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Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/31/2019 in Posts

  1. 4 points
    We are all aware of the mainstream media's negative narrative about black men. We are constantly bombarded with stories of high incarceration rates, black on black violence, deadbeat dads and of course police brutality. From the outside looking in it appears that black men are destined for failure and there is nothing that can be done to change the implied negative trajectory that black men are on. But is the media's narrative true? Are black men really an endangered species? I believe the answer is an emphatic no and I have made it my life's to work to support and empower black men to overcome the negative stereotypes and to create extraordinary lives. In order for black men to succeed the first thing they must do is understand how societal conditioning contributes to creating a negative mindset and attitude about what it means to be a black man. Too many black men feel hopeless and powerless as a result of the constant barrage of negative images and stories coming not only from the white biased media but also from the black media that definitely contributes to the negative narratives about what it means to be black. So what can be done to support black men in overcoming the multiplicity of challenges they face on a daily basis? How can we help change the mindset of black men and empower them to know they have unlimited potential and the future is extremely bright for those who are willing to put forth the effort? I believe the key to resolving a large percentage of challenges facing black them is to support them in changing their own inner narrative about themselves. The good book says; "be ye not conformed to this world, but be ye transformed by the renewing of your mind." Herein lies the key to transforming black men's lives. We must be willing to encourage black men to examine the internal negative beliefs and perceptions they have about themselves. We must engage them in a dialog about what they believe, how they feel and what they think about being black. Too many times their inner dialog about themselves is so negative they have no choice other than to act out that negative internal dialog. Therefore it is incumbent upon us to change their inner dialog by providing resources that support them in changing their negative mindset and attitude. This can be accomplished through things like workshops and seminars, reading books, listening to audio programs and creating support groups that provide safe spaces for them to speak openly about the highs and lows, joys and pain of being a black man. When we help them change their inner dialog about themselves it will give them a sense of optimism and hope for the future which will then encourage them to develop a positive mindset and attitude that will keep them from falling victim to negative media generated narratives about who they are. It is definitely possible for any black man to live an extraordinary life. We are all capable of creating inner peace, dynamic health, great relationships and financial abundance. To do so, a black man must be willing to take 100% responsibility for his life turning out the way he wants it to. The only way to do this is through changing his inner narrative about himself and recognizing that he has the capacity to do anything he sets his mind to.
  2. 4 points
    The first 24 hour Black News Channel is expected to launch November 15, 2019 @6:00 AM. The cable network is the brainchild of J.C. Watts, Jr., former U.S Representative (R-Oklahoma) now BNC chairman and Veteran Journalist Bob Brilliante who will serve as the cable network's CEO. BNC Newsroom management made their rounds at the National Association Black Journalists Job fair in Miami, FL earlier this month. The news channel, headquartered in Tallahassee, Fl, will broadcast to 33 million households nationwide with a major presence in Los Angeles, Atlanta and New York. ~MH You can read the release here: https://blacknewschannel.com/wp-content/uploads/BNC_NABJ-Press-Release_2019.pdf
  3. 3 points
  4. 3 points
  5. 3 points
    It is not the biggest home office I ever had, but it is the most comfortable. While I miss socializing, I also appreciate how truly lucky I am. I'm not saying I don't have challenges, but relatively speaking... I called a longtime buddy of mine yesterday, a physician, he is in the hospital, on oxygen, as a result of Covid19. He told me he had gotten so sick that he wished he had died. Fortunately, he will recover. My friend is wealthy. I think about all the poor people, in his situation, that have died painful deaths, alone, and scared. Will this prompt Americans to fight stop a system that increase wealthy inequality and has millions without health insurance? ----- This is the kind of thing would have shared on social media were I still using it for personal reasons. I never really considered it, but these forums is my "social media." I haven't written a Blog post since August of 2019. Pretty much anything I have to say, I say it here. Stay healthy fam.
  6. 3 points
    Cynique writes, "Tell all of my AALBC 'frienenemies' I said, "stay well." I know we all (at least I have) have been jonesing to read something from Cynique about the passing scene: “Welcome to 2020! I always knew things would catch up with this country, but I never imagined that I would be around to see it. Unlike some, however, i don't believe a conspiracy theory is at work via the new world order; the inevitable has just come to pass. I don't think the USA will ever be the same after this pandemic, and the shit is really gonna hit the fan come election time. But, whatever. I'll be doing good to even be around in November. So far, i haven't exhibited any corona symptoms and like everybody else, I'm social distancing myself on voluntary quarantine. If the virus doesn't get me, my intense loathing for Trump might bring me down. I.DESPISE.HIM. I can't believe how the Universe has put him in place as a leader during this time of crises. But with his luck, he might just emerge smelling like a rose when this new flu proves to be much ado about nothing and that the real disaster was our overreaction to it. Me and my cynicism do find the way the media is handling it to be a bit much. Yet, I have mixed emotions. In addition to the radiation being emitted by cell phone towers being the origin of the virus, another one of the theories out there on FaceBook is that if your ears are ringing, you are getting signals from unseen forces about to take over Earth, and my ears are really picking up a lot of static! Oh, well, i always did think I was an alien. And the bizarre supernatural activity that continues to occur within the walls of my bedroom in the middle of the night are very unnerving... “
  7. 3 points
    I appreciate you guys allowing me to become a part of this endeavor. I love my people and remain seriously concerned for our future. Here and in Africa.
