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Documentary on the Deliberate Destruction of Black America by the FBI

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Gil Noble's Documentary on the intentional destruction of Black America by the FBI

 

Billions of dollars were invested in illegal activity to destroy all efforts for Black Americans to improve our lot in American life.  The activity continues...

 

 

"Documentary by Gil Noble on the intentional destruction of Black America by the FBI using infiltration, counter-intelligence programs and drugs. From Marcus Garvey to Paul Robeson to Martin Luther King to Malcolm X to Fred Hampton, to the Black Panthers to heroin and crack, the FBI has worked to destroy black people. Includes interview with Darthard Perry, Ex-informer for the FBI."

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I lived through the Witch hunting era of J.Edgar Hoover who was the Devil Incarnate, a vicious abuser of his power. My recollections if this period have to do with the mentality and attitude of the general black population of which I and my contemporaries were typical of. 

 

The Communist Party never really made great inroads into the ranks of the black masses.  Like everybody else, black folks were brainwashed by "Red Scare" propaganda into thinking that godless Communism was evil and not the answer to racism.  Moreover, the Communist cause was not helped by the unwillingness of its paternalistic leaders to share their authority with black converts.  But Hoover was obsessed with the threat of Communism.

 

Similarly, the Black Panthers never captured the support of mainstream Blacks because they were too militant; black people loved the romanticized sinister image and revolutionary rhetoric of the Panthers but weren't convinced the United States government could be overthrown. The greatest accomplishment of the Panthers was that they scared the hell out of Hoover who overestimated their influence and regarded them as a real threat.

 

Black people really loved Malcom X for standing up to white America and tellin' it like it was but they did not flock to the Black Muslim movment in great numbers.  The  austere Islamic lifestyle with its restrictions required too many sacrifices. "Negroes" also could not bring themselves to believe that all whites were "blue-eyed devils".  But once again, the fanatical Hoover harbored great fear of this group and its leaders who he was determined to destroy.. 

 

Martin Luther King was the true messiah of  most Blacks.  They believed in him and were inspired to follow him and his nonviolence strategies.  This really unnerved Hoover and, pervert that he was, he became a voyeur of King's sex escapades, which were fodder for black mail. 

 

To me, the most amazing thing about those times, was the loyalty and patriotism exhibited by the black majority.  They never gave up on democracy and the idea that America was their country, too, and that with help from white people of good will,  they would overcome. The reward for their faithfulness was the insidious campaign on the part of an arm of the government determined to bring about the devastation of America's black community. Today, black hope is comparable to the "raisin in the sun" metaphor of poet Langston Hughes.

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WHAT ABOUT  THE  BLACK   PEOPLE   IN  THE  BLACK  DESTRUCTION/BLACK   MEN  JOYFULLY   SET UP  CRACK  HOUSES,PIMP  HOUSES,   PIMPING  OUT   TEENAGE GIRLS.NO  FEAR  OF  AIDS,HIV VIRUS..GANGS      GENOCIDING THEIR  OWN PEOPLE//THE  CHURCH   ,A   SLAVE  CABIN  ON  PLANTATIONS.ENSLAVING  THE  SOULS  OF  BLACK  FOLKS  FOR   PROFIT///

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Harry over time I've come to see this attitude as blaming the victim.  Sure all those Blacks do to each other are reprehensible.

 

Did you hear the part about how drugs were brought into the Black community?

 

You can't treat people with utter contempt, for centuries, and not expect some dysfunction.  If we don't appreciate the true cause of our problems things will never change--because we continue to treat the symptoms rather than dealing with the problem.

 

In places like NYC the problems are obvious--it is too damn expensive for many Black people to live here.  People are suffering, stressed out, and without hope for making things better.  We need better schools, better housing, better food, and employment opportunities, before we can hope for any of this to change.

 

NYC City used to build affordable housing for large numbers of people.  Today most of the new housing stock goes to rich folks, many of whom don't even live in the City.

