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What is everyone reading?

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Hello All,

I figured I'd be the first one to post the first, What are you reading thread, on the new board. *smile*

Well, I'll go first. I'm reading Victoire by Maryse Conde, which is a sort of memoir, biography, historical fiction novel. You all know how much I love Maryse Conde. I find her brilliant. She's one of my all time favorite writers of all times. So far, the small novel is turning out to be magnificent. I'll keep you posted.

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Just started Black Is The New White, Paul Mooney's memoir. Might not be able to read it on the bus too much 'cause folks were looking at me kinda funny when I started laughing out loud . . .

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This is always a popular question. Sometimes the books which I list "that I'm reading" I actually never complete. I plan to start Dolen Perkin-Valdez's Wench I'm looking forward to this one given the positive reviews.

I'm currently reading, on my Kindle, Malcom Gladwell's What the Dog Saw: And Other Adventures this collection of articles is not very interesting, or at least not as interesting as his books. I'll probably read a few more then bail if nothing else strikes my fancy.

My Mom has read the last 4 of Vanessa Davis Griggs novels -- she loves them. She could not find the Griggs' first 3 novels in books stores (no PC at home, to purchase via AALBC.com). I had Grigg's first novel The Rose of Jericho in my library. I gave it to her. I think she read it in 5 minutes. I asked for it back she told me, "No!" -- Ma just took my book. The other two I found on Amazon through a third party.

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Guest Wallace Grommitt

Just started reading "The Ancestors". It is 3 short stories by L.A. Banks, Tananarive Due, & Brandon Massey. i am a big fan of Brandon Massey & L.A. Banks so I figure I will start reading this book today.

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Love, Anger, Madness - A Haitian Trilogy, By Marie Vieux-Chauvet. This is a new translation with an introduction by Edwidge Danticat. Danticat mentioned it at the Brooklyn Book Fest in Sept. '09. Purchased Victoire today. Awaiting the delivery of Fela- this bitch of life.

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Guest Guest Pat

I am presently reading The Blue Orchard by Jackson Taylor and getting ready to read Beneath the Lion's Gaze. Just finished reading Blues For An Alabama Sky, an early play by Pearl Cleage.

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Just finished Percival Everett's "I Am Not Sidney Poitier." I highly recommend it. Now I need a new book to read. Actually, Tina, I am leaning toward Edwidge Danticat's "The Dew Breaker."

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Guest Cheryle

I'm reading a book called "Take Off Your Sunglasses" by CJ Wallace about the effects of domestic violence on a young kid coming into young adulthood.

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Guest tina

Just finished Percival Everett's "I Am Not Sidney Poitier." I highly recommend it. Now I need a new book to read. Actually, Tina, I am leaning toward Edwidge Danticat's "The Dew Breaker."

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Guest Latasha

B~more Readers with W.I.S.D.O.M. Book Club is reading Everything I'm Not Made Me Everything I Am: Discovering Your Personal Best by Jeff Johnson.

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Guest DahomeyAhosi

I'm reading When China rules the world by Jacques Martin. First book in a while that I've read that freely admits that westerners feel that modernity = westernization and the implications of such a silly belief.

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Guest reuben

Right now I have finished reading THE MEETING POINT by Austin Clarke.It's about a West Indian domestic living in Canada, and what unfolds when her sister comes down for a visit. I found the story kind of slow and not as eventful as I was hoping for. I am now embarking on THE WRITING CIRCLE by Rozena Maart. The story sounds more engaging and exciting, so I can't wait to dig in.

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Guest Soul Sister

I enjoyed Cion - and Zakes Mda his writing is fabulous. What did you think about the arrival of the brother in Ohio - the night and his response - as well as the story of enslavement?? You should check out his Madonna of Excelsior -- another great read - I love authors who promote some consciousness, information and great writing - that is the recipe for success. I will check out Ways of Dying

I am reading Jesus, Jobs and Justice as well as the Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. Both works about Black women - the first talks about the organizations and influence African American Christian women have exercised from the earliest times - and the other is about an African American woman who suffered and died 1950s from cervival cancer - a biopsy of her tissue was taken and grown outside of her body - this medical innovation spawned a medical revolution which has given cures and insight into the human body - both are must reads

peace

Soul Sister --

ps - Carey you know I have nothing but love for you - but the rant that started this thread and the back and forth - WOW -- some big, fat person musta stepped on that corn/bunion -- on the left little toe -- Epsom salts my brother - smile - and that goes for you too Cyn. epsom salt

I just completed Cion by Zakes Mda and have started Ways of Dying by the same author.

