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Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/03/2019 in Posts

  1. 4 points
    Those who have rarely been the target of organized police gangsterism are once again lecturing those who have about how best to respond to it. Be peaceful, they implore, as protesters rise up in Minneapolis and across the country in response to the killing of George Floyd. This, coming from the same people who melted down when Colin Kaepernick took a knee — a decidedly peaceful type of protest. Because apparently, when white folks say, “protest peacefully,” we mean “stop protesting.” Read the entire article by Tim Wise. https://medium.com/@timjwise/violence-never-works-really-e0af884c03b4
  2. 4 points
    We are all aware of the mainstream media's negative narrative about black men. We are constantly bombarded with stories of high incarceration rates, black on black violence, deadbeat dads and of course police brutality. From the outside looking in it appears that black men are destined for failure and there is nothing that can be done to change the implied negative trajectory that black men are on. But is the media's narrative true? Are black men really an endangered species? I believe the answer is an emphatic no and I have made it my life's to work to support and empower black men to overcome the negative stereotypes and to create extraordinary lives. In order for black men to succeed the first thing they must do is understand how societal conditioning contributes to creating a negative mindset and attitude about what it means to be a black man. Too many black men feel hopeless and powerless as a result of the constant barrage of negative images and stories coming not only from the white biased media but also from the black media that definitely contributes to the negative narratives about what it means to be black. So what can be done to support black men in overcoming the multiplicity of challenges they face on a daily basis? How can we help change the mindset of black men and empower them to know they have unlimited potential and the future is extremely bright for those who are willing to put forth the effort? I believe the key to resolving a large percentage of challenges facing black them is to support them in changing their own inner narrative about themselves. The good book says; "be ye not conformed to this world, but be ye transformed by the renewing of your mind." Herein lies the key to transforming black men's lives. We must be willing to encourage black men to examine the internal negative beliefs and perceptions they have about themselves. We must engage them in a dialog about what they believe, how they feel and what they think about being black. Too many times their inner dialog about themselves is so negative they have no choice other than to act out that negative internal dialog. Therefore it is incumbent upon us to change their inner dialog by providing resources that support them in changing their negative mindset and attitude. This can be accomplished through things like workshops and seminars, reading books, listening to audio programs and creating support groups that provide safe spaces for them to speak openly about the highs and lows, joys and pain of being a black man. When we help them change their inner dialog about themselves it will give them a sense of optimism and hope for the future which will then encourage them to develop a positive mindset and attitude that will keep them from falling victim to negative media generated narratives about who they are. It is definitely possible for any black man to live an extraordinary life. We are all capable of creating inner peace, dynamic health, great relationships and financial abundance. To do so, a black man must be willing to take 100% responsibility for his life turning out the way he wants it to. The only way to do this is through changing his inner narrative about himself and recognizing that he has the capacity to do anything he sets his mind to.
  3. 4 points
    The first 24 hour Black News Channel is expected to launch November 15, 2019 @6:00 AM. The cable network is the brainchild of J.C. Watts, Jr., former U.S Representative (R-Oklahoma) now BNC chairman and Veteran Journalist Bob Brilliante who will serve as the cable network's CEO. BNC Newsroom management made their rounds at the National Association Black Journalists Job fair in Miami, FL earlier this month. The news channel, headquartered in Tallahassee, Fl, will broadcast to 33 million households nationwide with a major presence in Los Angeles, Atlanta and New York. ~MH You can read the release here: https://blacknewschannel.com/wp-content/uploads/BNC_NABJ-Press-Release_2019.pdf
  4. 3 points
  5. 3 points
  6. 3 points
    It is not the biggest home office I ever had, but it is the most comfortable. While I miss socializing, I also appreciate how truly lucky I am. I'm not saying I don't have challenges, but relatively speaking... I called a longtime buddy of mine yesterday, a physician, he is in the hospital, on oxygen, as a result of Covid19. He told me he had gotten so sick that he wished he had died. Fortunately, he will recover. My friend is wealthy. I think about all the poor people, in his situation, that have died painful deaths, alone, and scared. Will this prompt Americans to fight stop a system that increase wealthy inequality and has millions without health insurance? ----- This is the kind of thing would have shared on social media were I still using it for personal reasons. I never really considered it, but these forums is my "social media." I haven't written a Blog post since August of 2019. Pretty much anything I have to say, I say it here. Stay healthy fam.