 

 

 

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At what point do we realize the root and fix it? Why is it we were able to pull together in the worst eras and grow. How long do we blame the system? At what point do we fix us? Blaming systemic issues does nothing but promote the victim and I'm owed mentality. Just because a gun or drugs are brought to the community we don't have to use it. If I know I'm screwing up my job is to figure it out. Blaming perpetuates the system just as much as the system does and has. How did we fight through the worst things ever only to let the system prevent any further progress?

 

Why did this guy keep pushing: http://www.inquisitr.com/1811267/james-robertsons-gofundme-money-may-not-be-used-for-car-at-all-amazing-turn-of-events-no-more-shoes-made-for-walking/

 

How did you create college students, a Black owned business if the system is so dastardly? How many problems are created by bad decisions vs the system?

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I guess the main difference between what I see as the "root problem" and what Chris and Harry see as the root problem is this;

 

I see the root problem as racism, the primary tool of those in control.

 

You all see the problem as Black people not doing what is necessary to make it.

 

What you two fail to realize is that our dysfunctional behavior is a direct result of racism. Do you think Black people choose not be be educated, live in the worst conditions and fill up the prisons?

 

Sure Chris, I sent two kids to college; in fact, I paid for their education from nursery school.  My wife and I paid dearly for this, sacrificing a great deal.  Sure I have a business, but I no longer earn enough make it in the big city without having to teach on the side.  I'm sacrificing a great deal for something I believe is important to our community.  

 

If we did not live in a racist society I would not be running AALBC.com.  I would be doing something far more lucrative.  If we lived in a society that cared about educating Black children, I would not have had to pay, through the nose, to have my kids educated.

 

Obviously I (we) could all go on, and on, about how hard living in a racist society is for Black people.  The idea that all we have to do is, is do the right thing is fatally flawed.  Of course we have to do the right thing, but ignoring the hostile environment we live in, expecting our good behavior to make a difference is naive.

 

Besides we can observe the results of this belief.  We all know smart Black people who failed, or are even in jail.  We all know mediocre white folks achieving great things, like becoming President of the US, Governor of Alaska, etc.

 

It does no matter very much what we do, until we do something about the folks in control.  Otherwise we will not see anything beyond token benefits for a few (celebrities, athletes, or those working directly for those in control), while the majority of us are largely shut out, blaming ourselves and each other.

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I had a really good post written but my browser closed and I'm not writing that long post again, lol. Troy I know all of the things you've written above. The difference is you're looking at it with New York eyes. I'm looking at it with Memphis eyes and that is a huge difference. Where you see racism as a factor I don't. Memphis is almost 70% Black, Memphis' school system is run by Blacks. The city government is run by Blacks, the major companies in Memphis have Blacks in a high position. Memphis has more jobs available than people willing to work. Memphis has a great prison to employment program. Everything that you are saying hinders Black folks isn't here.

 

So that leaves one option as to why Memphis is always on the First 48 and leads the country in murders and unemployment: Choice.

 

You're saying people don't choose to be in the situation they are in. I'm saying that's bull because in Memphis the jobs are here. Anyone who tells you anything otherwise is full of shit. You can rent a house in Memphis for 600.00 a month. In the worst parts of town the rent is as low as 300-400. This means two people working at McDonald's can earn 7 bucks per hour and work 4 hours a day for 5 days per week and those two people can bring in a 1200 a month together. After taxes that's about 900. Is it enough to live? when your income is only 30% of your housing yes. That's Memphis. We have more warehouses and distribution here than anywhere else. As a matter of fact, the city has to bring people in to fill jobs because people here just don't want to work. Now are there factors in play that prevent some from getting to jobs? Maybe but once again everything you see as an obstruction is a choice. 

 

Education in Memphis is damn near free. Community College is paid for with Hope Scholarships. This is the real land of opportunity but racism is stopping people in a Black city controlled by Black folks?

 

In the seventies we could sleep with our doors open in the 100 degree weather. Now we have one of the highest murder rates in the country. So you're saying when White people controlled the city we were better behaved and more educated? Now that we have had Black mayors and Black police chiefs we are out of control? Don't tell me about crack in the 80s and racism because at that time we still had a ton of Black controlled services in place (churches and temporary employment services, etc) but in the last 30 years we just regressed? 