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Hello All,

I just finished Love, Anger, Madness by Marie Vieux-Clauvet, an excellent, wonderful book! Right now, I'm approaching the middle of One Drop by Bliss Broyard. This one is turning out to be a page turner! It's a true story of how Bliss's father, Anatole Broyard, hid the fact that he had been passing as a white man for the majority of his life. His Children did not know about it until shortly before he died. Bliss is on a mission to find out about the black side of her family. This is an old book, it came out in 2007. The only reason I know about it is that I went to a huge Barnes and Noble and was looking through the clearance section--the only section I buy books in. *big smile* And One Drop was in the clearance pile. So far, it's turning out to be a good read!

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Actually... my DC Soul-Sister with the misplaced blister, this is my very first time clicking on ths thread. See, Although Thump is a little older than I (close but older) please don't get us confused. Thumper started this thread. I just stopped in to see how normal people act. I mean, the book suggestion were great but I almost feel asleep midway through the dang thang.

But Yeah, I have to admit that Cynique brings out the worst in me. But I am glad that you also put her in check. But please don't mention her name. This has been a nice civil thread. I might come through here more often. If nothing else, I can pick up a few names of some serious sounding authors and then drop them at a party of important negroes. I might even sell a few beer cans and buy one of the books. Then I'll stick it under my arm when I go to my next NAACP meeting. That's sure to get me a few votes for King POOPAH.

I'm going to stay away from anything LiLi is reading because... well.

Anyway, I'm looking at the one book about the West Indian Domestic in Canada. Now, is it me, or. Well, I think I'll pass on that one, and instead read about Blanche. (Yeah, only Thump knows a bout Blanche)

Now, Thump may be cheap, but he knows a little something about good books. So if he says the old one drop white man is a good read, I'd be inclined to believe him. But Troy, I don't know about him. However, mamma knows best, so his posts are a push.

Okay my Soul Sister, since you put me in check, I'll try to maintain a sense of sensibility. Dang, I thought my mother lived in Illinios *lol*

But remember,I didn't start this, Thump did. Blame it on the Naptown Nappy Yappy.

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Actually... my DC Soul-Sister with the misplaced blister, this is my very first time clicking on ths thread. See, Although Thump is a little older than I (close but older) please don't get us confused. Thumper started this thread. I just stopped in to see how normal people act. I mean, the book suggestion were great but I almost feel asleep midway through the dang thang.

But Yeah, I have to admit that Cynique brings out the worst in me. But I am glad that you also put her in check. But please don't mention her name. This has been a nice civil thread. I might come through here more often. If nothing else, I can pick up a few names of some serious sounding authors and then drop them at a party of important negroes. I might even sell a few beer cans and buy one of the books. Then I'll stick it under my arm when I go to my next NAACP meeting. That's sure to get me a few votes for King POOPAH.

I'm going to stay away from anything LiLi is reading because... well.

Anyway, I'm looking at the one book about the West Indian Domestic in Canada. Now, is it me, or. Well, I think I'll pass on that one, and instead read about Blanche. (Yeah, only Thump knows a bout Blanche)

Now, Thump may be cheap, but he knows a little something about good books. So if he says the old one drop white man is a good read, I'd be inclined to believe him. But Troy, I don't know about him. However, mamma knows best, so his posts are a push.

Okay my Soul Sister, since you put me in check, I'll try to maintain a sense of sensibility. Dang, I thought my mother lived in Illinios *lol*

But remember,I didn't start this, Thump did. Blame it on the Naptown Nappy Yappy.

Puleeze. I haven't been put "in check". And I have no intention of deferring to the requests of those who want everybody to assume a placid demeanor. There are enough mild-mannered people around here, most of whom to seem to be laying back in the cut, saying nothing. I suggest that since they've decided to become members that they speak up and add some balance to the board. As for Carey, any time the ol coot wants to play "hard ball", I'm ready.

BTW, "The Immortal Life of Henriette Lacks" is next on my reading lists. I remember hearing about her case a long time ago and am glad somebody finally decided to chronicle her story.

