell the remarkable history of ALSC …Thousands of Black people provided crucial support to African liberation movements and freedom at home. This is a must-read for 21st century activists. —Howard Fuller (Owusu Sadaukai), Distinguished Professor, Founder of ALSC

Abdul Alkalimat captures an important historical period of transition within the US Black liberation movement. Support for the African anti-colonial struggles led activists to an anti-capitalist orientation, and important progress in developing movement cadre. —Saladin Muhammad, Black Workers for Justice

Dialectics of Liberation is a book I didn’t know I was waiting for. Alkalimat has offered new generations of organizers committed to Black liberation, socialism and revolutionary internationalism a wonderful and indispensable historical summation. —N’Tanya Lee, National Secretary, Left Roots

Dr. Alkalimat’s research is thorough. His analysis is insightful. His storytelling is complete. He demonstrates that the domestic quest by Black people in America for freedom was and will be inextricably tied to the struggle of African people throughout the world. —Gene Locke, Houston Attorney, Former Chair of ALSC

Alkalimat is a premier activist- scholar of the BLM, having participated at the highest levels in the formation and operation of ALSC. His encyclopedic and first-hand knowledge of the events and personalities of the Movement is reinforced by a magnificent trove of original source materials and documents. —William Sales, author of From Civil Rights to Black Liberation: Malcolm X and the Organization of Afro-American Unity


Click for more detail about Dialectics Of Liberation (paperback): The African Liberation Support Movement by Abdul Alkalimat Dialectics Of Liberation (paperback): The African Liberation Support Movement

by Abdul Alkalimat
Africa World Press (Mar 01, 2022)
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The Dialectics of Black Liberation: The African Liberation Support Committee is a study that analyses the important ideological debates (Marxism and Nationalism), anti-imperialist social movements, and support for African liberation. Over four key years grass roots organizing was the basis for a vibrant national movement. The key concepts developed for each year include the following: 1972 United Front, 1973 Black Liberation, 1974 Class Struggle, and 1975 World Revolution. In sum, the book ends with a section on legacy and lessons for the movements of the 21st century.

An intriguing and valuable look at the work of the African Liberation Support Committee(ALSC). Abdul Alkalimat draws on original documents, news clippings, speeches and first-hand knowledge to tell the remarkable history of ALSC …Thousands of Black people provided crucial support to African liberation movements and freedom at home. This is a must-read for 21st century activists. —Howard Fuller (Owusu Sadaukai), Distinguished Professor, Founder of ALSC

Abdul Alkalimat captures an important historical period of transition within the US Black liberation movement. Support for the African anti-colonial struggles led activists to an anti-capitalist orientation, and important progress in developing movement cadre. —Saladin Muhammad, Black Workers for Justice

Dialectics of Liberation is a book I didn’t know I was waiting for. Alkalimat has offered new generations of organizers committed to Black liberation, socialism and revolutionary internationalism a wonderful and indispensable historical summation. —N’Tanya Lee, National Secretary, Left Roots

Dr. Alkalimat’s research is thorough. His analysis is insightful. His storytelling is complete. He demonstrates that the domestic quest by Black people in America for freedom was and will be inextricably tied to the struggle of African people throughout the world. —Gene Locke, Houston Attorney, Former Chair of ALSC

Alkalimat is a premier activist- scholar of the BLM, having participated at the highest levels in the formation and operation of ALSC. His encyclopedic and first-hand knowledge of the events and personalities of the Movement is reinforced by a magnificent trove of original source materials and documents. —William Sales, author of From Civil Rights to Black Liberation: Malcolm X and the Organization of Afro-American Unity


Click for more detail about Pan-African Connections by Carole Boyce-Davies and N’Dri Thérèse Assié-Lumumba Pan-African Connections

by Carole Boyce-Davies and N’Dri Thérèse Assié-Lumumba
Africa World Press (Oct 01, 2021)
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Pan-African Connections brings to the reader a combination of Reflections and Testimonies from writers, politicians, activists, colleagues; with essays on intellectual activism, the building of Pan-African institutions and the voices of women in Panafricanism. Stories abound from writers such as Ngugi wa Thiong’o and Anyang’ Nyong’o about Locksley Edmondson, who is featured here, who like Walter Rodney, lived and worked on the African continent physically, but also engaged it politically, culturally and intellectually in teaching and research. The lives and work of these scholars embodied precisely the bringing together of African, Caribbean and African-American Studies in the intellectual arena. Through this generation of intellectual/activists, the rubric of Panfricanism remains one of the key areas of academic and political inquiry in Africana Studies.


Click for more detail about Conversations with Cornel West by Teodros Kiros with Cornel West Conversations with Cornel West

by Teodros Kiros with Cornel West
Africa World Press (Jan 21, 2021)
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Join us in a conversations with Cornel West, at Harvard Bookstore on March 8, 2021


These interviews deftly highlight…the life and thought of Cornel West. Teodros Kiros, one of our leading living philosophers, novelists, television personalities, and commentators on modern African life, brilliantly weaves together a series of dialogues that novices and experts of West’s work alike will find invaluable. The questioning of Kiros and responses of West encourage us to meditate on the meaning of A Love Supreme from the heart, which the Ethiopian thinker Zara Yacob maintained is the site of reason. —Neil Roberts, Professor of Political Science, Williams College

Cornel West defines himself as “a bluesman in the life of the mind, and a jazzman in the world of ideas.” Conversations with Cornel West demonstrates the truth of that self-description as he engages in Socratic dialogue with Teodros Kiros, a scholar who not only understands the importance of rigor, but who possesses a fund of knowledge that is broad in scope and analytic in precision. There is no one-upmanship in this shared critical space. —George Yancy, PhD, Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of Philosophy at Emory University,


Click for more detail about Sasinda Futhi Siselapha (Still Here): Black Feminist Approaches to Cultural Studies in South Africa’s Twenty-Five Years Since 1994 by Derilene (Dee) Marco, Tiffany Willoughby-Herard, and Abebe Zegeye Sasinda Futhi Siselapha (Still Here): Black Feminist Approaches to Cultural Studies in South Africa’s Twenty-Five Years Since 1994

by Derilene (Dee) Marco, Tiffany Willoughby-Herard, and Abebe Zegeye
Africa World Press (Jan 01, 2021)
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Sasinda and Futhi Siselapha (Still Here) is a fearless new interdisciplinary collection of contemporary criticism in the arts and humanities by scholars working on contemporary South Africa. Authors examine the period after the legal end of apartheid across genre and with an eye toward the study of culture. Derilene (Dee) Marco studies the cinematic legacies of Coetzee’s Disgrace; Sharlene Khan explores the hateful art criticism that has become the norm in response to Black and women of color artists; Natalia Molebatsi theorizes about the poetry scene and its aesthetics and ethics of healing across generations; Zethu Cakata examines the injuries caused by unenforced post 1994 language policies; Ashraf Jamal analyzes how “African” is African art and Bhavisha Panchia offers a provocative argument for the use of laughter, humor and play as anticolonial political ethical strategies; Peter Hudson scrutinizes the colonial unconscious reproducing itself through capitalist property relations in the present; and Robert Muponde and Abebe Zegeye write about the legacies of "white writing.” The book closes with creative writing on Winnie Mandela’s prison memoir curated by Natalia Molebatsi and Jeanne Scheper and Willoughby-Herard’s reflection on the present. From June Jordan to T. Obinkaram Echewa to Sibongile Khumalo to Mary Rahube, poetry, song, fiction, photography, new media, and drama offer us an ongoing and spirit-filled struggle with potential victory.

This book is an important contribution to the study of culture in the new dispensation in South Africa and beyond. With a keen attention to the meanings of race, class, and gender the authors take up questions of representation and reparation in the face of ongoing structural and institutional forms and practices of violence.


Click for more detail about The 5th Little Girl: Soul Survivor of the 16th Street Baptist Church Bombing by Tracy Snipe with Sarah Collins Rudolph The 5th Little Girl: Soul Survivor of the 16th Street Baptist Church Bombing

by Tracy Snipe with Sarah Collins Rudolph
Africa World Press (Nov 24, 2020)
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Once described by the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. as “one of the most tragic and vicious crimes ever perpetrated against humanity,” the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Alabama, instantly killed Addie Mae Collins, Carol Denise McNair, Carole Rosamond Robinson, and Cynthia Dionne Morris Wesley on September 15, 1963. This egregious act of domestic terrorism reverberated worldwide. It also sparked the passage of landmark civil rights legislation and a notable artistic response, signified by the jazz musician John Coltrane’s elegiac composition, “Alabama.”