 

in Memphis all you have to do is the right thing. That's a fact. There are people here who work for Fed Ex part time and Nike part time and for temp services part time and when you sit and break down the numbers in Memphis part time with two people is money that you can actually live on because unlike McDonalds these jobs pay 12-15 per hour with only a high school diploma. More important most of the warehouses here have tuition reimbursement. 

 

After living in Los Angeles, San Diego, and Memphis I can say without a doubt that big cities are definitely hindered by racism and social constructs: LA and SD. However, Memphis is an open book and there really aren't any excuses for failure here. There are just poor decisions.

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Chris I hear you Chris but the problems I'm talking about are national, and are true in virtually any place where there are large concentrations of Black folks. So New York and Memphis are in the same boat--for the same reasons.

 

I used to visit Raleigh, NC as a kid.  No one locked anything.  Kids could leave their bikes on the lawn, get up the next morning, and their bikes would still be there!  Coming from New York City I could not believe it, but I loved the stress free living.  Today the same houses have multiple locks and still get broken into.  It is so very sad... 

 

OK so Memphis is the land of opportunity.  Indeed you make me wanna move there.  Memphis is a much easier place to get by, but yet, problems persist. Crime was nonexistent 40 years ago.  You tell me then, what changed and why?

 

Did the people should become criminals and stop going to school for no reason in the last 40 years? Chris you assert that people just need do what they need to do.  So why are they not doing it Chris? 

 

-------

 

Across the street from the Stax Museum, in Memphis is (or was) a supermarket.  The first thing you see is a huge lottery booth, The mean section had chicken feet and a few other low grade cuts of meat, scrabble, Bologna and the like--nothing was appealing.  There was a rows of jugs of plastic juice of every color imaginable; red, blue, purple, green.  I just went in there to grab a quick snack. But I was so surprised by what I saw, I went back out and told the wife and kids, you gotta check this super market out.  It was like a ghetto bodega on steroids.  I'd never seen anything like it. It was run by what appeared to be Chinese people all the customers were Black.

 

---------

 

Man I hate when I lose a long post!  The same thing can happen in virtually any ap.  When I find that I writing something long and I don't want to risk losing it, or I've started writing something and I have to come back to it. I save it in a separate file like my email program.  Sometimes I'll just go head and save the comment I have not complete finished. Unfortunately you can save a draft of a comment.  The same used to happen to me on Facebook, but I no longer write anything long enough to care about loosing when my browser crashes

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That's my question though. How and why did it change? What happened here? Why is it that a city that was run by Whites at a much worse time have less Black violence and crime and a city that is now run by Blacks has more crime and unemployment with more opportunities? 

 

That's why I have the biggest problem agreeing to a lot of the ideas of social constructs creating the problem. Memphis is everything Black people want and yet it isn't fulfilling it's potential. Yet three hours away Nashville has a Black owned bookstore, three black colleges of substantial standing in Meharry Medical, Fisk and TSU and an upwordly mobile trajection. However the Black population is much smaller there...

 

In regard to Stax, Justin Timberlake invested a ton of money and now the area has a brand new business district across the street. It is still in a food desert so the shopping isn't that great, but the black college right behind has broken ground on new dorms and there is a Farmer's Market that just got 1.2 Million in funding so a lot of the things are changing. While the bus system isn't much to scream about, you have people in this neighborhood the home of Royal Studios that just created the super hit Uptown Funk, and those people are still walking around unwilling to walk down the street and apply for jobs at the local stores and fast food joints. 

 

If I have to answer the question why are people not doing it? I have to say that they simply don't want to, at least here in Memphis that is the case. I will say this, the kids here are learning from their parents and the welfare state is in full effect. Memphis has the highest death of babies in the world! What is happening here is completely absurd. People have to start taking responsibility because honestly Memphis is the land of milk and honey. Coming from California I can see things differently, but where else could I have quit a tenure track job and start selling shoes and make more money? I mean the opportunities because of the cost of property are astounding. If you came here and opened a bookstore and did events with our location to places here in the south AALBC would be one of the biggest companies in the country.