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Feb 2010 Books Read

Burning Desire Relentless Aaron

In The Beginning F.D. Davis

Love Me Now Celeste O. Norfleet

Betrayal Dwayne S Joseph

An About Face M.W. Moore

Crushed Ice Eric Pete

Hope to get to or will carry over to March:

The Blue Orchard Jackson Taylor

A Deep Dark Secret Kimberla Lawson Roby

Deep Deception Tina Brooks McKinney

Beneath The Lion’s Gate Maza Mengiste

Three Days Before The Shooting Ralph Ellison edited by

John F Callahan & Adam Bradley

Zora Hurston and the Strange Case of Ruby McCollum C. Authur Ellis, PHD

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Actually... my DC Soul-Sister with the misplaced blister, this is my very first time clicking on ths thread. See, Although Thump is a little older than I (close but older) please don't get us confused. Thumper started this thread. I just stopped in to see how normal people act. I mean, the book suggestion were great but I almost feel asleep midway through the dang thang.

But Yeah, I have to admit that Cynique brings out the worst in me. But I am glad that you also put her in check. But please don't mention her name. This has been a nice civil thread. I might come through here more often. If nothing else, I can pick up a few names of some serious sounding authors and then drop them at a party of important negroes. I might even sell a few beer cans and buy one of the books. Then I'll stick it under my arm when I go to my next NAACP meeting. That's sure to get me a few votes for King POOPAH.

I'm going to stay away from anything LiLi is reading because... well.

Anyway, I'm looking at the one book about the West Indian Domestic in Canada. Now, is it me, or. Well, I think I'll pass on that one, and instead read about Blanche. (Yeah, only Thump knows a bout Blanche)

Now, Thump may be cheap, but he knows a little something about good books. So if he says the old one drop white man is a good read, I'd be inclined to believe him. But Troy, I don't know about him. However, mamma knows best, so his posts are a push.

Okay my Soul Sister, since you put me in check, I'll try to maintain a sense of sensibility. Dang, I thought my mother lived in Illinios *lol*

But remember,I didn't start this, Thump did. Blame it on the Naptown Nappy Yappy.

SHAT UP

LiLi

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SHAT UP

LiLi

I second that motion, LiLi. Carey doesn't need the epsom salts that Soul Sister recommended because he already has diarrhea of the mouth. Yada Yada Yada. Woo-woo-woo. Blah, blah, blah.

He is right, however, when he says I bring out the worst in him because none of the arrows he aims at me ever pierce my skin, but he just can't do any better. :lol:

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Hello All,

I just finished One Drop by Bliss Broyard. One Drop is a damn good book. I was able to look at reace from another perspective, some what, and learned about the Louisana Creole people. I recommend it.

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That looks like a good one Xeon.

I felt in need of a little retail thereapy so I just ordered [through this site of course :)] : The Ancestors - Brandon Massey, Tananarive Due, L.A Banks; The Blue Orchard - Jackson Taylor and I Do Not Come To You By Chance - Adaobi Nwaubani.

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katzman-david.jpg

Before the Ghetto: Black Detroit in the Nineteenth Century, by David Katzman.

Antebellum Detroit had a feisty black community that fought the slave-catchers -- literally. When Ruth and Thornton Blackburn were arrested in 1833, female friends spirited her out of the jail by switching clothes with her during a visit. The next day, hundreds of black men laid armed seige to the jail and freed Thornton by force when the sheriff tried to put him in a cart to send him back to slavery. The sheriff received a brutal beating and eventually died of his injuries, while the Blackburns got away across the river to Canada.

The guy above is the author. I didn't find a picture of his bookcover, but thought his beret was pretty jaunty.

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Guest bookster

BTW, "The Immortal Life of Henriette Lacks" is next on my reading lists. I remember hearing about her case a long time ago and am glad somebody finally decided to chronicle her story.

I heard NPR do a feature on this book last month. The author heard about Henrietta Lacks at age 16 from her biology teacher, and was smart enough to recognize (and remember) a great untold story.

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That looks like a good one Xeon.

