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17 year old Leonard Cooper wins 75,000 and teen tournament on Jeopardy

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Leonard Cooper & His Fro Wins Jeopardy’s Teen Tournament

 

jeopardy-leonard-cooper-final-response-3
Throughout my teens years I was obsessed with Jeopardy. Every night at 7:30 p.m., family members knew where to find me. I sat in front of the television and competed against the other contestants. My friends and family were amazed with how much useless information (which is what they called it) I knew. As I watched the teen tournament this week, I had my money on Leonard Cooper, a 17-year-old high school senior. Not only did he have a charismatic personality, he had the brains to go along with it.

The Jeopardy Teen Tournament final is a two-day event, the scores are combined from both nights and the person with the highest total wins. Leading up to the final Jeopardy question, Cooper hit the daily double, and he went for broke. Oddly enough, the question was a pretty simple one about Twelve Angry Men, so he was able to wipe his brow after he correctly answered it.

Then there was Final Jeopardy and this happened:

 

 

 

http://www.clutchmagonline.com/2013/02/leonard-cooper-his-fro-wins-jeopardys-teen-tournament/comment-page-6/

 

 

 

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He is obviously good at math too.  The young man sporting the ?love 'fro was mathematically the winner before final jeopardy even started.

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I thought that was Dwayne from "What's Happening" at first.

"Hey heeey hey!"

Or more like Michael Jackson when he was 18.

 


But it's always good to see an intelligent young brother or sister on such a popular program because it helps to offset much of the negativity that the world often sees.
 


 

I also like watching Jeopardy, although I don't watch it as much as I used to.

I used to watch it everyday at an old job and would say the answers (questions) outloud trying to show off.

One day in the lunch room a White guy in Ohio actually told me to my face, "I didn't know colored guys liked watching Jeopardy!"

This was in the 90's!



 

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After winning the teacher's tourrnament, this young brother went on to greater heights!  I watch Jeopardy every day, Pioneer.  Been doing so since it first started. Some days I can answer all the questions, other days none. I do fairly well on the final jeopardy questions. The thing about this game is that all one needs to have a shot at winning is to be well-read and know a little bit about a lot of things.That's why folks like taxi cab drivers and mail carriers often beat out college graduates and professionals. Having the quick reflexes that allow you to be quick on the signal button also helps. Click on the link below.

 

Fenwick teacher wins JEOPARDY! Tournament of Champions ...

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After winning the teacher's tourrnament, this young brother went on to greater heights!  I watch Jeopardy every day, Pioneer.  Been doing so since it first started. Some days I can answer all the questions, other days none. I do fairly well on the final jeopardy questions. The thing about this game is that all one needs to have a shot at winning is to be well-read and know a little bit about a lot of things.That's why folks like taxi cab drivers and mail carriers often beat out college graduates and professionals. Having the quick reflexes that allow you to be quick on the signal button also helps. Click on the link below.

 

Fenwick teacher wins JEOPARDY! Tournament of Champions ...

 

 

It's funny you mentioned the difference between being simply smart and being quick witted.

I was actually having this converation the other day with an old friend from highschool.

We were talking about people who did so well in school and seemed to be very smart but weren't doing the best financially.

Simply being "smart" or holding a lot of information in your head doesn't always equal success.

Even when I was a kid we used to "cap" on eachother (some called it playing the dozens), and I noticed that some of the smartest kids weren't very quick in coming up with jokes, couldn't keep their cool, and were constantly slammed by kids who were otherwise considered dumb or slow academically but were very quick in coming up with material to keep the crowd laughing.

 

It's not enough to be intelligent, you have to know how to properly apply that intelligence in a practical manner.

 

This is why in most successful firms, the HR manager doesn't just look at an applicant's academic records but also thier extracurricular activities and hobbies and look forward to that ultimate sit down interview.

Years ago I went on one job interview where the guy invited me in and started talking to me and in the middle of the conversation he tossed a softball towards me and I caught it. He said he was testing my reflexes, lol.

At the time he did it I didn't see the logic in testing my physical reflexes for a sales job, but weeks later I understood completely.

 

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Doing well financially and intelligence may not have as high a correlation as you think. 