  7. 3 points
    Cynique writes, "Tell all of my AALBC 'frienenemies' I said, "stay well." I know we all (at least I have) have been jonesing to read something from Cynique about the passing scene: “Welcome to 2020! I always knew things would catch up with this country, but I never imagined that I would be around to see it. Unlike some, however, i don't believe a conspiracy theory is at work via the new world order; the inevitable has just come to pass. I don't think the USA will ever be the same after this pandemic, and the shit is really gonna hit the fan come election time. But, whatever. I'll be doing good to even be around in November. So far, i haven't exhibited any corona symptoms and like everybody else, I'm social distancing myself on voluntary quarantine. If the virus doesn't get me, my intense loathing for Trump might bring me down. I.DESPISE.HIM. I can't believe how the Universe has put him in place as a leader during this time of crises. But with his luck, he might just emerge smelling like a rose when this new flu proves to be much ado about nothing and that the real disaster was our overreaction to it. Me and my cynicism do find the way the media is handling it to be a bit much. Yet, I have mixed emotions. In addition to the radiation being emitted by cell phone towers being the origin of the virus, another one of the theories out there on FaceBook is that if your ears are ringing, you are getting signals from unseen forces about to take over Earth, and my ears are really picking up a lot of static! Oh, well, i always did think I was an alien. And the bizarre supernatural activity that continues to occur within the walls of my bedroom in the middle of the night are very unnerving... “
  8. 3 points
    I appreciate you guys allowing me to become a part of this endeavor. I love my people and remain seriously concerned for our future. Here and in Africa.
  9. 3 points
    AAAAHHHHH! I LOVE CHERYL CROW! No you didn't!!! LOL. Man! That was so good! Such a release! Man! Thank you @Kareem @Maurice Thank you for posting. WHEW! WHEW! I LOVE THE BEATLES. Man! I could listend to 'Hey Jude' over and over and over... This has made my day!!! Lol! I ain't listening to no mo!--for now because I won't stop. I love CHIC and KC & the Sunshine Band. Man!
  10. 3 points
    This song and Baez's sound reminds me of Sheryl Crow, who I really like. I'll listen to more of Joan Baez based on your recommendation. There were a lot of folksy ladies like this in the early 1990s along with Sheryl Crow. The 10,000 Maniacs (Natalie Merchant) are also high on my early 90s favorites. Truth be told, one of my first girlfriends when I was very young was a white chick who played the violin. So 10,000 Maniacs kind of reminds me of that! But I've always loved the sound of violins and other string instruments (cello, viola, etc.). Nile Rodgers in the late 1970s used them all to perfection in his music, and it's always cute white chicks playing those violins and violas! Again there will never be another 70s or 80s. The talent to compose and perform the music, the love, the respect between black and white...all that cannot exist today...sadly. We tried so hard in the USA to fix racism in the 70s and 80s. The powers-that-be just didn't want that to happen. In sum...
  11. 3 points
    At the risk of 'jumping in', I'd like to welcome you back even though Ive only been a member for six months now. Greetings from South East England.
  12. 3 points
    I'm reading a few books but am primarily focused on Evil Never Sleeps: Tales of Light and Darkness, by Robert Fleming. Robert is one of America’s most accomplished writers. He has written poetry, novels, nonfiction articles, and has reviewed over 60 books for AALBC. His work spans over 40 years. It seems to me that writers like Robert should be better known, but he is just your run of the mill late-middle-aged Black man {yawn}. He’s not Caribbean or African, he’s not LGBT, he does not have a white parent, he can’t rap or dunk a basketball, he wasn’t gang banger or previously incarcerated. He is the kind of writer that I always complain about being ignored by the mainstream media. Robert's accomplishments will never go viral on twitter despite his significant contributions to our literature.
  13. 3 points
    @Pioneer1 You may be right. Black discussion forums are rapidly becoming a thing of the past. I revisited a post, not even two years old, where someone who ran a discussion forum ranked a few others. Half the forums have shut down -- including the one run by the person who made the post. Connie summed it up best she has more fun on Facebook. The part about typos on posts here, while true, is also true on facebook. That really is the bottom line. For the vast majority of social media users I observe in real life - who pass me their phone to share something funny they saw on some social site. Of course these sites are designed to highly engage folks and they work very well. Fast growing platforms like TikTok are completely driven by entertaining videos. Facebook's mobile feed attempts to mimic this but they can't... ultimately people will leave Facebook too. During the peak of this forum, I would regularly laugh out loud by something I read here, but I could also learn something. There was humourous posts, serious ones, and everything in between. Most importantly, at least to me, is that this platform is Black-owned and independent. I'm a child of the 60s, who grew up in the segregated northern ghetto of Harlem. So Black independence is a thing I find to be important. This is a sentiment that is dying along with indie Black focused and owned websites. One reason independence is important is that businesses like AALBC provides opportunities for people. The writers, editors, and others I pay are not being paid by the likes of a Mark Zuckerberg. Of course AALBC's ability to do this is adversely impacted the dominace of Google, Amazon, and social. Fortunately, individuals whether they are sponsors, site vistors, or contributors to this forum are the people who keep this site alive. If you are reading this thank YOU for helping to keep this site alive! Also, thank you on behalf of the writers whose work you support, but who will probably never fully appreciate your impact.