  8. 3 points
    AAAAHHHHH! I LOVE CHERYL CROW! No you didn't!!! LOL. Man! That was so good! Such a release! Man! Thank you @Kareem @Maurice Thank you for posting. WHEW! WHEW! I LOVE THE BEATLES. Man! I could listend to 'Hey Jude' over and over and over... This has made my day!!! Lol! I ain't listening to no mo!--for now because I won't stop. I love CHIC and KC & the Sunshine Band. Man!
  9. 3 points
    This song and Baez's sound reminds me of Sheryl Crow, who I really like. I'll listen to more of Joan Baez based on your recommendation. There were a lot of folksy ladies like this in the early 1990s along with Sheryl Crow. The 10,000 Maniacs (Natalie Merchant) are also high on my early 90s favorites. Truth be told, one of my first girlfriends when I was very young was a white chick who played the violin. So 10,000 Maniacs kind of reminds me of that! But I've always loved the sound of violins and other string instruments (cello, viola, etc.). Nile Rodgers in the late 1970s used them all to perfection in his music, and it's always cute white chicks playing those violins and violas! Again there will never be another 70s or 80s. The talent to compose and perform the music, the love, the respect between black and white...all that cannot exist today...sadly. We tried so hard in the USA to fix racism in the 70s and 80s. The powers-that-be just didn't want that to happen. In sum...
  10. 3 points
    At the risk of 'jumping in', I'd like to welcome you back even though Ive only been a member for six months now. Greetings from South East England.
  11. 3 points
    I'm reading a few books but am primarily focused on Evil Never Sleeps: Tales of Light and Darkness, by Robert Fleming. Robert is one of America’s most accomplished writers. He has written poetry, novels, nonfiction articles, and has reviewed over 60 books for AALBC. His work spans over 40 years. It seems to me that writers like Robert should be better known, but he is just your run of the mill late-middle-aged Black man {yawn}. He’s not Caribbean or African, he’s not LGBT, he does not have a white parent, he can’t rap or dunk a basketball, he wasn’t gang banger or previously incarcerated. He is the kind of writer that I always complain about being ignored by the mainstream media. Robert's accomplishments will never go viral on twitter despite his significant contributions to our literature.
  12. 3 points
    @Pioneer1 You may be right. Black discussion forums are rapidly becoming a thing of the past. I revisited a post, not even two years old, where someone who ran a discussion forum ranked a few others. Half the forums have shut down -- including the one run by the person who made the post. Connie summed it up best she has more fun on Facebook. The part about typos on posts here, while true, is also true on facebook. That really is the bottom line. For the vast majority of social media users I observe in real life - who pass me their phone to share something funny they saw on some social site. Of course these sites are designed to highly engage folks and they work very well. Fast growing platforms like TikTok are completely driven by entertaining videos. Facebook's mobile feed attempts to mimic this but they can't... ultimately people will leave Facebook too. During the peak of this forum, I would regularly laugh out loud by something I read here, but I could also learn something. There was humourous posts, serious ones, and everything in between. Most importantly, at least to me, is that this platform is Black-owned and independent. I'm a child of the 60s, who grew up in the segregated northern ghetto of Harlem. So Black independence is a thing I find to be important. This is a sentiment that is dying along with indie Black focused and owned websites. One reason independence is important is that businesses like AALBC provides opportunities for people. The writers, editors, and others I pay are not being paid by the likes of a Mark Zuckerberg. Of course AALBC's ability to do this is adversely impacted the dominace of Google, Amazon, and social. Fortunately, individuals whether they are sponsors, site vistors, or contributors to this forum are the people who keep this site alive. If you are reading this thank YOU for helping to keep this site alive! Also, thank you on behalf of the writers whose work you support, but who will probably never fully appreciate your impact.