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Two very valid points of view, Troy and Chris, which substantiate my contention that the black experience varies from person to person.
 
I fully concur that bad decisions are a great hindrance to black progress. So many of the setbacks in the ghetto stem from young girls choosing to burdening themselves with the baggage of children fathered by multiple baby daddies who are not present in the home, all of which sets the stage for their offspring to grow up to be trifling lay-abouts like their parents. Bottom line is you give yourself a better chance in life, once you decide to not saddle yourselves with a bunch of kids you can't take care of, or felony charges that result from committing crimes. People do make it out of the 'hood. Today's black middleclass was yesterday's inner city dweller. Yes, racism can be a factor in the commission of crimes, but it would be a stretch to say it is the cause of a young people from the underclasses embracing the idea that "making a baby" is a rite of passage.
 
Another way of making things easier on yourself is to forget the pie in the sky myopia and view with new eyes the American dream of having a job that will make it possible to own a home with a 2-car garage, a manicured lawn, a patio and backyard pool located in a suburb where schools are great and the soccer team boosters are "stay-at-home moms" who chauffeur their children around to their dance and Karate classes. The notion that all these symbols of success guarantee happiness is a myth. These enclaves are made up of zanex poppin' helicopter parents hovering over the children who are steeped in a sense of entitlement and sapped by their dysfunctions of anxorexia, drugs, suicide and impulses to shoot up the classrooms that are the source of social media bullying. Along with all that, are the problems that rose when these towns sprung up and displaced coyotes, cougars, deer, skunks and other critters who are now returning to claim their turf and make nuisances and menaces of themselves. In addition, these dwellings filled in all the open spaces where tornadoes once touched down without doing harm. Not anymore.Twisters now ravage whole towns. These housing developments also occupy the run-off plains that used to prevent the flooding that now reeks havoc any time there's heavy rain fall. All of these nuclear families thinking they'd escape the dangers of the big cities, ended up inheriting a whole new set of problems. This is the Chicagoland scenario
 
Racism continues to exist because to eliminate it would call for America to fall back and re-group, something it is not going to do. It's easy to identify and blame racism for black woes but that doesn't dispel it. It just frustrates those who recognize how ubiquitous it is. Unfortunately Blacks have few viable options but to try to co-exist with racism, especially since they, themselves, are full of prejudices. Pragmatism, however, is one way to counter racism. In the 21st century, lifestyles and what contitutes a family have morphed into a new paradigm. So should the American Dream since it aint' all it's cracked up to be.
 
There's something to be said for the "git in where you fit in" route. In this capitalistic pseudo democracy, money is the closest thing to being the great equalizer. Acquire enough of it to be in charge of your own little personal world. Fulfill your racial obligations by making yourself an inspiration to others who aspire to control their private universe.
 
Or - cling to your idealism. And cope with your disillusionment.
 
 
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Well that is good to hear about the Stax neighborhood.  If I could, I would come to Memphis, 'cuase I really can't afford the Big Apple and run AALBC.com at the same time.

 

Cynique it seems it is becoming increasingly difficult to "make it" here in America and fulfill ones racial obligations.  The two activities run counter to each other.  Perhaps this is the crux of the problem.

 

One of the differences I've noticed, Cynique between my generation and yours (based upon my admittedly limited perspective from reading old magazines).  Is that your generation did not solely focus on celebrities and athletes as role models.  I could find articles on writers, physicians, successful people of all types.  When your generation talked about celebrities it was often because they were going something great for our people.

 

Today virtually all the people we talk about are celebrities and athletes and when we talk about them it is usually because they are doing something scandalous; something dumb Cosby did, something stupid Kanye said, or even goofing on the tragic situation of Bobby Brown's daughter.  We rarely talk about successful business owners.  Indeed, few of us can probably name one (who is not an athlete or celebrity.  Other than Obama, there really are not very many role models that are in the media, who are not athletes or celebrities.