  14. 2 points
    AFRICAN AMERICANS DON'T GAZE ON IT!--DIRECT YOUR FOCUS How do you encourage young people during a time like this!? One thing I know for sure though, is that it is absolutely NOT good to continue to look at the video and images of DEATH and DYING especially of the recent horrific deaths of a young man in Georgia and of the Gentle Giant George Floyd that was filmed. EXERCISE SELF CONTROL. That's how I directed my sons a few days ago. DO NOT WATCH THOSE VIDEOS but certainly some one needs to watch them who is spiritually strong enough to deal with these issues. Look at the script, news reports occasionally but don't obsess on what has happened rather, DIRECT YOUR FOCUS on a positive aspect of how to deal with evil. And WHAT DO YOU KNOW, but the next day after I spoke to my sons, I saw an article of a famous American coach named Steve Kerr and he pretty much said the same thing! Steve Kerr can’t watch it, and Stan Van Gundy doesn’t need to. Many black people have to keep away from it, because watching yet another video of an African American being killed at the hands of the state strips away at their souls and state of mind — that it can happen at any point with very little recourse. https://www.yahoo.com/sports/steve-kerr-stan-van-gundy-trying-to-do-their-part-to-fight-racial-injustice-161711972.html “I don't watch the videos. Too difficult, too painful,” Kerr said. “I read about the situations and then I try to at least add my name to anything that might be able to help in some positive way.” https://www.yahoo.com/sports/steve-kerr-stan-van-gundy-trying-to-do-their-part-to-fight-racial-injustice-161711972.html …“Let's face it, we're a nation founded on slavery,” he said. “If we think that because slavery was abolished, that's the end of it, we're just blind to the reality of it. Modern society is directly impacted by centuries of racism, and slavery. https://www.yahoo.com/sports/steve-kerr-stan-van-gundy-trying-to-do-their-part-to-fight-racial-injustice-161711972.html
  15. 2 points
    Years ago, while still in college, a "foine" sister I was infatuated with, recommended that I read The Clan of the Cave Bear. It was not a book I would have ever picked up on my own in fact the title made no sense to me. For no other reason than her recommendation, I read and ultimately and I enjoyed the book a great deal. The story and the woman are perhaps the only reason I recall the book to this day The book, like all books I really enjoy is a love story. In this case familial love. Not one of biology, but adoption. It is not like any adoption story that you'll ever read. The story came to my mind during a dragged out debate I'm having with @Chevdove, who believes that Neanderthals are still among us rather than being extinct as all the current scientific data tells us. What I did not know when reading this story, over 35 years ago was that it tells the story of a Homo Sapien girl being adopted by an Neathanderthal clan [my take thinking back on the story]. It really is a brilliant story and I highlighly recommend it. Side bar: Now I don't sell this book on AALBC, so I can't post a link to this title here on this site (technically I could but I don't feel like adding this book to my database). In the past, I would have simply linked readers to Amazon, but since I'm boycotting Amazon, now I figure it is a good time to test the Bookshop affiliate program, which has been getting so much press lately. As a bookseller, I could not think of any benefits of Bookshop to AALBC, at least until now. I'll experiment with linking readers to bookshop for books that I recommend, but do not plan to stock or sell, because they are outside the scope of books we cover on AALBC.
  16. 2 points
    Thanks for watching folks. And thank you for the feedback. Link should be in the BAIA newsletter that goes out. Its also on the home page of BAIA. New eps every Tuesday
  17. 2 points
  18. 2 points
    LATEST BLOW TO BOOK INDUSTRY Update- 3/31/2020 - “A” has ordered a few books from a publisher I know, one tenth of their usual order. There is no such thing as a “kind” slave master. Sell your books through your own website. Hello from Amazon, We are closely monitoring the developments of COVID-19 and its impact on our customers, selling partners, and employees. We are seeing increased online shopping, and as a result products such as household staples and medical supplies are out of stock. With this in mind, we are temporarily prioritizing household staples, medical supplies, and other high demand products coming into our fulfillment centers so that we can more quickly receive, restock and deliver these products to customers. Beginning today you will see: Reduced Purchase Orders: We have temporarily paused ordering for products that are not household staples, medical supplies, or other high demand products. Extended delivery windows for existing purchase orders: We have extended the shipment/delivery windows for some existing purchase orders to give you more time to fulfill the order. Please ship your products toward the end of the extended window. This will be in effect today through April 5, 2020, and we will let you know once we resume regular operations. We understand this is a change to your business, and we did not take this decision lightly. We are working around the clock to increase capacity, and on March 16 announced that we are opening 100,000 new full- and part-time positions in our fulfillment centers across the US. We appreciate your understanding as we prioritize the above products for our customers. Thank you for your patience, Amazon (Okay, Troy and Mel, you were right. It is a tag. But the box with the pull up menu is on this screen, it's not on the other one.)