Orchestrated by white supremacists, the blast left twelve-year-old Sarah Collins temporarily blind. For decades, she slipped into anonymity. In this intimate first-hand account, Sarah imparts her views on topics such as the 50th year commemoration, restitution, and racial terrorism. This story also delves into the bond between Sarah and her mother, Mrs. Alice Collins. In the backdrop of a national reckoning and global protests, underscored by the deadly violence at Mother Emanuel in Charleston, SC, and tragedies in Charlottesville, VA, and Pittsburgh, PA, Sarah’s unflinching testimony about the ‘63 Birmingham church bombing is illuminating.


Click for more detail about Maasai: A Novel of Love, War and Witchcraft in 19th Century East Africa by Elliot Fratkin Maasai: A Novel of Love, War and Witchcraft in 19th Century East Africa

by Elliot Fratkin
Africa World Press (Nov 05, 2020)
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This novel is based on true events of the 19th century, a period of widespread warfare between pastoralist groups fighting for grazing lands and cattle. The fiercest of these groups were the Laikipiak Maasai who dominated Kenya s Great Rift Valley until their defeat in the 1870s. The novel focuses on two lovers, Maron and Endelepin and their son Kitoip, as they endure the tribulations of warfare, smallpox, slave traders and the coming of European colonialism.


Click for more detail about Five Nights Before the Summit by Mukuka Chipanta Five Nights Before the Summit

by Mukuka Chipanta
Africa World Press (Jan 01, 2020)
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It is 1979. The first Commonwealth Heads of Government Summit on African soil is due to take place in Zambia, and graced by Queen Elizabeth herself. Barely a week before this much anticipated event, a white British couple, Henry and Laura Hinckley, are brutally killed on their farm on the outskirts of the capital city, Lusaka. The unknown perpetrators are at large, their motive unclear. Fearing a media backlash, the British government applies pressure on the Zambian authorities to bring the culprits to book, threatening to cancel the Queen’s trip altogether – a move that would result in huge embarrassment for the Zambian government.

Detective Maxwell Chanda, head of the Special Crimes Investigative Unit, is the man tasked with leading the investigation. He is a wise, steady hand but will he be able to piece together the seemingly disparate evidence in just five days? Will he be able to hold firm under the intense political pressure which insists on putting expediency above accuracy?

Five Nights Before the Summit offers a rich tapestry of context and character in a story that engages the reader in the pursuit of justice.


Click for more detail about One Shoe Marching Towards Heaven by Bro. Yao One Shoe Marching Towards Heaven

by Bro. Yao
Africa World Press (Jan 01, 2020)
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The title, One Shoe Marching Towards Heaven, is a koan. Koans function as teaching tools in the Zen tradition for monks working towards enlightenment. The Koans presented here strive to capture the simple voice of African-American wisdom speakers in a form that defies the boundaries of our literature. The numerical arc of the koans corresponds to the I-Ching. This book connects African-American culture with Asian culture. Though China is not referenced in the book, Chinese culture and wisdom functions as third rail of cultural infra-structure that informs much of the work. 

This is a book that is somehow about heaven. Heaven within the I-Ching is the place above, and location of the Creative. Earth is the place of the receptive. Heaven and Earth work together towards balance. Heaven is not a destination in the afterworld. It is an active force in everyday life working with the forces of earth towards balance. It is humans in between earth that play out the will and work of the cosmos.


Click for more detail about Ngũgĩ in the American Imperium by Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o and Timothy J. Reiss (editor) Ngũgĩ in the American Imperium

by Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o and Timothy J. Reiss (editor)
Africa World Press (Jan 01, 2020)
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This collection on Ngũgĩ’s work and the reach of his thinking chiefly within the US and areas of its closest hegemony joins artists, activists, critics, and scholars (often the same) from the Caribbean through North America to Hawai‘i. All have been deeply touched by Ngũgĩ’s artistic, critical and political work, and testify to his being perhaps the “symbol” of radical political and artistic exchanges between Africa and America (and the West generally) and how that readily expands to global transcultural dialogue (as his own chapter attests).

The chapters, together and singularly, track his hopeful but not naïve path from decolonizing the mind (defusing the “cultural bomb” that is colonizing’s obliteration of names, languages, cultures, and homeland bonds) to balancing cultures as equal knots in the mesh of an evenly-woven global net, then to finding and making ties and exchanges in a global dialogue. For some, this means seeing how Ngũgĩ’s novels sap and alter “traditional” (Western) ideas and aims of the novel in particular and fictive imagination in general (what in the West takes such forms as “literature,” “art,” “aesthetics”...).

Most explore his impact (often in their own artistic, political, and scholarly work) on ideas and practices of language and culture; of decolonization of minds and bodies and personal, social, and ecological well-being; of education and new non-hierarchical and transcultural pedagogies; of savagely centered social and political control (at their extreme, US and other carceral regimes) and decolonized freedoms for individuals and populations.

The start lies in refusing murderous economies of the slave trade, colonization, and neoliberal exploitation and contest. The ongoing lies in creative ecologies of exchange, circulation, and the knotted equalities, compassion and knowings of the infinite variety of the world’s cultures. For what threads all these chapters is that Ngũgĩ’s exile in the US has led him to develop one of the most potent conceptions of how a truly global reality of transcultural exchange among equal communities (what he now calls globalectics) may actively come to exist.


Click for more detail about The Golden Apple: Changing the Structure of Civilization  Vol. 3 by Edgar J. Ridley The Golden Apple: Changing the Structure of Civilization Vol. 3

by Edgar J. Ridley
Africa World Press (Dec 13, 2019)
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This book, the third in the author’s series examining the impact of symbols on human behavior, boldly corrects the record on the interpretation of James George Frazer’s classic work, The Golden Bough. Frazer presented how symbolism affects humanity from beginning to end, and Edgar Ridley author takes on Frazer’s critics, such as A.B. Cook and Theodore Gaster.

In this volume, the author reminds the reader that symptomatic thought and behavior have shaped every aspect of the genome and has controlled how genes operate throughout the world. Our understanding of genetics and its importance in human life and the changes that we have made throughout the world is based on the event of what the author labels the ‘neurological misadventure of primordial man’. This book describes how Symptomatic behavior and the dynamics of symbolic behavior is the cause of how genes operate in our bodies and how they express themselves in who we are and how we behave.

Edgar Ridley maintains for all time that symptomatic behavior will last forever as a catalyst for behavior transformation that will lead to the solving of the world’s most perplexing problems, including the conflicts that we face, the health problems that we endure, which issues are built primarily around racism and religion, causing health disparities and military conflict. According to the author, those problems and the human condition that affect the quality of life can only be solved by changing the mindset that produces symbolic behavior.


Click for more detail about The Golden Apple: Changing the Structure of Civilization, The Evidence of Symptomatic Behavior - Vol. 2 by Edgar J. Ridley The Golden Apple: Changing the Structure of Civilization, The Evidence of Symptomatic Behavior - Vol. 2

by Edgar J. Ridley
Africa World Press (Aug 15, 2016)
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This book, the second in a three-volume series, shows the destructive nature that symbolic thought has on civilization and the need for a transition to symptomatic thought and behavior.

Ridley demonstrates how the experts in the cognitive sciences, including all fields of anthropology, misrepresent the way symbols affect the neurological processes of the human brain. The author shows that the traditional belief that symptoms are inferior to symbols is erroneous, and that this belief has caused unspeakable cruelty and conflict the world over.

Ridley reaffirms his original thesis that man suffered a neurological misadventure in prehistory that caused the beginning of symbolic behavior. Symbolic thinking, a learned behavior, is not innate to the neurological processes of the brain, and must be eliminated.

The author has combed through the literatures of the world to show the reader how James Frazer’s Golden Bough and Cheikh Anta Diop’s Civilization or Barbarism inform the discussion of human behavior from antiquity to modern man. Frazer illustrated how symbol systems caused humans to not only mythologize each other, but human history, in a way that the great Senegalese scholar, Cheikh Anta Diop, called "the most monstrous falsification in the history of mankind."

"Edgar J. Ridley provides a detailed explanation of the differences between symbolic behavior and symptomatic thought processes and examines their implications for political and social order. His argument that symbols have historically-and even contemporaneously-been used or misused to advance causes inimical to society, for example, racist or religious bigotry, is one that should elicit deep reflection and prompt public policies that foster economic and political inclusivity in an era of globalization. His emphatic preference for symptomatic behavior as a tool for promoting greater harmony is consistent with efforts to promote regional stability and global peace and security."
—Ejeviome Eloho Otobo, formerly Director and Deputy Head of the Peacebuilding Support Office at the United Nations Headquarters in New York, is currently Non-Resident Senior Expert for Peacebuilding and Global Economic Policy at the Global Governance Institute, Brussels


Click for more detail about The Ethiopian Orthodox Tawahido Church (UK) by Ephraim Isaac The Ethiopian Orthodox Tawahido Church (UK)

by Ephraim Isaac
The Red Sea Press (Jun 13, 2013)
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Ethiopia is an extraordinary symbol of continuity amid a restive and crisis-ridden world. In a few decades, Africa has passed from colonialism, to modernity, to a congress of now largely independent black powers, whose views and votes are at long last heeded on the floor of the global parliament of nations. The capital of Ethiopia is also the headquarters of both the United Nations mission to the continent and of the indigenous continental African union.