  13. 2 points
    Well, no more 'white'-washing the truth of the United States of America - coming to a bookstore in the UK and US, a book about the wrongfully imprisoned. HarperCollins Children's Books will publish Punching the Air, a YA novel about a black Muslim teen who is wrongfully sentenced to prison. (see link at the bottom) If this scenario seems familiar the book is co-authored by one of Exonerated Five, Dr Yusef Salaam, fomerly the Central Park five. The Young Adult book arrives on the shelves in September 2020 https://www.thebookseller.com/news/harpercollins-childrens-books-publish-ya-book-one-exonerated-five-1203387#
  14. 2 points
    You and your friends are cordially invited to the Independent Book Publishers Benjamin Franklin Award Ceremony. Watch writers receive awards in more than 50 categories. The ceremony takes place from Tuesday, May 4 to Friday, May 8, from 4PM- 6PM Pacific Time. You don't have to dress up or catch a plane to California (not that you could). It is free. All you have to do is register. And you don't have to attend all four days. May 8 is the last day you can register. Click on the link below to watch the 1minute 35 second video. Scroll down below the video to click on the link to register. I was told I could invite the world. I am trying my best to do so. Hope to see you there. Here's the link
  15. 2 points
    Here is a quote from a comment on one of the authors pages. I deleted a few moments ago. "I abominate this black jigaboo who wouldn't even make a good field hand. Pretending to be an intellectual? With a 400,000-year evolutionary shortfall, she needs another two centuries to learn how properly to wipe herself." I delete comments like this all the time. For some reason this one struck me as particularly unnecessary -- gratuitous even -- because the subject of this attack is a very nice women. Perhaps the only "controversial" thing about her is that she is lesbian, something the "commenter" did not bring up. Why do people invest so much time spreading hate?
  16. 2 points
  17. 2 points
    I know I'm late to the party and y'all done ate up all the chips and dip and drank all the punch, too!! But, I thought I'd add a little something - and something quite different than most of what's been shared. I'm an older Brother, who digs a lot of what has been posted already, but a couple of friends (who don't know each other and have different tastes) have recently turned me on to some music that some here at AALBC might dig. First up, the 'British' (really Afro-Caribbean) saxophone player Shabaka and the Ancestors. Most of the band members are from South Africa and they are jamming. A brief introduction: This is one tune: https://youtu.be/TnkjcS_yTfA For a more extensive experience, here's their live performance from a couple years ago, which I really enjoyed. https://youtu.be/IU4vpE2eGho Damani
  18. 2 points
    Legendary pianist died.
  19. 2 points
    @Chevdove you were probably to young to remember tbe concert Wattstax. They made a documentary film in the 70s with same name. I saw the film in the theater and I recall wnjoying it a great deal. I own the DVD -- check it out
  20. 2 points
    Right. All those 1s and 2s. Four, of course, is divisible by both. Spirituality is apparently quite numeric. Didn't think this thread would actually become this interesting.
  21. 2 points
    Azacotogan What you don't seem to see is that if I have to "provide evidence" of African concepts to an "African" then it is already a lost proposition. ....and most of our people are lost. The fact that most Africans in the West are "lost" to the knowledge of not only their own culture and spirituality but indeed THEMSELVES should be enough reason to readily provide valuable knowledge to any African who sincerely enquires. I am an African, not black, as you called yourself. There's HUGE difference from a psychological perspective. You're new to this site. If you stick around a while you'll realize that I actually DO call myself an African. I just use the term "Black" in conversation with many people to avoid confusion because despite it being an innaccurate term, it is the most commonly understood term for our people in English speaking society. But it's clear now you're not going to get it. Maybe not now....... I used karma as a reference because most have a general idea of it but not because the two are parallel Kind of like how I use the terms "African" and "Black". Where are you getting information from? There is no African culture that I know of that has this stance on these things. It certainly isn't like that in Vodun. You are just speculating. There is so much more to these things in Vodun but you write as though you have it all figured out. Smh. But you are focusing on karma. The article is about salawa Exactly what part of my statement that you are commenting on is false or inaccurate? You think that I have to share certain experiences I've had with you as strong evidence that what I'm saying is correct? No, you don't "have" to. But it would be nice. You come on here and promote your spiritual concepts yet refuse to share key aspects of the spiritual abilities you should be receiving from it. Anybody who is able bodied can just "go through the motions" but how do we KNOW that what we practice is truly spiritually transforming if it doesn't bring you face to face with THE spiritual kingdom? Are you serious? Yes, show me the money. That's your criteria? Part of it. That could easily be made up. I could tell you anything and you would have no way of truly knowing if what I'm telling you is the truth. However I've dealt with spirituality and spiritual people enough to recognize whether or not your experiences share the same patterns with those who ARE legitimate.....which would lend more credibility to your claims.   Not clear what you're referring to but in general if an African refers to themselves as any kind of american then caucasians have succeeded in conquering their Ori African is a race, American is a nationality....the two can easily be reconciled.