  19. 2 points
    @Chevdove I ditto that. Please don't edit youself cause two old fuddie duddies don't share your sense of humor. @Pioneer1 i always said the culture wants to feminize men. The more you can get men in the salons buying products and the stores buying trendy fashions, getting piercings and fancy hairstyles and their tie nails painted the more money you can make of them. The ideal of what is feminine is a white man's construct. This ideal is the one that you embrace @Pioneer1. Things changed substantially for white women as they gained more rights. Black wpmen benfited too but were never really considered the feminine idea... by the larger society.... but that what Black men are here for 😉
  20. 2 points
    Lol....ASK and ye shall receive. Can a brutha get a drum-roll for his long awaited "official" statement on the Kareem situation? Look, whether or not Kareem is/was indeed a troll is not for me to say because I'm in no position to know for sure, however I WILL say this... Talking about being heavily armed and going out in blazes of glory not ony makes you a potential target but draws attention to whatever platform (organization, family, website, religion, ect.....) you express yourself in. And to a lesser degree even promoting certain conspiracies (whether they're true or false) will also draw attention to you AND the site you're on and that attention may not necessarily be from the people you want it from! Also, if you want to post something reckless you must understand that even after you've gone on, the problems your carelessness has caused remains for others to deal with. As I've gotten older I've learned that even if YOU don't give a damn about the consequences, it's always wise to be considerate of those around you and what THEY may have to endure after you're long gone. Also, we have to be careful about the term "troll" because it means too many things for too many people. For some, a "troll" is just someone who gets a kick out of annoying other people and will purposely say inflammatory things to get a reaction. For others, a "troll" is an agent sent into a community to purposely spread misinformation or post illegal information for the purposes of getting a site flagged and possibly in trouble. But in my opinion these type of individuals aren't "trolls" but AGENTS and should be refered to or atleast seen as such. Again, not pinning EITHER definition on Kareem because as far as I'm concerned he's a brother with strong opinion as far as I KNOW.....but since the subject came up I'm speaking on the issue in general.
  21. 2 points
    @Pioneer1 I never left! I decided it was wiser to spend my time on other areas on this website, where I could help and also learn what others are doing in the book world. I don't argue with supremacist folks of any shade and for a while this forum (culture, race and economy) was traveling that path. Calling people coons, uncle toms, ni--ers, colonizers, crackers, (dang there are'nt many derogatory names for Angles that don't include them being in a superior position over black folks, is there? LOL but I digress)- because of their differing life perspective doesn't help any of us. Black Supremacy is as hateful as white supremacy. Hate and fear are way too draining, divisive and mentally harmful. If we couple that with Alex Jones-type alternative theories especially the unsolvable theories then we're all doomed. I'm all for considering alternative theories but if they are not meant to help us evolve then what? For example, if coronavirus is engineered/modified. - SO WHAT? A lot of viruses are engineered/modified for health reasons - such as gene therapy. For years domestic animals such as cats and dogs have been vaccinated against the coronavirus . Are we talking about that modified virus? Anyway, if we're going to talk about solutions then I'm all in...but just talking about what somebody is allegedly doing to us - makes us victims...and I ain't got time to talk about reinforcing my victimization.
  22. 2 points
    I am in complete agreement with you. Why did booksellers, writers, and independent publishers decide to hand their power over to one distributor? When "B" started the business he said that he was going to destroy the book business first. He said it would be easy, because it was full of English Majors.
  23. 2 points
    You beat me to the punch @Wendy Jones i was gonna share this today. Amazon's effective monopoly over the sale of independenly published Black books is now they can decide when it is important to stock, sell, and ship them. As long as USPS, UPS, FEDEX, and any number of other delivery services are out there AALBC, nor any other bookseller, has to slow down your book delivery. Amazon stocking fewer books and delaying delivery is only a problem for authors because they put all their eggs in one basket -- Amazon's I'm still doing three day delivery on the books in my store and im getting more customers everyday.
  24. 2 points
    DISCUSSION FORUMS STELLAR - SCREEN FATIGUE IS THE PROBLEM Before I let you know why I haven't been participating in the discussion forums, I want to express my gratitude to African American Literature Book Club. I found my editor and publicist here. Troy did the research to include the WBAI David Rothenberg interview on my author’s page, even though I had forgotten to send it to him. The review that was published on AALBC, though not completely positive, was professionally written. A professional review gives the reviewer’s opinion of the book with supportive evidence from the book while giving enough information for the reader to decide if s/he is interested in the book. The reviewer did that, which resulted in sales of An Extraordinary Life: Josephine E. Jones. One of those sales resulted in a reunion with a beloved writer mentee. Another sale resulted in a fine correspondence—which continues until this day—with an admirer of the book who has also been very supportive of my career. Thank you. I was briefly on Facebook and LinkedIn for business, but ran away screaming. Facebook seemed intrusive to me. After I left, they followed me for six months online. LinkedIn sent emails to everyone in my inbox, which resulted in contact from someone I never wanted to hear from in this life or the next. Although I am still on Goodreads, I am not very active. When I visited their forums I was appalled at the childishness of the exchanges. It reminded me of third grade playground fights. Then I came to this community. Discussions were at a high level, included sources, and--whether I agreed with the writers or not--the conversations were always civil. There was so much variety, and you could start a new topic. Engaging people with differing perspectives was exhilarating. I will never forget the series of discussions Troy, another community member, and I had with a young man about his views on gay people. We didn’t change his mind, but I hope he at least reexamined his beliefs. Who could forget the life changing discussions about “A” and its devastating effect on booksellers, readers, and writers? Your discussion forums increased my brain cells. I spent days creating responses in my head. Then I typed them up in Word and revised them. After that, I cut and pasted them into the forums. Recently, I created a STAY AT HOME RESOURCE KIT on my website for my email list. I will discuss the details of that in another post. I think a custom tailored version of it would work for other writers. One element of the kit included recommended links. Here is what I put on my website: Discover the joys of the 21st Century’s version of the 18th Century salon. Then I copied the block of text from AALBC’s website giving details about the site and put the link on my website. For the past two years, I have been giving readings of An Extraordinary Life: Josephine E. Jones for Black History Month Programs at libraries and added a college this year. In addition, I also scheduled my first Women’s History Month Program this year, which was postponed because of COVID-19. Wherever I go, I have been telling writers and readers about your website, with particular mention of the forums. In other words, although I wasn’t on the forums, I was sending as many people to them as I could. I don’t think the discussion forums can be improved. They are already excellent. The problem lies not with your discussion forums, but with my screen fatigue. Like most people, I spend a great deal of time on screens: the computer and the phone. I don’t have a TV, but watch movies, documentaries, TV programs, and videos on the computer. I am looking forward to watching an Oscar Micheaux film on Youtube later tonight. Except for occasional trips to bookstores, most of my research is done on a computer screen at home or at the library. I don’t have other devices, but still spend more time than I’d like on screens. When I was working on An Extraordinary Life: Josephine E. Jones, I had to get special computer glasses to ease the fatigue of reading the digital proof files my copy editor sent me. I felt as if I my eyeballs were walking on sand. I am wearing those glasses now. After awhile, I don’t want to see another screen. I just want to put on my regular glasses, sit in my wing chair, prop my feet on the footstool, and read Looking for Lorraine. (If this ends up with a "tag"[I don't think that's the correct term-my research described the "at" sign with the name as a tag] it will be another accident.)