 

On average, do you think a smart Black woman does as well financially as the an white guy, with average intelligence?  Besides some of the brightest people eschew material wealth altogether. 

 

The very definition of intelligence is the ability to apply knowledge in not just practical, but more importantly creative ways.  I know plenty of guys who can analyze defense strategies, memorize team roosters, player positions, discuss this in a historical context and form insightful opinions on game outcomes.  Unfortunately, all of this mental ability is wasted on skills for which there no demand for in the employment market. 

 

We used to call it "snapping" on each other.  Being quick witted, or clever and coming up with a unique and funny perspective plus good delivery probably has a intelligence component, but the smartest people were not the best snappers.  You also had to be willing to publicly degrade someone else, often saying hurtful things -- just for fun.  The willing to do that usually goes down as intelligence goes up.

 

Maybe that guy tossing you the softball unexpectedly was looking for a 1st baseman for the corporate team. :-)

 

What was the logic for testing you physical reflects for a seemingly unrelated job?

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What was the logic for testing you physical reflects for a seemingly unrelated job?

It was a sales job where we would often have to give seminars to and take questions from a very diverse public from pregnant women to college kids to construction workers to grumpy retirees.

You'd have a sales pitch but often times people will catch you off guard by asking questions or challenging you to verify what you say.

You heard of someone throwing the proverbial "curb ball" question haven't you?

He wanted to see how well you could focus on a subject....have your attention diverted and be sharp enough to quickly handle the distraction....then resume your focus on the original subject.

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I read your answer but the relationship between catching a softball off guard and being prepared for a sales gig is still lost on me.. 

 

Physicist Stephen Hawkins, mentally, is about as sharp as they come.  But if tossed a softball his way it might knock him unselfconscious.

 

Leon Spinks had very fast reflexes but no one ever accused him of being a Carver (as in George Washington).

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It all depends on whether the mentality that enables a person to think on his feet stems from the same source that makes a person able to have quick physical reflexes. These 2 skills both exemplify a spontaneity that comes from being right-brained.
 
Because a person is handicapped doesn't mean that he couldn't have quick reflexes if he wasn't physically impaired. Physical disabilities are aberrations that interfere with a person's natural abilities.
 
Similarly, a person may be very intelligent, but also a slow deep thinker who is not quick on the response.
 
The difference between intelligence and instincts is why we have educated people with book smarts and shrewd people with street smarts. The individual who has both is a force to be reckoned with.

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That is an interesting analysis Cynique.  I suspect one is purely a physical attribute the other is mental.

 

For the sake of Pioneers points we can probably lump instinct and intelligence in the same category and separate from physical reflexes.

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Perhaps the term "multi-tasking" would give you a better idea of the importance of being able to integrate physical and mental reflexes.

Picture a mother who is able to keep and eye on and entertain her child WHILE cooking dinner and making sure the laundry is washed, dried, and folded all at the same time.

Or just picture a father talking to his friend in the living room about sports or sex but when his little daughter comes in with a picture he painted he's able to congradulate her, send her on her way, and resume the conversation.

The mental and physical reflexes are constantly working in concert sometimes together and sometimes separately but in the proper sequence.

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So the ability to multitask is predictor of success in a sales job.  Being able to catch a ball, off guard, is an indicator of one's ability to multitask.  Therefore the person with the ability to catch the ball would be a good salesperson.  Is that your conclusion?

 

Sure the brain controls all mental and physical reflexes -- everything we do, much of it unconsciously.

 

How good were you at the sales job Pioneer?

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So the ability to multitask is predictor of success in a sales job. Being able to catch a ball, off guard, is an indicator of one's ability to multitask. Therefore the person with the ability to catch the ball would be a good salesperson. Is that your conclusion?

That.....or perhaps something similar, lol.

It's all about being able to switch your focus back and forth on a dime.

It's like acting.

Some people can do it, some people can't.

I don't think it's about intelligence or education but how your brain is wired.

 

How good were you at the sales job Pioneer?

I did OK.

I was promoted to managing my own store which was (and still is) one of the worst in the region.

I wasn't able to turn it around and 3 months after the promotion (having moved to the city) I was fired and replaced by another guy who was also fired and replaced.

Multiply that story by 4 different people....lol.

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