Ethiopia is unique, not only in the antiquity of her continuous religious and political history, but also in the ever accelerating involvement of the nation in the problems and the promises of continent where religious belief is nevertheless more radically diversified. The sanctions of peace, hospitality, and wisdom in the line of biblical King Solomon is a symbol of continuity, order, and resoluteness alike for the community of nations, for the continent of Africa, and for the church and citizenry of Ethiopia itself.

This book sketches the history of the Ethiopian Orthodox Tawahido Church and also that of Christianity as a whole in Ethiopia. As the reader will discover, not only are there strong Biblical Hebraic elements in the theology, political theory, and liturgical calendar of the Ethiopian Church but there is also a strong influence from Beta Israel and Ethiopian Jews. Besides these Ethiopian Jews and of course, the Orthodox Ethiopians and a few Protestant and roman Catholic Ethiopian Christians, there are in Ethiopia also very large numbers of Moslems and various native beliefs. We hope other volumes will follow on these equally important Ethiopian religious traditions.

"A very comprehensive analysis of the history, tenets, organisation and influence of the Ethiopian Orthodox Church by a renowned authority on the subject. We are all indebted to Professor Ephraim Isaac for this important new contribution to Biblical and Ethiopian Studies. It is fascinating to learn, from Professor Ephraim, that Ge’ez, or classical Ethiopic, was one of the first seven languages of the ancient world to receive the holy scriptures."
-Professor Richard Pankhurst


Click for more detail about The Roots of Nubian Christianity Uncovered (UK) by Salim Faraji The Roots of Nubian Christianity Uncovered (UK)

by Salim Faraji
Africa World Press (Oct 11, 2012)
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This title answers the questions of how and why ancient Nubia converted to Christianity between the 4th and 6th centuries CE, demonstrating that a little-known 5th century ruler Silko inaugurated the beginnings of Christianity in his country, rather than it arriving as a result of Byzantine Missions in the 6th century CE.


Click for more detail about House of Slaves & “Door of No Return”: Gold Coast by Edmund Abaka House of Slaves & “Door of No Return”: Gold Coast

by Edmund Abaka
Africa Research and Publications (Dec 01, 2011)
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Though the pyramids of Egypt, the obelisks of Ethiopia and the stone walls of Zimbabwe are some of the remarkable historical structures in Africa, none of them quite capture the intricate connections between African and global history as the slave castles of Modern Ghana do. More than forty-five castles, forts and dungeons dotted the two hundred and fifty mile coastline of the Gold Coast (Modern Ghana) in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Grim and foreboding in their appearance, these castles and dungeons have become eternal coastal signposts of a disturbing past. They have long been remembered as the place where victims of the slave trade were imprisoned before their forced transportation to the New World. They personify the slave trade in all of its grim realities: estrangement, brutality and degradation. Here, in these "ships at permanent anchor," victims of the slave trade spent days and months in agony before their perilous and uncertain voyage to the New World.

Ghana’s slave forts and castles formed an integral part of the Middle Passage. Yet, they have received very scant scholarly attention. House of Slaves is a multi-layered historical study of the slave forts and castles of the Gold Coast that focuses on the people who worked in these slave castles. The book seeks to unravel the interplay between people and structures in the facilitation of the Atlantic Slave Trade on the West African coast. Life in the slave castles mirrored the conditions aboard slave ships on the Atlantic: starvation and disease. A better understanding of the West African dimension of the trans-Atlantic Slave trade; the creation of the early African diaspora in the Americas, the West Indies and Europe, and the "reconnections" between Africa and its global diaspora, since the 1990s, should begin from a textured analysis of the activity, memory and symbolism that these coastal ships at permanent anchor embody in African history and the history of the African Diaspora."

Here is a solid book on the forts and castles of Ghana that presents to us, with creativity and innovation, their history, significance, and legacy. Abaka fuses memory with history to remind us of the cruel past, to encourage us to remake our world in positive ways, and to adorn our humanity with positive values and concerns for the poor and marginalized.
—Toyin Falola, Distinguished Teaching Professor, The University of Texas at Austin and Mwalimu Nyerere Chair of Modern African Studies-At-Large, Benue State University Nigeria

Over 30 forts and castles on the coast of Ghana offer mute, but powerful testimony to the importance of the Atlantic slave trade. Edmund Abaka tells their story, writing not only about the architecture, but also about the economic and cultural exchanges that took place there, the suffering African slaves experienced within them, and their importance today as sites of memory.
—Martin Klein, Professor Emeritus, Department of History University of Toronto

This outstanding work is part of The Harriet Tubman Series of Africa World Press


Click for more detail about Garvey, Garveyism, and the Antinomies of Black Redemption by C. Boyd James Garvey, Garveyism, and the Antinomies of Black Redemption

by C. Boyd James
Africa World Press (Jan 21, 2009)
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In this copiously researched book, C. Boyd James charts and analyzes significant features of the legend of Marcus Mosiah Garvey and attempts to situate Garvey and Garveyism within the perspectives of his age. Prof. James posits that from the eighteenth century onwards, several ideologies of black liberation and redemption were spawned in the geography of the Atlantic. In Haiti, the proposition was actualized in full scale revolution while Brazil, Jamaica, and the United States witnessed approximately two hundred years of unrelenting rebellion. The aftermath of the American Revolution, and the crystallization of “white supremacy” gave rise to a new wave of ideologies, beginning with the dominant theme of “Back to Africa,” promoted by Martin E. Delaney. This theme remained constant throughout the American Civil War and until the Great Depression of 1893 – 1897.

Thereafter, there emerged a new group of spokesmen, with a shift from “Back to Africa” to “Africa for the Africans at Home and Abroad” with Marcus Mosiah Garvey and his Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA) as its chief proponent. This new ideology, in its temporal essence, was not determined by the materialist principle of the social relations of production, but by an absolute divine ordination of “race particularity” and “race absolutism”. It was one of the new racial ideologies, demarcated by reason and freedom that subsumed the centrality of the individual and gave priority to the group and the State, making as though it was absolutely true and necessary.

“Africa for the Africans at Home and Abroad” was a conservative articulation of freedom and liberty by “the excluded” in which God took center stage, governing the universe by His relationship with each race, at a specific time, at a specific place, at a distinct moment in history. Marcus Mosiah Garvey was the leading ideologist and practitioner. The UNIA was not a “Back to Africa” movement but a divinely ordained imperialist teleology driven by an exilic sense of purposefulness. In its absolute meaning, God’s governance follows “a natural order and rights of things.”

Within the body of the deliberations in Garvey, Garveyism and the Antinomies in Black Redemption Prof. James has shed considerable light on many salient issues central to the subject matter, along with providing new insights into questions with which others have already grappled, thereby affording another opportunity toward improving our understanding of the connection between human agents of history and the environment in which their historical mission is played out.


Click for more detail about John Henrik Clarke And The Power Of Africana History: Africalogical Quest For Decolonization And Sovereignty by Ahati N. N. Toure John Henrik Clarke And The Power Of Africana History: Africalogical Quest For Decolonization And Sovereignty

by Ahati N. N. Toure
Africa World Press (Dec 02, 2008)
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In the late 1960s through the late 1980s, the late John Henrik Clarke (1915-1998) was one of the foremost architects of the emerging discipline of Africana Studies/Africology as Professor of African World History in the Department of Black and Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter College of the City University of New York and as the Carter G. Woodson Distinguished Visiting Professor of African History at Cornell University’s Africana Studies and Research Center. The study explores Clarke s development and conceptualization of African World History by examining his intellectual influences and training, his approach to teaching African World History, his notions regarding African agency and African humanity, his explorations of themes of Pan Africanism and national sovereignty, his ideas concerning the relevance of African culture in historical perspective, and his legacy in African intellectualism and culture, including his contribution to the Afrocentric paradigm that is the core of the discipline of Africana Studies/Africalogy. As an academician and intellectual, Clarke emerged as one of the leading theorists of African liberation and the uses of African history as a foundation and grounding for liberation. Under Clarke s formulation liberation was defined not simply as freedom from European domination, but fundamentally as the restoration of African sovereignty. He explored history s utility in moving an oppressed and subordinated people from a position of subjugation on multiple levels to full status as a self-sustaining, self-defining, self-directed, free, and independent people on a global stage. Further, the study examines the influence of indigenous African intellectualism in the United States in African cultural and intellectual history. Although a leader among European academy-trained African intellectuals who join the European academy largely beginning in the 1970s, Clarke s education and training were the product of a movement for the indigenization of African academic intellectualism in Harlem of the 1930s that can be traced back to the early nineteenth century. It is the first extensive critical examination of Clarke as an exemplar of indigenous intellectualism in African culture in the United States.