 

We also don't live with each other, did we way did 50 years ago.  Middle Class Black people (those who can lose their jobs and make it at least 6 months without their lifestyles changing) tend to live in white enclaves.  The less wealthy (most of us) live in poorer communities with bad schools, and no real life examples of Black professionals or business owners in our communities. The idea of a middle class life style is completely alien to us.

 

I could go on, but the days in when we could leave our doors unlocked were days in which those communities were truly communities.  Most of us, I suspect, don't even know who our neighbors are today.  Instead we opt to experience the world, behind double-locked doors, through the artificially constructed world of social media.

 

We are much more transient, not invested in our communities.  We don't know the owners of the local business, and prefer to travel to a distant malls, or transact online.  Meanwhile while local businesses on main street dry up, along with the money that would have circulated in the community. 

 

The American dream is just that a dream.  The reality, for the majority of us, is a nightmare.  But as long as we have sports, entertainment, and social media to keep us placated and distracted this nightmare called the American Dream is tolerable.

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Troy you would absolutely crush it here. Consider the cost of living and your ability to organize, your reach would be a lot stronger as you would only be 8 hours from the Black hotbeds of America (Chicago, Atlanta, Birmingham, Jackson, Ms., New Orleans) 

 

I think the America Dream as we know it is dead, but in the right situation it is still attainable. It will take a unified approach though. People will have to work together, but I guess that's just not a realistic thing to pursue. We can only try to fix our worlds and hope that our reach is farther than we know. 

 

You are exactly right though about entertainment. Rome had it's gladiators, we have our gladiators. Greece had its plays, we have our television and film. Escapism is a good thing, but ultimately it is dangerous when that escape is not offset by serious thought. Social media hampers and fast responses without research have killed any serious thought almost. 

 

I am in the process of teaching an entrepreneurship class at a local high school in an area where the crime rate is 200% higher than any other area in the city. The admin is giving me a 4 week-2 hour window each week to talk business with the kids. The first meeting was an introduction and this week I hope to give them some insight into starting a business without any money or resources. I think all schools need to implement workshops on entrepreneurship and coding with outside small biz people. This will begin to change a lot of the issues in our neighborhoods. These kids need to be more aware of the things that need to be fixed. Right now, they only know that they should go to school and pray for success which isn't going to work for a society that shifts so fast that while they are listening to the next new rap song and buying the next Jordan the world has moved another mile ahead of them technically. It's a dangerous time.

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On 2/4/2015 at 9:22 AM, CDBurns said:

 

How did you create college students, a Black owned business if the system is so dastardly? How many problems are created by bad decisions vs the system?

Yes, How did we have all those firsts among black people soon after and towards the abolishing of African slavery... how about the turn of the century 1900 I once did a black/women history tribute (february -march) and I was blown away be the large number of women who were:

Union spies,

awarded professional degrees,

entrepreneurs,

big band music managers,

film producers, Writers, Journalists, Publishers et al..

I was astounded and kind of ashamed I wasn't doing more with the "freedom" I have today... So yes, I agree with Troy don't blame the victim not everyone is a leader, but I agree with you too! Those who are leaders need to do a lot more to make up the difference...

Edited by Mel Hopkins
typo
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"One of the differences I've noticed, Cynique between my generation and yours (based upon my admittedly limited perspective from reading old magazines).  Is that your generation did not solely focus on celebrities and athletes as role models.  I could find articles on writers, physicians, successful people of all types.  When your generation talked about celebrities it was often because they were going something great for our people."

This is very true. The role models for inspiration and emulation were not rappers, dysfunctional celebrities, athletes and entertainers for previous generations. This cultural paradigm shift is a generational phenomenon. And it’s very sad. With the advent of social media, the internet, a seemingly insatiable appetite for doofy and trashy reality shows and the exultation of athletes, thugs, rappers and what was once considered unacceptable behavior, you now have a generation existing on a diet of coonery and buffoonery. Sad…sad…sad….

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