  25. 2 points
    Whether its ACA or otherwise, average white people's wealth almost doubled under Obama, and continues upward under Trump. Black people are still near ZERO today for wealth. Obviously being forced to pay for something when you have no money to begin with is a financial burden. White people gained more money under Obama, thus didn't take a hit being forced to buy insurance, which does nothing more than enrich the executives at Blue Cross/Blue Shield, Pfizer, Johnson & Johnson, etc.
  26. 2 points
    Azacotogan What you don't seem to see is that if I have to "provide evidence" of African concepts to an "African" then it is already a lost proposition. ....and most of our people are lost. The fact that most Africans in the West are "lost" to the knowledge of not only their own culture and spirituality but indeed THEMSELVES should be enough reason to readily provide valuable knowledge to any African who sincerely enquires. I am an African, not black, as you called yourself. There's HUGE difference from a psychological perspective. You're new to this site. If you stick around a while you'll realize that I actually DO call myself an African. I just use the term "Black" in conversation with many people to avoid confusion because despite it being an innaccurate term, it is the most commonly understood term for our people in English speaking society. But it's clear now you're not going to get it. Maybe not now....... I used karma as a reference because most have a general idea of it but not because the two are parallel Kind of like how I use the terms "African" and "Black". Where are you getting information from? There is no African culture that I know of that has this stance on these things. It certainly isn't like that in Vodun. You are just speculating. There is so much more to these things in Vodun but you write as though you have it all figured out. Smh. But you are focusing on karma. The article is about salawa Exactly what part of my statement that you are commenting on is false or inaccurate? You think that I have to share certain experiences I've had with you as strong evidence that what I'm saying is correct? No, you don't "have" to. But it would be nice. You come on here and promote your spiritual concepts yet refuse to share key aspects of the spiritual abilities you should be receiving from it. Anybody who is able bodied can just "go through the motions" but how do we KNOW that what we practice is truly spiritually transforming if it doesn't bring you face to face with THE spiritual kingdom? Are you serious? Yes, show me the money. That's your criteria? Part of it. That could easily be made up. I could tell you anything and you would have no way of truly knowing if what I'm telling you is the truth. However I've dealt with spirituality and spiritual people enough to recognize whether or not your experiences share the same patterns with those who ARE legitimate.....which would lend more credibility to your claims.   Not clear what you're referring to but in general if an African refers to themselves as any kind of american then caucasians have succeeded in conquering their Ori African is a race, American is a nationality....the two can easily be reconciled.
  27. 2 points
    You're not wrong there. Sometimes,I'm sitting there with a particular album on and I think how lucky I am. A real and authentic age of music. This baby arrived less than a week ago and I'm giving it its first airing right now. WOW.
  28. 2 points
    2020: Everyone will have perfect vision. No glasses or contact lenses are needed. It’s 2020, a universal year for order: laying a solid foundation to build and grow. Collectivity and balance, oneness in thought and action. The heart should be balanced on the scales of justice to let go, grow and flow. Let go of those memories that attach to the past stagnation that prevents change for the better. Forgive and be forgiven. Love and be loved. Let the artist out. Get into your rhythm, your music. Harmonize, build, grow and unite. Love is in demand, Be complete. All the bestAubrey Doris 20 are even, and 19 is odd. Even numbers are considered feminine and receptive.