Click for more detail about Afro-Mexicans: Discourse of Afro-Mexicans: Discourse of "Race" and Identity on the African Diaspora. by Chege Githiora

by Chege J. Githiora
Africa World Press (Nov 01, 2008)
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This study of conditions under which contact between Native Americans, Africans and Europeans took place in the New World underscores the case for further research into Afro-Hispanic encounters, and the African’s adaptation and contribution to the language and culture of the New World society.


Click for more detail about The Golden Apple: Changing the Structure of Civilization - Vol. 1 by Edgar J. Ridley The Golden Apple: Changing the Structure of Civilization - Vol. 1

by Edgar J. Ridley
Africa World Press (Jun 01, 2008)
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"With The Golden Apple: Changing the Structure of Civilization, author Edgar Ridley offers readers an extended look at the need for mankind to abandon its historical dependence on destructive symbols and the shackles of symbolic thinking once and for all in favor of the liberating Symptomatic Thought Process. The focus of The Golden Apple: Changing the Structure of Civilization is a contribution and celebration of the passion he feels for the positive benefits of the Symptomatic Thought Process as perhaps the last hope for mankind of reversing the destructive historical trends of a civilization with symbolic thinking as its DNA."
—Ronald R. Sims, Ph.D., Floyd Dewey Gottwald Senior Professor, Mason School of Business, College of William and Mary

"Having spent the better part of the past four decades in the medical profession I found the messaging in this book to be powerful and broadly applicable to not only the practice of medicine but also the myriad of other professions that comprise society. I encourage the readers of this book to carefully take the thoughts proposed herein and apply them broadly to their life practices."
—Domenic A. Sica, M.D., Professor of Medicine and Pharmacology, Virginia Commonwealth University

In praise of An African Answer: The Key to Global Productivity, also by Edgar J. Ridley

“It is a great book.”
—W. Edwards Deming

“Symptomatic thinking may well be the answer to the world’s problems.”
—Eric Watkins, African Business Magazine


Click for more detail about Marcus Garvey: Anti-Colonial Champion by Rupert Lewis Marcus Garvey: Anti-Colonial Champion

by Rupert Lewis
Africa World Press (Feb 01, 2008)
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This biography of Marcus Garvey documents the forging of his remarkable vision of pan-Africanism and highlights his organizational skills in framing a response to the radical global popular upsurge following the First World War. Central to Garvey’s response was the development of organizations under the umbrella of the Universal Negro Improvement Association and African Communities League, which garnered the transnational support of several million members and sympathizers and challenged white supremacist practices and ideas.

Garvey established the ideological pillars of twentieth-century pan-Africanism in promoting self-determination and self-reliance for Africa’s independence. Although Garvey travelled widely and lived abroad in New York and London, he spent his early years in Jamaica.

Rupert Lewis traces how Garvey’s Jamaican formation shaped his life and thought and how he combated the British colonial authorities as well as fought deep-rooted self-doubt and self-rejection among Jamaican black people. Garvey’s much neglected political and cultural work at the local level is discussed as part of his project to stimulate self-determination in Africa and its diaspora.


Click for more detail about Ruined by “Race”: Afro-Caribbean Missionaries and the Evangelization of Southern Nigeria, 1895-1925 by Waibinte E. Wariboko Ruined by “Race”: Afro-Caribbean Missionaries and the Evangelization of Southern Nigeria, 1895-1925

by Waibinte E. Wariboko
Africa World Press (Sep 18, 2006)
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The transition from the episcopate of Bishop S. A. Crowther to that of Bishop H. Tugwell in the Niger Mission was marked by sociopolitical and economic problems around the end of the nineteenth century. In addition to the problems posed by the separation of the Niger Delta Pastorate Church under Archdeacon D.C. Crowther, the Niger Mission was also faced with an acute shortfall in its workforce due in large part to the loss of its traditional Sierra Leone supply market for African missionaries. As a result, Tugwell turned to the West Indies for the recruitment of black West Indians for service in Southern Nigeria. Informed by the notion of racial affinity between black West Indians and West Africans, Tugwell and his allies in the Caribbean and London required the former to make Africa their home so that they could be perceived and rewarded like African agents. However, because the idea involved a substantial devaluation in the material benefits to be derived from missionary service, the black West Indians vigorously objected to the proposal.

They wanted instead to be perceived and rewarded as foreigners on the same footing as Europeans. Unresolved tensions over status and identity, including the redistribution of scarce resources, ultimately led to the premature collapse of the scheme. This book, among other things, explores the connection between the socioeconomic interests of the West Indians and their construction and representation of race in the Niger Mission. By refusing to make Africa their home, for example, they were rejecting the popular notion that race-belonging was a precondition for the sociopolitical and cultural transformation of Africa an idea popular among those who believed in the essentialist notion of race in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century: Tugwell and his allies in London and the Caribbean, including those black activists, scholars and publicists who advocated for the back-to-Africa movement in the New World such as Wilmot Edward Blyden, Albert Thorne, Henry Turner, Alexander Crummell, and Marcus Garvey. The overall conclusion is that the factors influencing how we construct identity and represent race are largely dependent on our desires for example, the desire for recognition or status, association or affiliation, and economic empowerment.


Click for more detail about Hurling Words At Consciousness by Mũkoma wa Ngũgĩ Hurling Words At Consciousness

by Mũkoma wa Ngũgĩ
Africa World Press (Jul 01, 2006)
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“By turns soothingly tender or implacably harsh, Hurling Words at Consciousness is an unflinching meditation on our globalized inequities. It is thoughtful and richly rewarding.” —Tejumola Olaniyan, University of Wisconsin-Madison “Mukoma wa Ngugi is a poet of extraordinary expressive gifts. This impressive volume casts a critical yet forgiving eye on closely-observed episodes from life in the United States, with knowing glances towards poets as diverse as Le’opold Se’dar Senghor and Matthew Arnold. The social concerns of an African poet in sympathy with political struggles throughout the Third World here jostle up against and defamiliarize the details of North American everyday life, which then suddenly take on new significance.” —Nicholas Brown, University of Illinois at Chicago “While treating the reader to an expansive range of themes - death, war, life, love, nature, human relationships/encounters, personal reflections, art, politics, history, social justice, revolution and others Mukoma wa Ngugi also succeeds in making a deeply profound, artistic statement. He decorates his intensely reflective utterance with a lacework of images, metaphors and other forms of figurative expression that reveal a keen artist at his craft. With this first volume of poetry, Mukoma wa Ngugi has clearly entered the world of published poets in style!” —Micere Mugo Githae, Syracuse University “Like his late mentors, Frantz Fanon and Walter Rodney, Mukoma is a catalyst, a circuit board, a generator. Through his writings and activism, he expresses the idea within which many will think change, the dream within which many will envision change, and the hope within which many will imagine change.” —Meredith Terreta, LeMoyne College


Click for more detail about My Mother Who is Me: Life Stories of Jamaican Women In New York by Jacqueline Bishop My Mother Who is Me: Life Stories of Jamaican Women In New York

by Jacqueline Bishop
Africa World Press (Jun 09, 2006)
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Book by Bishop, Jacqueline


Click for more detail about Eros Muse: Poems & Essays by Opal Palmer Adisa Eros Muse: Poems & Essays

by Opal Palmer Adisa
Africa World Press (Mar 15, 2006)
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Eros Muse examines the love affair between the poet and her muse. Personifying the muse as her ultimate, possessive lover, the poet explores what it means to be a writer. The essays are more pragmatic in tone and approach and explore the dual role of mother and writer. Yet the poems are more flirtatious, a dance of language and process, a prance, a trot, a sweeping waltz in which the poet and language shimmy across the room. “Not only is this book a series of essays, poems, and journals from one of the Americas most talented and prolific authors, but a virtual how-to manual for those who have to juggle the tasks of writing with those of parenting. Opal Palmer Adisa succeeds, wonderfully.” —Ishmael Reed, Poet & MacArthy Fellow “In Eros Muse, the Jamaican-born Opal Palmer Adisa explores and celebrates motherhood, sexuality, ‘the orgasmic rapture of writing,’ and language itself right on down to parts of speech. By asserting that ‘the poem is a seed in quest of the sun,’ Adisa makes her point: the word remains a procreative force in which she, for one, takes pleasure.” — Al Young, Poet Laureate of California “Opal, whose elders ‘lived life with a robust intensity that tingled [her] to the core,’ does not lessen that familial fury in these poems & essays, cannily meshing sacred rites de passion with the secular/cultural rights of her Caribbean/World cosmos. Her consummate poetics & sensual commitments—in defiance of a storm of ‘norm/s’—do indeed ‘tingle us to the core.’” —Eugene Redmond, Poet Laureate of East Saint Louis, Illinois; Editor of Drumvoices Revue “Opal Palmer Adisa turns within herself to conjure up some of the external/internal events and experiences that culminated in her becoming a writer. She describes her first stories composed while hiding in tall grasses and her growing efforts to address issues of cultural imperialism, her love of words, and her appreciation of the ‘vibrant energy of her people.’” —Jayne Cortez, Poet