  22. 2 points
    Two years ago I was working with a law firm that took the case of a black woman imprisoned in Texas for debt (credit cards). The Eighth Amendment clearly states that cruel and unusual punishment includes "excessive bail" and "excessive fines." It essentially means you cannot go to jail over debt. I pulled some old state-level precedent in Texas affirming this position while writing her habeas corpus brief. She was released from jail after three months. We then sued the debt collector and the Harris County Sheriff's Office. The case settled out of court. Granted we strategically got the cases in front of sympathetic judges. So this won't work everywhere despite the law being pretty clear about debt and prison.
  23. 2 points
    Lol! Absolutely! Pittsburgh has made fine contributions to our literature. August Wilson's Century cycle and John Edgar Wideman. @Maurice with more regular contributors the forum will pick up. Sometimes I get a bit discouraged as maintenance is a chore and there of course is the expense, but i think the benefits still out weigh the downsides.
  24. 2 points
    I'm not knocking the musician. This particular song just doesn't move me. The 70s were the first full decade black people experienced in this country without slavery or Jim Crow. Disco and funk reflected that. We had fun, relaxed and displayed our musical prowess. It takes talent to play instruments, read and write music. So I'd disagree that funk is simple. But it reflects a relatively simple time when black people finally felt a little relief from the boots on our necks. The only music that is unique to Europeans is opera. And nobody likes that crap except Europeans. Everything else they stole from cultured people. Michael Bolton's entire career is plagiarism. The Isley Brothers won a $5.2 million lawsuit against Bolton in 2001 for the latter plagiarizing their song "Love is a Wonderful Thing." That Katy Perry chick plagiarized a Christian rap group for one of her biggest hits. If litigation wasn't so expensive and time-consuming, I'd bet 90% of white "artists" would be exposed for who and what they are. That's why white supremacist society ushered in rap in the late 80s. They wanted black people to be talentless copycats too, like them. And man, that Billy Ocean tape with Caribbean Queen, Suddenly, and Mystery Lady might be one of the best albums of all time. The 1980s was the closest the United States will ever get to being a racial melting pot of peace and understanding. And it was the music and television shows that did it. I believe white supremacist society recognized that they were humanizing black people too much in the 80s and they quickly propped up gangsta rap and all those hood movies in the 1990s to destroy what the 80s had done for our overall image. I wasn't alive in the 1960s at all. But must say I am a big fan of all the original Motown sounds and classic rock. Many of the 80s biggest hits that you wouldn't know were remakes came from the 1960s. Joan Jett's "I Love Rock 'N Roll" is a one of the biggest hits of the 1980s. It's a remake by a 70s group called the Arrows. Bananarama's "Venus" was a #1 hit for several weeks in the mid-1980s. It's a remake from the 1960s-70s band Shocking Blue. Tiffany hit #1 with "I Think We're Alone Now." All the kids my age back then had no idea it was a song by Tommy James and the Shondells. There hasn't been much originality since the 1970s. It's funny how the US and UK were very petty in the 1970s and 1980s as far as what bands they allowed from the other country to rank on their respective charts. I was introduced to T Rex and Sweet only because they were played at my local skating rink in the 1980s. My local public library had a HUGE catalog of albums and 8-track tapes, along with a great librarian who knew his stuff about music (a former DJ who influenced my career). The first paper I ever wrote in school was in 3rd or 4th grade and it was about glam rock. It definitely influenced all the 80s hairbands and some of the others wearing outrageous outfits on stage. I don't know why I could never get into the Beatles. Maybe because I always wanted to be different and everyone liked them. Don't get me wrong. There are several Beatles songs I like. I was a black kid who grew up in a white town so basically whatever my friends' parents listened to, that was my experience since my parents were all about soul, funk and R&B. My town was more about Led Zeppelin, The Doors, Janice Joplin and Canadian rockers like Bachman-Turner Overdrive from the 1970s. You and I could probably sit around, smoke weed and listen to music for hours though! :)
  25. 2 points
    This is the first time I've ever heard this song. It's a combination of gospel and blues, if that's really a distinction. Can't say I like it. This strikes me as field slave coping music! Granted we needed this back in the day. But it ain't groovy or nothing! 😀 I think the 80s was the most perfect age of music. I wish time stood still in that decade. It was the first decade of the 20th century without war or recession; and the music reflected that. Lots of fun, heartwarming, unity music from the 80s. But the 70s was the last decade for true black creative music, meaning when black people wrote, produced and performed MUSIC. Janice–Marie Johnson and Perry Kibble (Taste of Honey) are so sexy playing the guitar and bass guitar in "Boogie Oogie Oogie." I love disco and funk so much because they were so US...so groovy and so soul-cleansing. Black people writing, producing and creating music was the norm in the 1970s. We played and perfected every instrument. Rap and vocals overall took over music in the 1980s. @Maurice if you've never seen it, you will appreciate this Jimmy Hendrix interview on the Dick Cavett Show in 1969. We'll never see another Hendrix. We'll never see another 70s or 80s either. Both decades are essentially considered politically incorrect these days. All those 80s odes to women by men, and women singing odes to men will never happen again. This society doesn't want men loving women and women loving men anymore. Whitney Houston's first great song, "All At Once," didn't even chart in the USA in 1985. But itt was top 5 in Belgium, Italy and the Netherlands. I think this is Whitney's greatest song of all time! Don't get me going on music though! LOL!