It is. It's part of a trilogy of books Richard Evans wrote about the rise and fall of the Nazis. Fascinating reading. William Shirer is also one of my favorite writers who has written a number of books about Third Reich. His most famous is the “Rise and Fall of the Third Reich”. A monumental book that is riveting to read.

rise-and-fall-of-the-third-reich-a-history-of-nazi-germany.jpg

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katzman-david.jpg

Before the Ghetto: Black Detroit in the Nineteenth Century, by David Katzman.

Antebellum Detroit had a feisty black community that fought the slave-catchers -- literally. When Ruth and Thornton Blackburn were arrested in 1833, female friends spirited her out of the jail by switching clothes with her during a visit. The next day, hundreds of black men laid armed seige to the jail and freed Thornton by force when the sheriff tried to put him in a cart to send him back to slavery. The sheriff received a brutal beating and eventually died of his injuries, while the Blackburns got away across the river to Canada.

The guy above is the author. I didn't find a picture of his bookcover, but thought his beret was pretty jaunty.

I must find this book !!!

LiLi

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I just recently finished "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks" by Rebecca Skoots, a current best-seller that exposes the medical violations poor southern blacks were subjected to during the Jim Crow era, specifically in the 1940s.

This was an interesting, albeit disturbing book detailing the tragic fate of a black woman who, as a product of her times and her circumstances, died a cruel death at the age of 31, the victim of cervical cancer. Trapped in a crude lifestyle that made her vulnerable to the disease that eventually killed her, what distinguished Henrietta Lacks from other such victims was the uniqueness which laboratory experiments discovered about her cells: they survived and thrived outside of the body.

The author chronicles her investigation of this case which revolutionized the scientific world by explaining the technical details of medical procedures while telling the personal history of Henrietta who was revealed to be a strong, capable, vivacious wife and mother of 5 children who were also exploited by a system of injustice. Unfortunately, this well-written book that finally gives the obscure Henrietta Lacks the recognition she deserves is the only compensation her family has thus far fallen heir to; a sad but enlightening tale.

Three stars is my rating.

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I just finished Michele Grant's Heard It All Before:

heard+it+all+before.jpg

It was a good read, the first in her 3-book deal, and I'm looking forward to the others.

I put down The Talented Miss Highsmith, to read Michele's book, so now I'm picking it up again.

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I just finished The Financial Lives of the Poets by Jess Walter. NPR listed it as one of the top 10 books (something like that) for 2009. I'd image most middle aged guys will be able to relate to this sometimes outrageous tale. A very humorous take on career, money, marriage, children, the financial meltdown. I highly recommend it.

511InGtz1EL.jpg

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Three stars is my rating.

Cynique is that 3 out of 4 or 5 stars? Everyone I know who has read this book raved about it.

Kam reviewed it favorably: http://www.aalbc.com/reviews/immortal_life_of_henrietta_lacks.html

I have this book on my reading list, but I just can;t seem to bring myself to read it. Where it not for the rave reviews I probably would not consider picking it up at all. I just can;t image how this story can be as compeling as everyone says it is. I'mm get around to it eventually...

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Three stars out of a possible four is my rating, Troy.

Actually although I found this book interesting, it I really didn't find it compelling. It was not fast-paced, and veered off into a lot of technical chronology, in addition to focusing more on the heirs of Henrietta Lacks than on her.

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I’m reading The Beautiful Things That Heaven Bears by Dinaw Mengestu – about an Ethiopian immigrant trying to make it in D.C. I like the writing but I don't seem to be able to reconcile the inner voice with the spoken words and actions. They don’t seem to belong to the same person but I’m not quite half way through so hopefully it’ll come together for me.

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Hello All,

This morning I finished a WONDERFUL novel called Jesus Boy by Preston L. Allen. The novel is remarkable. It's about a young boy Elwyn, who was raised to be one of the Faithful, a member of the Church of The Blessed Redemeer who Walked Upon the Water. The church's name is a killa ain't it? Elwyn's a piano prodigy, who will start preaching to the unsaved in the streets, in the middle of the school building, wherever. When he turns 16 years old, he begin having an illicit affair with a 42 year old widow. The novel is deep and humurous, funny in some parts because there's truth in it. It's definitely not the standard "I was a ho but now I found Jesus" books.

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Guest Nubianpoet

I am reading a selection of poetry by different poets by, Belinda Rochelle titled, "Words With Wings." Beautiful artwork, within. B)

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