Click for more detail about Ricekeepers: A Play by Rashidah Ismaili Ricekeepers: A Play

by Rashidah Ismaili
Africa World Press (Feb 01, 2006)
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Ricekeepers is a full-length play in eleven scenes, with ten characters, two of whom double up, and a dancer. Set in the Nimba, a village in a Guinee Coast country, the play centers around historical events of the past, particularly a massacre in the village of Nimba where the farmers are most noted for their rice culture. The Keeper of the Seeds, a female elder, who refuses to sell or give rice to the French during WW2, is beheaded as she attempts to protect the rice harvest and seeds. Her head is never found and because tradition calls for all to be returned to The Creator whole, her assistants continue the ritual of growing rice but never stop grieving for her. The scene shifts to a more recent date in Nimba where a civil war rages and the current Rice Mother is living as a displaced person in the city. By chance, she meets the director of refugees, also an African translator, who as a young soldier came to the village forty years earlier to demand the rice harvest for the soldiers. The play deals with colonialism, betrayal, tradition, gender issues, impotence and continuity. It is woman-centered because rice-growing is female work, and the duty of the Rice Mother is to maintain the seeds for planting, conserving of rice for food and locating the sites for growing rice. The ritual of dance and the mask are important elements in the play, especially because the mask embodies the past and predicts the future.


Click for more detail about From A Red Zone: Critical Perspectives on Race, Politics & Culture by Patricia Penn Hilden From A Red Zone: Critical Perspectives on Race, Politics & Culture

by Patricia Penn Hilden
Africa World Press (Dec 02, 2005)
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This collection of essays explores several sites of racialized power, from scholarly works embedded in academic disciplines to “ethnic” museums and several race-based exclusionary political practices. The point of view is comparative—that of a woman of color feminist—and that of one born into a “red zone,” the world of urban Native America in the second half of the twentieth century. Arguing that the experiences of indigenous peoples—as subjects of museum display, anthropological investigation, and history writing, as well as those whose communities have provided both cultural commodities for mass consumption and exemplars for performative appropriation—often overlap those experienced by other racialized communities ( primarily within the United States, Africa, and the Caribbean), this work offers a wide-ranging analysis of several symbolic and political regimes of racial and gender power. Polemical in tone, the essays are each grounded in an historical consciousness specific to communities of color in the contemporary U.S.


Click for more detail about Living in Babylon: Poems and Performances by Esther Iverem Living in Babylon: Poems and Performances

by Esther Iverem
Africa World Press (Nov 15, 2005)
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Esther Iverem’s new collection of poems is a wide-ranging meditation that proves the adage that the personal is political, and the political is profoundly personal. As an active member of DC Poets Against the War, she is a member of a new generation of poets actively engaged in speaking truth to power in a new era of global empire. Praise for Iverem’s The Time: Portrait of a Journey Home: "Iverem is one of a growing cohort of young poets whose inaugural volumes promise that 21st century African American literature will be both brilliant and incendiary—in the tradition. …There is a fresh and refreshing sensibility at work in her poetry. …With such a heart, with such a voice as Esther Iverem’s, we’re bound to win.” —Lorenzo Thomas, African American Review “Exuberant…Iverem’s poems do more than just embrace the political. Her book is a document which describes just how entwined the personal and political are for African Americans in this country.” -Robyn Selman, New York Newsday "Esther Iverem … is one of the light-bearers, committed to an aesthetic of innovation, justice, and struggle. Her words bite, purr, snarl, scream, shout, spit, soar, sing and hit with the skilled ferocity of a master martial artist. You don’t quite know what hit you." —Fred Ho, Composer and Bandleader Blurbs on recent work: ”Most moving”—DC Indy Media “Remarkable”—Sarah Browning, DC Poets Against the War


Click for more detail about Beautiful. And Ugly Too by MK Asante Beautiful. And Ugly Too

by MK Asante
Africa World Press (Oct 10, 2005)
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Beautiful. And Ugly Too, the critically-acclaimed, second poetry collection from award-winning author M.K. Asante, Jr., reveals through its delicate rhythm, the plurality of being alive. The poems, sketched from influences and drawn from experiences around the world, are colorful comments on the human condition. "A thought provoking journey down the lonely road of wisdom and whiplash." —John Mitchell, Los Angeles Times “Sensitive yet iconoclastic! His words channel ancestral resistance.” — Bruce George, Co-founder of Def Poetry Jam “A vivid, yet carefully constructed meditation on reality Beautiful and Ugly Too is a timely dissection of twentieth-century isms through verse… life and all of her blemishes reflected through a collage of eloquent vignettes.” —Jazmyn Martin, Philadelphia Tribune


Click for more detail about And the Girls in Their Sunday Dresses: Four Works by Zakes Mda And the Girls in Their Sunday Dresses: Four Works

by Zakes Mda
Africa World Press (Jul 01, 2005)
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Two very different women meet during a long wait to buy subsidized rice and discover they have more in common than their poverty; an old man and a child share a last loving waltz; a cynical, disabled gangster learns humanity from a committed social worker, and a young girl finds her missing father and her role in the political struggle. This collection of stage plays, one radio play and a cinepoem, captures the essence of Zakes Mda’s method as a dramatist- a slow but intimate process of revelation (on the part of the characters). It is an artistic cooperation of the most pleasurable kind.


Click for more detail about Decolonizing the Academy: African Diaspora Studies by Carole Boyce-Davies Decolonizing the Academy: African Diaspora Studies

by Carole Boyce-Davies
Africa Research and Publications (Mar 30, 2005)
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Click for more detail about Faith of Our Fathers: An Examination of the Spiritual Life of African and African-American People by Mumia Abu-Jamal Faith of Our Fathers: An Examination of the Spiritual Life of African and African-American People

by Mumia Abu-Jamal
Africa World Press (Jan 01, 2004)
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FAITH OF OUR FATHERS: An Examination of the Spiritual Life of African and African-American PeopleMumia Abu-JamalFrom the founding legends of Abyssinia’s royal house to the hidden "hush harbors" of black captives in the America’s southland, Mumia Abu-Jamal presents a moving portrayal of black faith over thespan of 500 years.In this book, his first work of history, the acclaimed essayist pens a probing panorama of the spiritual life of African people, who, dispensed from their motherland, molded alove of freedom into religious practice andresistanceto racist tyranny.
"Mumia Abu Jamal has always embodied both political courage and moral commitment to his people and to all humanity. That deep spiritual vision is richly reflected inFaith of Our Fathers. For one who has been unjustly imprisoned for so many years to retain faith is remarkable enough in itself. Butto produce such a work of stunning insight and thoughtful research, as Mumia has done, is truly inspiring."—Manning Marable, Professor of Public Affairs, Political Science and History, Director, Institute for Research in African-American Studies"Mumia Abu-Jamal’s Faith of Our Fathers captures black religion’s ambiguity and complexity. Well-researched and lucidly written, his insights rest onsound scholarly judgment…this book is a creative engagement by onewho knows existentially what it means tosearch for freedom in chains."—Fromthe Preface by James H. Cone, Briggs Distinguished Professor, Union TheologicalSeminary "From his death row cell in Pennsylvania, Mumia Abu-Jamal bursts free here, showing the same stamina and wisdomof the ancestors of spirit he so movingly portraysin this new book. He and hisbook witness to spirit that matters spirit surviving slavery and prison, spirit celebrating love and life, spirit still fightingfor justice."—Mark L. Taylor, Professor of Theology & Culture, PrincetonTheological SeminaryMumia Abu-Jamal writes quite literally from"the Valley ofthe Shadow of Death" and has wonawards and a vast readership for his gripping essays from prison. As he fights for his own freedom, Abu-Jamal writes passionately about the freedom struggles of millions throughout history. He is the authorof the best-selling Live from Death Row, Death Blossoms, and AllThings Censored. ’ 1-59221-019-8 (paper) $19.95Theology/AFRICAN AMERICAN
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Click for more detail about Cantata for Jimmy by Rashidah Ismaili Cantata for Jimmy

by Rashidah Ismaili
Africa World Press (Dec 01, 2003)
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"There is quietness in this poetry that reflects deepness past its own use! Or it seems that way. Rashidah lines up the words to make statements of memory, exhilaration, passion, with a casual formality, as if she thought about that. Sometimes she is searching for openings so her deeper self can be heard. Sometimes it is that feeling that wandering, wondering attention, which she impresses herself, is an actual Rashidah. But poets rarely understand everything. Those that do are dangerous. They might carry guns and stuff like the Billy the Kid aesthetic, or they might carry memories and puncture the quietness of life passing for too many without a cry and puncture that flatness with poetic reflection.