  26. 2 points
    2020: Everyone will have perfect vision. No glasses or contact lenses are needed. It’s 2020, a universal year for order: laying a solid foundation to build and grow. Collectivity and balance, oneness in thought and action. The heart should be balanced on the scales of justice to let go, grow and flow. Let go of those memories that attach to the past stagnation that prevents change for the better. Forgive and be forgiven. Love and be loved. Let the artist out. Get into your rhythm, your music. Harmonize, build, grow and unite. Love is in demand, Be complete. All the bestAubrey Doris 20 are even, and 19 is odd. Even numbers are considered feminine and receptive.
  27. 2 points
    The end of a decade or a century has a different vibration. Personally the 90's were very different than the 00's.
  28. 2 points
    Hey @Marion Hill here is a link to all the event on the "Circuit" that I'm aware of: https://aalbc.com/events/list.php/ The list also includes the festivals of many types around the world, but you have no problem identifying the event on the "Circuit." 😉 @Mel Hopkins I'm unsure too, but perhaps you are right.
  29. 2 points
    @Mel Hopkins Yeah Living Single was one of the last network sitcoms that I regularly watched. Kim was certainly Black Famous back when the show aired. Do you think she is Black famous amongst millennials and younger? Eric Jerome Dickey is probably Black Famous amongst readers. Do you think he is Black famous amongst the Black general public? Do you think AALBC is Black famous within the the group of avid readers who are also active online? Sometimes I'll run into a Black author who is promoting a book and says they are unfamiliar with my website and I'll joking say something like, "well you must not use the world wide web?" Sometimes that is actually the case, usually with an older person. Other times it is a combination of how the person used the web and how they web actually works. People tend to gravitate to the biggest websites and everything on the web serves to elevate the biggest sites. You need the white co-sign to become famous. Increasingly however -- especially on the web you need the white co-sign to become "Black famous." The celebs of "Black Twitter" would, of course, not be possible without Twitter. The same could reasonably be said for the start of Black Lives Matter. Black Chitlin' Circuit events for books makes it possible for writers to become Black Famous. Without these events it would be very difficult for a writer to have a career based solely upon writing. These events help raise the profile of AALBC -- which is why I do these events. That plus I love being around Black folk who have a passion for stories and knowledge.
  30. 2 points
    @B.D.C., that was a very thoughtful message and I appreciate you posting it. The vast majority of people coming do not share their ideas or opinion. Perhaps it is the fear of being ridiculed or appearing uninformed. I'm learning something new all the time here. The main reason for my message was to help authors understand that when you pitch your book to a bookseller to carry your book in their store, or website, you can not start the conversation with "Order Now on Amazon." This should be obvious, but it apparently is not, which I why I wrote the message. I wanted to help authors and publishers understand a bookseller's perspective. Amazon sells books indiscriminately, they could be bootlegged, retrieved from a dumpster, written by a terrible writer, or poorly produced. Amazon simply does not care; they are only concerned with revenue. All other booksellers curate they books they sell. We select books we think are worth reading and will benefit our customers. Marketing is a Beast -- definitely. If your goal is to make money with your book, marketing should begin before the book is written. The author should consider who the audience for the book is, how large the audience is, how will they reach the audience, and how much it will cost. Independently published authors rarely do this. After some analysis you may determine not to write the book. Indie authors produce the book then struggle with figuring out how to sell it. Don't discount the "views." People use the site to discover books. If you email me directly to pitch me a book to review -- only I see the book info. If you post it here others will see it -- perhaps someone interested in reviewing or reading it. We review very few books that are pitched to us. Part of the challenge is that having a book reviewed costs money, time, and energy. All the author invests is a book, but the entity doing the reviewing invests far more. We must be very selective in the books we choose to review -- otherwise we'd be out of business. This is one reason we offer a fee based book review service. Finally there are a lot of ways for authors to get their book on AALBC. In our FAQ, I mention 8 ways and most are free.