  29. 2 points
    For years I've been maintaining a list of the most popular Black-owned websites. That list of 50 websites is actually derived from a much longer list of over 300 websites. The idea was to track the web's largest Black-owned websites who attracted the most visitors. Again, I started the list years ago and expected it to grow, but to a point where it would be difficult to manage. Despite the pages being one of the most popular on the website, the list has actually been shrinking! I have to review the list periodically to check for websites that are no longer active. Usually the domains are quickly snapped up by other, often unrelated, websites trying to take advantage of the traffic obtained from backlinks from sites like mine or links lead to nowhere and are broken. In any event I have to check the links from time to time. This time I was disheartened to see many sites that I really liked disappear. I removed 20 websites from the list including, ChickenBones: A Journal, which was started in 2001, by Rudolph Lewis. We became friendly over the years as we started a few years apparty (AALBC started in 1997) and published similar content. His content will be a great loss to the web. I already reached out to him to avoid this. Another site I removed from the list, is MelaNet not because the domain is down, but the site has simply not updated in years and is full of broken links. Launched in 1997 MelaNet was one of the first Black websites that I can remember. It was also exciting to see because it produced content that I simply was not exposed to before the web was created -- it was as pro-Black and afrocentric as you could get. One of the better book sites on the web APOOO (A Place of Our Own), was started in 2008 and was in a class of book websites you do not see very much today. These sites were popular, well done, and driven my passionate readers. They provided reviews and interviews. Some of these sites migrated to social media, but those platforms are so restrictive and are a poor facsimile of the former websites. I could go on and on. I always lament the fact that the Web is a far less rich place due to the lost of indie websites. Even the indie websites that have survived that last 10 or 20 years are not as good as they can be. Clearly the average person on the web has no clue what has been lost -- otherwise there would be some outrage. I point to the corporate domination (ownership really) of the World Wide Web as the cause. I described in the past how Google, in a single day, took about 75% of my traffic (along with other Black owned book sites, newspapers and other entities). It took my site over 5 years to recover. Many of the other websites just folded or failed to recover. For many people today, the World Wide Web is comprised solely of Amazon, Google, and a few social media sites. There are still some good and potentially great websites. All we have to do it is take advantage of them.
  30. 2 points
    Hey @Marion Hill here is a link to all the event on the "Circuit" that I'm aware of: https://aalbc.com/events/list.php/ The list also includes the festivals of many types around the world, but you have no problem identifying the event on the "Circuit." 😉 @Mel Hopkins I'm unsure too, but perhaps you are right.
  31. 2 points
    Commitment: Can I get you to make me a promise? Can I get you to see passed the undertaking of my hearts desires? I promise you love and devotion, which by today’s society is far from the norm. In becoming attentive to the needs of others, one can cause self-harm. My loyalty is more than the trust that I extent to the dedication called us. Faithfulness is the underdog of fidelity when adherence is no longer a must. My resolve said you are worth the time sacrificed, but do I take what is given at the cost of a life. We were supposed to walk as one, an allegiance standing its ground, refusing to retreat. However the bond that brought us back to heel was a facility to the pain, which was real. Your pledge an oath told to the old that promised fairytales to the very young, was the contract that promised mystic retreats had me rethinking the pact that you had made with me. So many decisions were made back then and I was amazed you consider me a friend. I guaranteed you me at the cost of them, not contemplating the contract end. The resolution was supposed to bring me peace of mind but is was only affirmation of a kinder time when you could feel me in the breeze of the night and the vows we made said we’d be alright. Yet reality has a way of creeping in with no assurance of where ties begin. It is only a burden when duty pressures an engagements end, and the arrangements made were to consider the obligation of a lifelong friend. Never the less, here we sit hand in hand with the future untold. We considered the undertaking that was pressed upon us, and welcomed the moment we both got old. The memories that we would never rewrite because in the commitment we learn to fight. Those fights made us bold, and in them we learned to stay beyond the words and pain, the commitment to the future that we never thought we’d see, still makes me think this way. A committed friend.
  32. 2 points
    @Mel Hopkins Yeah Living Single was one of the last network sitcoms that I regularly watched. Kim was certainly Black Famous back when the show aired. Do you think she is Black famous amongst millennials and younger? Eric Jerome Dickey is probably Black Famous amongst readers. Do you think he is Black famous amongst the Black general public? Do you think AALBC is Black famous within the the group of avid readers who are also active online? Sometimes I'll run into a Black author who is promoting a book and says they are unfamiliar with my website and I'll joking say something like, "well you must not use the world wide web?" Sometimes that is actually the case, usually with an older person. Other times it is a combination of how the person used the web and how they web actually works. People tend to gravitate to the biggest websites and everything on the web serves to elevate the biggest sites. You need the white co-sign to become famous. Increasingly however -- especially on the web you need the white co-sign to become "Black famous." The celebs of "Black Twitter" would, of course, not be possible without Twitter. The same could reasonably be said for the start of Black Lives Matter. Black Chitlin' Circuit events for books makes it possible for writers to become Black Famous. Without these events it would be very difficult for a writer to have a career based solely upon writing. These events help raise the profile of AALBC -- which is why I do these events. That plus I love being around Black folk who have a passion for stories and knowledge.