Click for more detail about Like Water Running Off My Back: Poems by MK Asante Like Water Running Off My Back: Poems

by MK Asante
Africa World Press (Jul 01, 2002)
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This collection of poetry is a window into the mind and soul of a young poet intent on searching for the "truth in everything." Molefi Asante, Jr. writes in the tradition of African American poets who have laid a foundation that is rich in culture and rhythm. With poems covering a wide range of themes, such as identity, relationships, and family, his poems reveal the intense sensibilities of a young poet.


Four Plays

by Zakes Mda
Africa World Press (Dec 01, 2000)
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Click for more detail about The Mother of Us All: A History of Queen Nanny, Leader of the Windward Jamaican Maroons by Karla Lewis Gottlieb The Mother of Us All: A History of Queen Nanny, Leader of the Windward Jamaican Maroons

by Karla Lewis Gottlieb
Africa World Press (Jul 01, 2000)
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Maths Action Plans is a series of four books for Years 4-6/P5-7, offering flexible, supportive teacher and pupil resources and coherent coverage of the five strands of the Framework for Teaching Mathematics. The series provides inspiring, flexible activities that can be fitted into any maths scheme. Each title contains: clear learning objectives, linked to the Framework for Teaching Maths, the National Curriculum Programme of Study and the 5-14 National Guidelines for Mathematics; lesson plans with up to three levels of differentiation; supplementary activities for consolidation or linked work; and suggestions for the application of ICT skills.


Click for more detail about Towards the African Renaissance: Essays in Culture and Development, 1946-1960 by Cheikh Anta Diop Towards the African Renaissance: Essays in Culture and Development, 1946-1960

by Cheikh Anta Diop
Africa World Press (Jan 01, 2000)
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Diop wrote a series of essays as a student from 1946 to 1960, charting the development of Africa. The essays, which are seen as a form of blueprint, are collected here, in book form, Towards the African Renaissance: Essays in Culture and Development, 1946-1960.


Click for more detail about She Plays with the Darkness by Zakes Mda She Plays with the Darkness

by Zakes Mda
Africa World Press (Oct 01, 1999)
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In a remote mountain village in Lesotho, the beautiful Dikosha lives for dancing and for song, setting herself apart from her fellow villagers. Her twin brother, Radisene, works in the lowland capital of Maseru, struggling amid political upheaval to find a life for himself away from the hills. As the years pass, Radisene’s fortunes rise and fall in the city, while Dikosha remains in the village, never leaving and never aging. And through it all, the community watches, comments, and passes judgment.


Click for more detail about Black Spirituality and Black Consciousness: Soul Force, Culture and Freedom in the African-American Experience by Carlyle Fielding Stewart, III Black Spirituality and Black Consciousness: Soul Force, Culture and Freedom in the African-American Experience

by Carlyle Fielding Stewart, III
Africa World Press (Jan 01, 1999)
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Contrary to some misguided perceptions about the religion of black folk, African-American Spirituality plays a vital role in the formation and practice of black freedom in American. While social and political freedom are important quests in the African-American experience of freedom, black Americans have managed to created a unique experience of freedom that embraces black spirituality and black culture as essential elements for building personal identity consolidating community and determining their destiny. This freedom has also created a unique cultural archive of the black culture soul which shapes the consciousness and values of black Americans as a people of God of inherent worth and power who have surmounted the relentless storms of adversity.

Black spirituality affirms, negates and transcends aspects of Anglo-American culture, creates and sustains African-American culture and establishes psychological and spiritual relocation in response to oppression and various systems of devaluation in American society.

A central thesis of this book is that African-American spirituality, by the way it shapes, informs and strengthens black life, creates a unique matrix of freedom that accentuates the power, resiliency and creativity of black people as the means of overcoming their plight. At the heart of this paradigm of freedom is the courage to create and construct a positive reality which has enabled Africans to develop a spiritual gift of resourcefulness that compels to identify, define, confront and transform those forces of evil and oppression that have instigated their demise.

Thus the creation of a culture of spirituality and a spirituality of culture through creative and resistant soul force. And cultural creativity has aided the sanity, survival and well-being that has also contributed to a practice of freedom emulated in the world community.


Click for more detail about Barrel of a Pen: Resistance to Repression in Neo-Colonial Kenya by Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o Barrel of a Pen: Resistance to Repression in Neo-Colonial Kenya

by Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o
Africa World Press (Feb 01, 1997)
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This book is a collection of essays by the prominent Kenyan novelist and playwright, Ngugi wa Thiong’o. These collected essays vigorously respond to the atmosphere of repression and domination in Kenya. Ngugi argues that the defense of national culture and national identity is central in the overall struggle against regimes of repression and imperialist domination.

This thesis was tested on the ground by Kenyan cultural workers and activists who, in collaboration with peasants and workers, attempted to develop and express their culture. In the late 1970’s they performed such plays as Ngaahika Ndeenda (I Will Marry When I Want) and went on to form the Kamiriithu Educatio and Cultural Center. The Kenyan government responded brutally to these developments of cultural assertion, and by March 1982 the Center was razed to the ground, and all drama and theatre activities in the area of Kamiriithu were banned. Ngugi reflects on the experience of Kamiriithu, but broadens its lessons to the overall experience of the present situation in Kenya. These essays speaks to the issues of cultural domination and resistance as well as focusing on the political currents impacting on the overall social and political condition in Africa and the world. Ngugi here challenges African intellectuals and Kenyans in particular to rise and speak out against oppression and domination so that the "iron hand of the oppressors may not be strengthened by the silence of those who have refused to speak out."

Barrel of A Pen is very much in the tradition of Ngugi’s earlier collection of essays: Homecoming and Writers in Politics.


Click for more detail about The Goddess Blackwoman: Mother of Civilization by Akil The Goddess Blackwoman: Mother of Civilization

by Akil
Nia Communications (Oct 01, 1996)
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Click for more detail about Flight from the Devil: Six Slave Narratives by William L. Katz Flight from the Devil: Six Slave Narratives

by William L. Katz
Africa World Press (Jan 01, 1996)
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During the early 19th century some African American men and women who broke their chains also gave the abolitionist movement its strongest verbal weapons in the form of detailed autobiographies that exposed the slave system. Perceptive, dramatic, and often starkly horrifying, these narratives dared to challenge their author’s former owners who sang the praises of human bondage. Having examined the slave narratives, recent scholars have judged them historically accurate and reliable, and the most significant form of early African American literature.

The six narratives in this volume are: Linda Brent, who was held in sexual bondage until she fled to freedom and wrote her story; William Wells Brown, a runaway who became the first African American novelist and playwright; James Pennington who escaped to become a minister and civil rights activist in Brooklyn; Lunsford Lane, an inventor/entrepreneur who purchased his family’s freedom; Jacob Stroyer, who was liberated during the war and became a minister in Salem, Massachusetts; and Moses Grandy, who escaped to England and wrote his book.


Click for more detail about Osun Seegesi: The Elegant Deity of Wealth, Power, and Femininity by Diedre Badejo Osun Seegesi: The Elegant Deity of Wealth, Power, and Femininity

by Diedre Badejo
Africa World Press (Nov 01, 1995)
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What does our sophisticated, technically advanced society have to learn from a venerable African goddess? That is the question Dr. Diedre Badejo set out to answer a decade ago, armed only with a tape recorder, a working knowledge of Yoruba language, literature, and culture, and a mental "image" of the African Motherland molded as much by her great grandmother’s character as by her own experience of the Black Power and Black Studies movements of the ’60s and ’70s. The answers Dr. Badejo found as she immersed herself in the ritual orature, sacred songs, and festival drama of the Yoruba goddess Osun Seegesi at the deity’s principal shrine in the city of Osogbo, Nigeria, are shared with the world in this detailed documentary/analysis that presents a startling view of human relations and relationships that is powerful in its practicality and revolutionary in its civility. What Osun (pronounced "Oh-Shoon") offers to a civilization standing "at the crossroads" and poised on the "abyss of transition", says the author, is nothing less than "an African feminist theory that challenges the hegemony of the Western social order" with a holistic sociocultural vision that recognizes and affirms the reciprocal role of women and men in building and sustaining a truly civil society.