  31. 2 points
    The Kirkus Prize is one of the richest literary awards in the world, with a prize of $50,000 bestowed annually to authors of fiction, nonfiction, and young readers’ literature. There are 5 finalists in each category, 8 Black writers made up more than half of all the finalists and won every category! This is quite an accomplishment. When the award started in 2014 there was only one Black finalist and no winners.* *This is based upon recent research; if someone finds something that is factually inaccurate please let me know.
  32. 2 points
    News roundup for bloggers - Genius Media Group, Inc, the company behind the annotated lyrics website, is suing Google and Lyric Find for $50 million. The complaint mentions copying lyrics from the site and using it on the results page. Here's a link to the Brooklyn based media company's complaint filed December 03, 2019, in Brooklyn Supreme Court of New York State County of Kings https://iapps.courts.state.ny.us/nyscef/ViewDocument?docIndex=3E0o8kQz4X3cWcbbid67wQ== Several news sites report Internet Society (ISOC)'s Public Interest Registry, a nonprofit, sold the top-level domain dot-org registry. The winning bidder is a private equity firm Ethos Capital. Allegedly, the dot-org registry is Ethos Capital only asset, but their website ethoscapital.com indicates otherwise. In July this year, ICANN, the nonprofit responsible keeping all things equal and equitable in the domain registrar world, also voted to lift the cap on registration fees. According to news reports, there will be no registration fee hikes. Still, your dot-org registration fees could go up and become cost-prohibitive. Sadly, nonprofits mostly use the dot org extension for their organizations' websites. And other online nonprofit news media websites containing a treasure trove of information also use the dot-org extension. Should those websites not be able to pay the domain registration fee - that information might disappear. If you're a dot org registrant, you might want to secure registration for the ten years to keep your domain name. At least it will buy you some time while these things shake out.
  33. 2 points
    Troy Dude, what impact has BLM had on your life, or the life of anyone you know? BLM's pro-homophilia platform negatively impacts the social status of AfroAmericans in general and makes us look even more immoral and broken. You're looking at things from a typical U.S. INDIVIDUALISTIC mentality. You say what BLM does and what gays do have nothing to do with you and little impact on your life....which is the way it SHOULD be....but not the way it IS. When people from other nations and cultures (nations and cultures that are far more collectivist than ours) come to the United States or watch the politics of this nation from abroad and they see AfroAmericans engaged in or associated with crime, violence, mass incarceration, and now homophile and pedophile behavior....it justifies the mistreatment in their minds. If they see some acting that way...they assume ALL act that way.
  34. 2 points
    The World Is Rated X -Marvin Gaye After all these years of listening to Marvin, I discovered this shit a few months ago and can't get enough of that song. Been playing it over and over again. Maurice You mentioned Funkadelic....Cosmic Slop is the shit!
  35. 2 points
    Maurice I hear you...... I'm not sure about the laws in Romania but I'm a supporter of free speech. As long as you aren't calling for somone's harm or exposiong personal information about them like thier address or phone number.....I say you should speak your mind. Is it wrong? Ofcourse. But when you start punishing people for what they say it's becomes a slipperly slope. And ofcourse the station should have the right to fire that individual if they choose without the government forcing them to keep him or let him go. I say fight fire with fire. Serena should be allowed to go on a Romanian radio show and use some of the skills she learned growing up in "Da CPT" to roast his ass....lol.
  36. 2 points
    I actually attended Quincy Troupe's reading on Tuesday. It actually was an interesting event in park... Well it is not really a "park" in the sense anyone outside of NYC would think of one, but it is an oasis a break from the density popular concrete that surrounds. The park is near iconic FlatIron building (the former home of St. Martin's Press) and very close to where I teach Baruch College (which is why I went).