  33. 2 points
    I've done this too. Recently I asked paid advertisers to supply links to their site (or use an AALBC page) rather than using an Amazon link. Most have agreed to do this. It seems that people get it when you tell them. This was not the case a few years ago. The tide seems to be changing. Sometimes, however, the author's goal is to make one of Amazon's best sellers lists, so directing readers, in this instance, to an alternative store is not possible. Given that Amazon has a bestsellers list for every category (thousands) some careful planning and pricing by an author can result in a #1 Amazon best selling book. Having a #1 Amazon bestselling book is as prestigious as making the New York Times Best Sellers list in some quarters. The problem with the NY Times list is that it is, naturally, biased against Black books and independently published books, these books typically don't make the shelves of the stores that report to the NY Times. AALBC reports to the Times, but my sales are not enough impact the list (The AALBC bestseller Sulwe, make the list during the period I reported 😀). Imagine, if book promoters directed readers to buy books from AALBC and other stores that report to the Times. We could impact the list and build the Black Book Ecosystem at the same time. Then again, imagine if the AALBC Best selling Books List, published since 1998, carried the same clout in our community as Amazon's or the New York Times' lists. Imagine...
  34. 2 points
    I know I've mentioned this several times. But white imperial society rewards coonery and acquiescence. This woman is being rewarded by white liberals for her promotion of homophilia among black people. I'd also like to point out that Botham Jean's brother, the coon who hugged the white killer cop in court, was rewarded by white conservatives this week when he received an "Ethical Courage Reward" from a Texas police union. Crazy living in this world.
  35. 2 points
  36. 2 points
    Curves touched pressed into mine, your hand slowly moving along the arch of my spine. A tiny gap appears between my thighs, a twist of my lips; it is a glimpse of moments that have you asking why. A pair of large breast pointed up toward the sky, silk wrapped mounds are the reflection of my hips in your eyes. Caressing the back of the neck, the tasting of earlobes are a thought to reflect. Exploring the essence of the whine as it create its own lyrics begging to not be alone, Tongues intertwine to dance in one place as your hand venture into my secret space where the tune of my movements are as whimpers in the dark where the shadow of the moon tap the clit and the heart. Climactic explosions of melodies made are the twirling of two areolas as the nipples displayed. Pulling up on the waist as the body collides. The flinch to the jerk is the strike of ecstasy’s mind. then the spirit so provoked as to spin in space and the mind body and soul race back to that place where delights has them all begging for more. Yet, the thoughts of the moment repeating its self keeps them unsure. Did it happen? Was this foreplay real? Did you make love to my mind? it was so surreal. This was my thoughts at just hello, makes a girl step back to consider for him how far she will go. You had me at hello.
  37. 2 points
    The World Is Rated X -Marvin Gaye After all these years of listening to Marvin, I discovered this shit a few months ago and can't get enough of that song. Been playing it over and over again. Maurice You mentioned Funkadelic....Cosmic Slop is the shit!
  38. 2 points
    @Troy No, the Kindle handles Amazon's ebook format, Mobi. Kobo uses the open format Epub. Epub is not Kobo's epub is for anyone to use, Kobo reads epub and pdf's. Kindle read Mobi and pdf. That is what i meant about amazon. They knew being first to have an ereader, they had a chance to use their own ebook format exclusively. Epub was made and is used mostly throughout the industry. But in the usa, the market of amazon pulls toward mobi while outside the usa it is epub.
  39. 2 points
    I actually attended Quincy Troupe's reading on Tuesday. It actually was an interesting event in park... Well it is not really a "park" in the sense anyone outside of NYC would think of one, but it is an oasis a break from the density popular concrete that surrounds. The park is near iconic FlatIron building (the former home of St. Martin's Press) and very close to where I teach Baruch College (which is why I went).
  40. 2 points
    I just don't see any difference at all between any of these people. The only President in history I have any respect for is JFK and I wasn't even alive back then. He's just the epitome of white privilege. Allegedly rape 20+ women, rip people off for tens of millions through a fake university, profiting off the Presidency. He uses his coons quite strategically, particularly that Kandy West character and the Candace Owens one. This is just Honkeytonking on steroids, showing the extent of what they can do and what we would have been burned at the stake for. Am I missing something with this? I keep seeing people repeat this in some form. Is this because he let Kim Kardashian's grandmother out of prison as a photo-op? Exactly. Again, if your paychecks come from white people, you are forced to obey them whether you want to or not. That's the main reason why all black celebrities (except Chappelle) are alphabet bandits or shoulder monkeys. That's why Kaepernick is so admirable. He stood on principle. I don't know what he's getting paid via Nike or what the NFL settlement was, but he took a stand and gave up white NFL money for black principles. A black agenda top three for me would be: 1) Reparations in the form of a $150,000 cash payment to each black American who can prove they are descendants of slaves. Its not that hard. My great grandmother lived from 1898-2001. Glad I had the wherewithal to pick her brain before she passed away and she was very sharp up until her death). 2) Reparations in the form of sovereign land within the USA. Annexing about 15,000 square miles in southern Mississippi, Alabama and the Florida panhandle would suffice. It would be the 51st State. That way we have a seaport. But only married black couples with kids or wanting to have kids are allowed on the land in the beginning; so likely about 3 million of us total. Goal is to preserve our heritage. It would need to be far enough inland though so it cannot be in the direct line of fire from hurricanes. We'll call it "New Nubia." 3) Annually $4 billion payment to New Nubia for our National Guard, construction and education costs. They do that for Israel already, so they can do that for us. New Nubia and its citizens are also exempt from federal taxes for the first 100 years of its existence. We're also exempt from US Gaming laws so we can have casinos to draw tourism dollars from white people. The total package would be about $5 to $7 trillion to get going. The US military would have to get the white inbreds out of our land initially and we'll take it from there once we've built our National Guard. Anything less than all this is simply an insult to our intelligence.