Click for more detail about The Life and Times of Menelik II: Ethiopia 1844-1913 by Harold G. Marcus The Life and Times of Menelik II: Ethiopia 1844-1913

by Harold G. Marcus
The Red Sea Press (Mar 01, 1995)
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Of all the major African countries only Ethiopia successfully defeated late nineteenth-century European imperialism. To a considerable extent this was due to the political and military genius of Menelik II. This study of the Emperor’s long reign helps to explain Ethiopia’s survival; it also reveals Menelik as the man who earned through programs of expansion and modernization which led tot his creation of the Ethiopia of today. This is the most substantial contribution so far in an inexplicably neglected aspect of African history.


Click for more detail about Garvey: Africa, Europe, the Americas by Rupert Lewis and and Maureen Warner-Lewis Garvey: Africa, Europe, the Americas

by Rupert Lewis and and Maureen Warner-Lewis
Africa World Press (Sep 01, 1994)
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This selection of essays marked a breakthrough in studies of the Garvey movement and helped shape subsequent scholarly work. The essays were originally presented to the first international seminar of Garvey scholars held in 1973 at the University of the West Indies. The seminar surveyed both the international scope and local activities of the Garvey movement in the United States, Africa, the Caribbean and Europe. It examined the relationship with other political organizations and documented the repressive actions of contemporary governments against Marcus Garvey and the Universal Negro Improvement Association and African Communities League. The essays also assess the UNIA’s impact on modern decolonization and civil rights movements. The collection was first published in 1986 to mark the centenary of Garvey’s birth in 1987.


Click for more detail about Too Much Schooling, Too Little Education: A Paradox of Black Life in White Societies by Mwalimu J. Shujaa Too Much Schooling, Too Little Education: A Paradox of Black Life in White Societies

by Mwalimu J. Shujaa
Africa World Press (Jun 01, 1994)
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A classic contribution to developing educational settings, with cultural understanding for African children


Click for more detail about The Time: Portrait of a Journey Home : Poems and Photographs by Esther Iverem The Time: Portrait of a Journey Home : Poems and Photographs

by Esther Iverem
Africa World Press (Mar 01, 1994)
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Book by Iverem, Esther


Click for more detail about Voices from the Battlefront: Achieving Cultural Equity by Marta Moreno-Vega Voices from the Battlefront: Achieving Cultural Equity

by Marta Moreno-Vega
Africa World Press (Sep 01, 1993)
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The essays in this book represent the ideas of those in the frontline of the struggle for racial and cultural equity


Click for more detail about The Days When the Animals Talked: Black American Folktales and How They Came to Be (Young Readers) by William J. Faulkner The Days When the Animals Talked: Black American Folktales and How They Came to Be (Young Readers)

by William J. Faulkner
Africa World Press (Jan 01, 1993)
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Presents more than 20 Afro-American folktales featuring the escapades of Brer Rabbit and more than 10 tales describing the lives of Afro-American slaves.


Click for more detail about Kemet, Afrocentricity, and Knowledge by Molefi Kete Asante Kemet, Afrocentricity, and Knowledge

by Molefi Kete Asante
Africa World Press (Dec 01, 1992)
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"Asante’s book, Kemet,Afrocentricity,and Knowledge, continues his project of forging a new discipline out of the many strands of Black Studies. Like his previous works, this is a profound statement of the Afrocentric perspective."…C. Tsehloane Keto, Ph.D., Director of Graduate Studies, Dept of African American Studies, Temple University.
"This volume is a joy to read. It is accessible to anyone because of its richly textured images, ideas, and concepts. It is filled with intellectual allusions and rate isight into african culture. If ind this book truly refreshing."…Milgun Anadolu Okur, Ph.d.,american Studies, Izmir University, Turkey.
"This book addresses the most important theoretical and methodological questions facing the discipline of African American Studies. Asante’s point is that Africology is a discipline, not a group of courses related only in their subject matter. He makes a phenomenal advance in our conceptualization."…Patrick D. Bellegarde-smith, Ph.D., Chair, Dept of Afro-American Studies, university of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.
Molefi Kete Asante is chairperson of the Temple University Dept of African American Studies and a leading figure in the Afrocentrism School. He is the author or twenty-five books, including Afrocentricity.


Click for more detail about Missing in Action and Presumed Dead: Poems by Rashidah Ismaili Missing in Action and Presumed Dead: Poems

by Rashidah Ismaili
Africa World Press (Sep 01, 1992)
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"In these brilliant poems, human life intersects with the human heart, the inner and outer cities, the bushes and the backwaters of our days and nights collide with fate and hope in rivers of song, in crystal diction, that will send goose pimples up and down your spine." -Calvin Herton

"Rashidah Ismailli’s poetry sings beautifully of the whole African diaspora, from Harlem to Brazil, from an urban woman who lacks the money to pay her AT&T bill, to an African village woman who has no words for death by bombing. It is poetry of witness, preserving in its verses the slaves, the activists, the lovers and the political prisoners that the history tries to obliterate." -Charles Sugnet

"There is such beauty in Rashidah Ismailli’s poetry, such honesty, such integrity… there is truth too deep down and pain as well— the pain of being enslaved, of being possessed by one’s humanity, and of being displaced!

One is bound to be impressed; and I was." -Nuruddin Farah


Click for more detail about Stolen Legacy: Greek Philosophy Is Stolen Egyptian Philosophy by George G. M. James Stolen Legacy: Greek Philosophy Is Stolen Egyptian Philosophy

by George G. M. James
Africa World Press (Jul 01, 1992)
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The book is an attempt to show that the true authors of Greek philosophy were not the Greeks, but the people of North Africa, commonly called the Egyptians; and the praise and honor falsely given to the Greeks for centuries belong to the people of North Africa, and therefore to the African Continent. Consequently, this theft of the African legacy by the Greeks led to the erroneous world opinion that the African Continent has made no contribution to civilization, and that its people are naturally backward. This is the misrepresentation that has become the basis of race prejudice, which has affected all people of color.

The term Greek philosophy, to begin with a misnomer, for there is no such philosophy in existence. The ancient Egyptians had developed a very complex religious system, called the Mysteries, which was also the first system of salvation. As such, it regarded the human body as a prison house of the soul, which could be liberated from its bodily impediments, through the disciples of the Arts and Sciences, and advanced form the level of a mortal to that of a God. This was the notion of the summon bonum or greatest good, to which all men must aspire, and it also became the basis of all ethical concepts. The Egyptian Mystery was also a Secret Order, and membership was gained by initiation and a pledge to secrecy. The teaching was graded and delivered orally to the neophyte: and under these circumstances of secrecy, the Egyptians developed secret systems of writing and teaching, and forbade their Initiates from writing what they had learned. After nearly five thousand years of prohibition against the Greeks, they were permitted to enter Egypt for the purpose of their education. First through the Persian invasion and secondly through the invasion of Alexander the Great. From the sixth century B.C. therefore to the death of Aristotle (322 B.C.) the Greeks made the best of their chance to learn all they could about Egyptian culture; most students received instructions directly from the Egyptian Priests, but after the invasion by Alexander the Great, the Royal temples and libraries were plundered and pillaged, and Aristotle’s school converted the library at Alexandria into a research center. There is no wonder then, that the production of the unusually large number of books ascribed to Aristotle has proved a physical impossibility, for any single man within a lifetime.


Click for more detail about Africans at the Crossroads: Notes for an African World Revolution by John Henrik Clarke Africans at the Crossroads: Notes for an African World Revolution

by John Henrik Clarke
Africa World Press (Jan 01, 1992)
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Africans at the Crossroads essays, have been broadly organized in five thematic sections, and focus on the African and African American freedom struggle in the African world, as well as detailed discussion of the uncompleted revolutions of five monumental African leaders.


Click for more detail about The Black Man in the Old Testament and Its World by Alfred G. Dunston Jr The Black Man in the Old Testament and Its World

by Alfred G. Dunston Jr
Africa World Press (Jan 01, 1992)
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An attempt to portray the Black man as he was viewed during the Old Testament times.


Click for more detail about Africans at the Crossroads: African World Revolution by John Henrik Clarke Africans at the Crossroads: African World Revolution

by John Henrik Clarke
Africa World Press (Dec 01, 1991)
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Dr. John Henrik Clarke, the late outstanding African-American historian, has brought the range of his years of scholarly work together in this single and comprehensive volume. The topics he covers are as varied and interesting as his experience in the Pan-Africanist struggle.