  37. 2 points
    I just don't see any difference at all between any of these people. The only President in history I have any respect for is JFK and I wasn't even alive back then. He's just the epitome of white privilege. Allegedly rape 20+ women, rip people off for tens of millions through a fake university, profiting off the Presidency. He uses his coons quite strategically, particularly that Kandy West character and the Candace Owens one. This is just Honkeytonking on steroids, showing the extent of what they can do and what we would have been burned at the stake for. Am I missing something with this? I keep seeing people repeat this in some form. Is this because he let Kim Kardashian's grandmother out of prison as a photo-op? Exactly. Again, if your paychecks come from white people, you are forced to obey them whether you want to or not. That's the main reason why all black celebrities (except Chappelle) are alphabet bandits or shoulder monkeys. That's why Kaepernick is so admirable. He stood on principle. I don't know what he's getting paid via Nike or what the NFL settlement was, but he took a stand and gave up white NFL money for black principles. A black agenda top three for me would be: 1) Reparations in the form of a $150,000 cash payment to each black American who can prove they are descendants of slaves. Its not that hard. My great grandmother lived from 1898-2001. Glad I had the wherewithal to pick her brain before she passed away and she was very sharp up until her death). 2) Reparations in the form of sovereign land within the USA. Annexing about 15,000 square miles in southern Mississippi, Alabama and the Florida panhandle would suffice. It would be the 51st State. That way we have a seaport. But only married black couples with kids or wanting to have kids are allowed on the land in the beginning; so likely about 3 million of us total. Goal is to preserve our heritage. It would need to be far enough inland though so it cannot be in the direct line of fire from hurricanes. We'll call it "New Nubia." 3) Annually $4 billion payment to New Nubia for our National Guard, construction and education costs. They do that for Israel already, so they can do that for us. New Nubia and its citizens are also exempt from federal taxes for the first 100 years of its existence. We're also exempt from US Gaming laws so we can have casinos to draw tourism dollars from white people. The total package would be about $5 to $7 trillion to get going. The US military would have to get the white inbreds out of our land initially and we'll take it from there once we've built our National Guard. Anything less than all this is simply an insult to our intelligence.
  38. 2 points
    Education, Jobs, Cultural Funding. I think the main problem Afro-Americans have is lack of indentity and or rather homeland. However you could argue that is hat has made as the most copied but not financially rewarded. I say Black folks in the US are Culture Whores. We create it but get pimped. Although that may not bring about a golden age. Since the system is designed for inequality. However there have been people who make it work. Although if you try to share the wealth there will be Sorrow Tears and Blood. @Chevdove Thanks for the mention
  39. 2 points
    Cindy, Dawn, Maxine, and Terry Terry, Maxine, Dawn and Cindy DON'T LET GO, En Vogue's greatest hit! Lead in this video is DAWN ROBINSON
  40. 2 points
    @Troy I've already updated several blog posts I've written or edited about Malcolm over the years and placed your link in them.
  41. 2 points
    I'll be skeptical until I see it. It only took six months for the "first black President" to reveal his true colors. If there's any sign of Roland Martins, Van Jones, or any of those MSNBC clowns on the BNC, its a hard pass for me. But I'll give it a chance.
  42. 2 points
    😆 @Pioneer1 Yes Kim Coles also graduated from Brooklyn Tech with me and Troy. Best. High. School. Ever. And yes - haven't you noticed we fight about and agree with each other on the topics dealing with the subject of "Social Engineering"... It's as if you and I both believe that we humans are consistently being programmed and hacked to behave a certain way. Sexuality goes right to the top of the social engineering ! Early Anglos found out how to harness and supress sensuality, sexuality and sensuosity and use it to create super soldiers /killing machines . In short, suppress sexuality you kill creativity and then you can create monsters. @Troy In a way, I agree but how we use our experiences is what's at odds. As a woman, I learned sexual boundaries in the safety of my parents home. When you are under a watchful eye of your caregivers - they let things go but so far. We've seen on social media where at some of parties teenaged boys and girls have gotten drunk and some boys have gone as far as gang raped girls. A lot of times these parties were not chaperoned - and what's worse those children didn't learn boundaries and popped like corks under pressure. Now the girls are scarred -and the boys have to register as sexual offenders for the rest of their life. My friends and I played RCK (run catch and kiss)- as young as 11... by the time we were teens - we knew boundaries. Boys knew sexual contact in varying degrees wasn't off limits because girls liked it too - but we all learned no means no. As society progressed - I guess some parents didn't have time for children anymore. But when I was growing up we all had parents to consult in the absence of our own (for the moment). It did take a village. Most of the kids I grew up with - played kissing games, bump and grinding when we were teenagers, and none of us ended up as sexual predators. When the child learns how to exercise their personal agency it will later serve them as adults. My body and persona doesn't belong to my parents - it's mine. My children's bodies doesn't belong to me or their dad. They learned this from the time they were toddlers. While they were under our care we had to let them determine their boundaries or they would never learn. Or worse, learn when they were older. If you wonder why some women exist in abusive relationships while some women NEVER experience that life;-it's all due to learning. We all have to learn - it just depends on when.
  43. 2 points
    @Mel Hopkins yes I was beautiful, and as a gymnast the athleticism was not lost on me. Yes I remember doing the "Freak," but we were not filiming it and watching it constantly. Did you think the freak was appropriate? I know at least one guy that ejaculated while freaking (no it was not me 😎). So while I don't disagree with anything you wrote Mel, I find it hard to believe you would host a party where your teenage daughters were dressed and dancing like that. Would you you let them "freak" or dance "rub-a-dub style" in the basement with the lights off? @Pioneer1 if you are familiar with those dance styles, same question.