  41. 2 points
    I just gave away my copy of Marable's book (I often gift books to guests who come to my home). Marable's book was particularly controversial because it mentioned (or implied I never actually read the specific text), that Malcolm has sex with white men for money. A Lie of Reinvention: Correcting Manning Marable’s Malcolm X by Jared Ball and Todd Steven Burroughs corrects issues raised by Marable. Marable died just before the book was published. I often wondered about his untimely death in the context of the publication of his book. The Crisis of the Negro Intellectual: A Historical Analysis of the Failure of Black Leadership by Harold Cruse was a classic. I bet Cruse could go to town in 2019!
  42. 2 points
    @Mel Hopkins yes I was beautiful, and as a gymnast the athleticism was not lost on me. Yes I remember doing the "Freak," but we were not filiming it and watching it constantly. Did you think the freak was appropriate? I know at least one guy that ejaculated while freaking (no it was not me 😎). So while I don't disagree with anything you wrote Mel, I find it hard to believe you would host a party where your teenage daughters were dressed and dancing like that. Would you you let them "freak" or dance "rub-a-dub style" in the basement with the lights off? @Pioneer1 if you are familiar with those dance styles, same question.
  43. 2 points
    Go Tell it on the Mountain by James Baldwin Fledgling by Octavia Butler Go Tell it on the Mountain by James Baldwin Fledgling by Octavia Butler
  44. 2 points
    We black women straighten hair or we don’t. We color our hair or we don’t. Sometimes in the same week! Beyonce at the Lion King Premiere 2019, Serena Williams at the royal wedding 2018. Mary J Blige (undated) BUT Women worldwide change their literal body parts to look like black women. So, that makes black women the standard. There is no low self-esteem when the world wants to look like you.
  45. 2 points
  46. 2 points
    @Pioneer1 life is complicated man. Often it is difficult to make sense of it. For example, I would love for the larger Black community to embrace what I do here simply because I'm a Black man against struggling against massive corporations, who intend to exploit us, to support Black culture and people here on the web. I just does not work that way. I see people on Twitter, for example retweeting and commenting on 45's nonsense. Sure they mean well but they are only helping Twitter and counterintuitively 45. I wish these very same people would retweet my posts that are actually promotes their work, or writers that they want supported. Some even advertise on the site. So it is not that they don't support, but too much of what we do with our energy and time can undermine what we do with our money. @Cynique's contributions here were prodigious. I named the forum for her (though I honestly I was a bit sadden by her using a typo on this honor as a passing swipe rather than her just letting me know). However she spends time on Facebook not once sharing any of her brilliant posts here on the platform. Why? Maybe she wanted to keep her online lives separate. It really does not matter. The bottom line is that most people do this. They easily share trivial utterances made on social media but rarely share major coverage here. They'll gladly do it when asked, but it is not automatic. Right niw I'm too busy maintaining the site to worry about a succession plan. If the last 20 years are an indicator, the next 20 will be rough. I do recognize people do not live forever. The reality is most businesses fail and the vast majoirity don't outlive their founders. Mult-gereational survival is not in AALBC's favor, but you've all given me something to think about 🙂 Thanks
  47. 2 points
    @Pioneer1 you've demonstrated your support for the site, in ways others can never know, beyond just engaging here. I would not be surpirised if @Cynique posted here again nor would I think less of her for doing so. My kids, like most people their generation, express liite interest in what I do here. That does not mean that they don't love me. It just means that they will not be taking over the site. If I were to keel over today, unfortunately, the site would die with me. Unfortunately, as Pioneer wrote, this is how we do.
  48. 2 points
    I agree somewhat with the writer who said "most Black people don't read'. I find that most people, in particular young people, only read a book when it's absolutely necessary (i.e. - if required by a teacher). I, on the other hand, am a member of a Bookclub that will be celebrating it's 25th Anniversary next year in 2020. We read all kinds of books by African-American authors and people of color, once a month. We have turnover but remain consistent with about 20 members, and I would be remiss if I didn't note that we are supported by our local library. This is where we meet and it is an open opportunity for anyone in the community, but the members tend to be older - a lot of retirees - and people who have worked as educators or in the social sciences, also for the most part black and female.
  49. 2 points
    Numbers are integral part of science and without numbers it wouldn't be possible to conduct experiments. If numbers are created and not discovered then irs possible mathematics is built on fiction. https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/article/great-math-mystery/
  50. 2 points
    Women are not a monolith @Delano. If Megyn Kelly disagreed, not only would not care, I would be happy about it.
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