Notes for an African World Revolution: Africans at the Crossroads is a collection of essays that have been broadly amassed in five thematic sections. Clarke begins with the roots of the African and African-American freedom struggle in the African World. A major section is devoted to a detailed discussion of the “uncompleted revolution” of five monumental African leaders: Kwame Nkrumah, Patrice Lumumba, Marcus Gravey, Malcom X, and Tom Mboya.

The rest of the essays focus on topics ranging from the conquest of African to the struggles for freedom in South Africa and the Pan-Africanist movement. Clarke ends his collection with his important and timely essay “Can African People Save Themselves?”


Click for more detail about Garvey, His Work and Impact by Rupert Lewis Garvey, His Work and Impact

by Rupert Lewis
Africa World Press (Aug 01, 1991)
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Twenty-one articles deal with the historical background to Garvey and Garveyism, women in the movement and the importance of gender, the influence of Garvey on Jamaican culture and the peoples of the Caribbean.

No facet of Jamaican life escaped the imprint of Garvey’s powerful message with its unique Afrocentric perspective which spread into the religious realm where Black Jamaicans created God in their own image. An international panel assesses Pan-African and other issues in Garveyism, including race and economic progress int his collection of essays.

Contributors to this volume:
Norman P. Girvan, Don Robotham, Swithin Wilmot, Patrick Bryan, Tony Martin, Honor Ford-Smith, Beverly Hamilton, Carolyn Cooper, Barry Chevannes, Rev. Ernie P. Gordon, Philip Potter, Carl Stone, Horace Campbell, Adebowale Adefuye, Juditih Stein, Rupert Lewis, William A. Edwards, Derek Gordon, Trevor Munroe, Rex Nettle ford, Bernardo Garcia Dominguez


Click for more detail about James Van Derzee: The Picture Takin’ Man by James Haskins James Van Derzee: The Picture Takin’ Man

by James Haskins
Africa World Press (Jun 01, 1991)
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A biography of the black photographer who has received acclaim for his prints of Harlem.


Click for more detail about New Dimensions in African History by John Henrik Clarke New Dimensions in African History

by John Henrik Clarke
Africa World Press (Apr 01, 1991)
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From the Nile valley to the new world, science invention and technology. The London lectures of Dr. John henrik Clarke and Dr Yosef ben-Jochannan were delivered for the minority Ethnic Unit of the Greater London Council in 1986. Since then there had been a great demend for these lectures, which were recorded along with an extensive question and answer period. Dr clarke has edited these lectures and has expanded the collection to include important biographical notes on both Dr ben-Jochannan and himself as well an invaluable reading guide on African history.


Click for more detail about Walter Rodney Speaks: The Making Of An African Intellectual by Walter Rodney Walter Rodney Speaks: The Making Of An African Intellectual

by Walter Rodney
Africa World Press (Feb 01, 1990)
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The following is excepted from a Review by Rupert Lewis

This is not a collection of speeches. It is a narrative based on interviews with Rodney done on April 30 and May 1, 1975 at a round-table discussion held at the University of Massachusetts with African-American scholars Vincent Harding, William Strickland, Howard Dodson and the Jamaican scholar Robert Hill who were active in the Atlanta-based Institute of the Black World.

It is a sustained piece of reflection by Rodney about his early life in Guyana, his University education in Jamaica and at the School for Oriental and African Studies in London where he gained his Ph.d. at 24, his important years in Tanzania, his assessment of the situation in Africa, the Caribbean and the United States, his dissecting of the dynamic interaction of race and class, his incisive and clear exposition of the role of the black intellectual and academic and his exploration of his formation as a Marxist.

When Rodney did these interviews he had just turned thirty-three and had five more years to live. So this text is of necessity five important years short. However his reflections on this latter period are scattered in a number of archives on cassettes, videotapes and in published speeches but it is unlikely that the quality of enquiry into Rodney’s intellectual life which marks this book exists in any of these sources.


Click for more detail about Black Awakening in Capitalist America: An Analytical History by Robert H. Allen Black Awakening in Capitalist America: An Analytical History

by Robert H. Allen
Africa World Press (Feb 01, 1990)
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Black Awakening in Capitalist America is a classic study of the Black liberation movement of the 1960s. Examining Black Power and black capitalism, the student and radical movements, nationalists and integrationists, Allen argues that Black America, hemmed in by racism, constitutes an underdeveloped, domestic colony within the United States.

Black Power was an expression of black nationalism and the thrust toward black self-determination. Allen suggests that corporate America responded with neo-colonial tactics of cooptation and repression that seriously undermined the movement.

Black Awakening in Capitalist America is essential reading to underst the origins and development of the contemporary black struggle for freedom.

"A definitive work. This book must be read and reread." -The Black Scholar

"Virtually indispensable for an understanding of what is going on today in black communities across the nation." -The Guardian

"Provocative… Allen supports his thesis persuasively." -Publishers Weekly


Click for more detail about From the Pyramids to the Projects: Poems of Genocide and Resistance! by Askia M. Toure From the Pyramids to the Projects: Poems of Genocide and Resistance!

by Askia M. Toure
Africa World Press (Dec 01, 1989)
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The author calls attention to the struggle of and for existence of black culture; he brings the situation forward in such an intelligent way that it is more relevant now - in this day and time.


Click for more detail about Out of the Kumbla: Caribbean Women and Literature by Carole Boyce-Davies Out of the Kumbla: Caribbean Women and Literature

by Carole Boyce-Davies
Africa Research and Publications (Dec 01, 1989)
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A volume of essays that seeks to give voice to Caribbean women’s concerns


Click for more detail about The Rasta Cookbook: Vegetarian Cuisine by Laura Osborne The Rasta Cookbook: Vegetarian Cuisine

by Laura Osborne
Africa World Press (Sep 01, 1989)
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"You are what you eat" this is the core of the philosophy on which the Rastafari base their eating habits and cuisine. This book presents for the first time in print, a mouthwatering collection of recipes, the best of Rasta cooking. The cultural and religious basis of the cuisine are explained in full. A review of tropical fruits and vegetables is given and along with this, vital information on where, how to get and how to prepare the ingredients for this exotic cuisine.


Click for more detail about The Black Messiah by Albert B. Cleage, Jr. The Black Messiah

by Albert B. Cleage, Jr.
Africa World Press (Jan 01, 1989)
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For nearly 500 years the illusion that Jesus was white dominated the world only because white Europeans dominated the world. Now, with the emergence of the nationalist movements of the world’s colored majority, the historic truth is finally beginning to emerge—that Jesus was the non-white leader of a non-white people struggling for national liberation against the rule of a white nation, Rome. The intermingling of the races in Africa and the Mediterranean area is an established fact. The Nation Israel was a mixture of Chaldeans, Egyptians, Midianites, Ethiopians, Kushites, Babylonians and other dark peoples, all of whom were already mixed with the black people of Central Africa.

That white Americans continue to insist upon a white Christ in the face of all historical evidence to the contrary and despite the hundreds of shrines to Black Madonnas all over the world, is the crowning demonstration of their white supremacist conviction that all things good and valuable must be white. On the other hand, until black Christians are ready to challenge this lie, they have not freed themselves from their spiritual bondage to the white man nor established in their own minds their right to first-class citizenship in Christ’s kingdom on earth. Black people cannot build dignity on their knees worshipping a white Christ. We must put down this white Jesus which the white man gave us in slavery and which has been tearing us to pieces.


Click for more detail about Rasta and Resistance: From Marcus Garvey to Walter Rodney by Horace G. Campbell Rasta and Resistance: From Marcus Garvey to Walter Rodney

by Horace G. Campbell
Africa World Press (Feb 01, 1987)
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Rasta and Resistance is a study of the Rastafarian Movement in all its manifestations, from its evolution in the hills of Jamaica to its present manifestations in the streets of Birmingham and the Shashamane Settlement in Ethiopia. It traces the cultural, political and spiritual sources of this movement of resistance, highlighting the quest for change among an oppressed people. This book serves to break the intellectual traditions which placed the stamp of millenarianism on Rasta.

"Absence of a political enquiry into the Rastafari of the Caribbean has always been an uncomfortable gap in the record of the Caribbean revolution. Now Horace Campbell has bade a big step towards the filling of that gap. This is not to suggest that Caribbean writers and thinkers (we should not confuse the two groups) have not done much investigation of the Rastafari way of life with all the clarity and depth which their areas of investigation permitted them; some have also ventured into the political dominion. Campbell has many of the qualifications for the task he has undertaken. He has been struggling for some years to apply the scientific theory of society to the reality of African and Caribbean politics, and in the process has avoided the creation of false gods."