  44. 2 points
    Greetings all, I read To Funk and Die in LA, and what a different read. I had never read a Nelson George novel, and I was not expecting the musical history lessons. The novel being written in third person also surprised me. The protagonist, D Hunter, was faced with several challenges and for the most part he pushed through. I enjoyed the LA lifestyle the text offered, and much like D, I would be a fish out of water in LA, but as the protagonist adjusted in the story so did I in the read. It was enjoyable meeting so many culturally different characters. The racial tension present in text was not expected, but one has to assume a city as diverse as LA must have different racial facets beyond the typical Black and white drama. I was also surprised by D Hunter’s HIV status and was impressed by how George worked into the plot with acceptance and concern. Dr. Funk’s creative stability even within his mental health issues was another shocker for me, but completely believable considering how creative genius exist. The only problem with the story was the delaying of the mystery, it was not always upfront for the protagonist, but on the other hand I really enjoyed the family and friends D related to daily. It was a good read and I would read another D Hunter mystery.
  45. 2 points
    Go Tell it on the Mountain by James Baldwin Fledgling by Octavia Butler Go Tell it on the Mountain by James Baldwin Fledgling by Octavia Butler
  46. 2 points
    We black women straighten hair or we don’t. We color our hair or we don’t. Sometimes in the same week! Beyonce at the Lion King Premiere 2019, Serena Williams at the royal wedding 2018. Mary J Blige (undated) BUT Women worldwide change their literal body parts to look like black women. So, that makes black women the standard. There is no low self-esteem when the world wants to look like you.
  47. 2 points
    @Mel Hopkins Will do! @Troy This would help me.
  48. 2 points
    @Pioneer1 life is complicated man. Often it is difficult to make sense of it. For example, I would love for the larger Black community to embrace what I do here simply because I'm a Black man against struggling against massive corporations, who intend to exploit us, to support Black culture and people here on the web. I just does not work that way. I see people on Twitter, for example retweeting and commenting on 45's nonsense. Sure they mean well but they are only helping Twitter and counterintuitively 45. I wish these very same people would retweet my posts that are actually promotes their work, or writers that they want supported. Some even advertise on the site. So it is not that they don't support, but too much of what we do with our energy and time can undermine what we do with our money. @Cynique's contributions here were prodigious. I named the forum for her (though I honestly I was a bit sadden by her using a typo on this honor as a passing swipe rather than her just letting me know). However she spends time on Facebook not once sharing any of her brilliant posts here on the platform. Why? Maybe she wanted to keep her online lives separate. It really does not matter. The bottom line is that most people do this. They easily share trivial utterances made on social media but rarely share major coverage here. They'll gladly do it when asked, but it is not automatic. Right niw I'm too busy maintaining the site to worry about a succession plan. If the last 20 years are an indicator, the next 20 will be rough. I do recognize people do not live forever. The reality is most businesses fail and the vast majoirity don't outlive their founders. Mult-gereational survival is not in AALBC's favor, but you've all given me something to think about 🙂 Thanks
  49. 2 points
    WOW!!! Another Record Setting TRACK BEAUTY Setting a Record 10.75! SHA'CARRI RICHARDSON! WOW!-- Sha' Carri just ran a 10.75!!! This brings back my memories of Flo Jo! I read though that today, Sha-Carri is rated one of the 9th fastest runners. I am amazed. _______________________________________________________________ ... Richardson finished the race at a record-breaking time of 10.75 seconds and didn't even have to cross the finish line to know she won. She raised her arms in celebration while she was still running and finished nearly five meters ahead of the rest of the field Richardson broke the world junior record, and her finish time makes her the ninth-fastest performer in the world. She also broke the NCAA record, which was set 30 years ago by former LSU sprinter Dawn Sowell at 10.78. http://www.msn.com/en-us/sports/more-sports/lsu-freshman-breaks-womens-100m-collegiate-record-in-1075-celebrates-early/ar-AACAP8M?li=BBnbfcL&ocid=AARDHP HERE'S THE VIDEO of her competing this past Saturday winning in 10.75 Oh and Uh, yes, she has BLONDE EXTENSIONS!!!-- LOL! I just realized that this trend of Black Track Beauties may be due to being able to recognize them on the track! Just a thought.
  50. 2 points
    The challenge with numbers is if applied wrongly can destroy us - since the only numbers I experiment with is in cooking - I'll leave it to the professionals and enthusiasts. Speaking of which, my oldest daughter's sister is at Harvard right now because she's some kind of math wiz... she's only 15 - I admire her - she probably knows about perfect numbers and their uses
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