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Delano

Cultural Wars and the Black Panther

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Fantasy and mythology are the culture. Or rather they are the base of culture. National identity is based on mythology.

 

Thanks the list. Do you know the name of Hannibal's Dad.

 

 

Countries resemble their Gods.

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Choices people make are almost always based on what they want to know and what they want. Both are satisfied by trying to join, or submitting to the will of those in charge. What we already know determines the approach. Europeans are the gatekeepers of American culture, regardless of one’s national origin. Even Asians and Latinos mimic white culture (Right Troy) on the economic front and will blame democracy that forbid indulgence.

 

I recently had the pleasure of watching Black Panther but couldn’t finish because it seemed so void of a critical or speculative depiction of crucial issues facing Black folk. No stomach for entertainment these days, I guess! On the one hand.

 

On the other hand Black Panther may fit in well for a sociology textbook just as hydrographics drawn on cave walls in Egypt. Which incidentally, serves no purpose other than to entertain human curiosity and provide some historical data of how ancient folk kept financial records or tales about food sources.  Again, economics.

 

Let us remember when we speak of culture, it is the ideas, beliefs, and traditions of society, as well as illustrate the arts and man’s intellect. The U.S. Constitution is not a myth; it is a human perception of how rich folk sees life. The death penalty and forced taxation is no fantasy either. Rather these are customary policies designed for the people, not by the people. But we all go along with the ball of confusion to fit in and not be outcasts.  

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Thank you again brother Delano, although I doubt Black inmates in LA Angola prison experience a ‘warped reality.’ In fact, as I watch this documentary I’m inclined to believe Angola strengthens Black reality to the white agenda. I get a little more angry every time a tear try to form in my eye. A fourteen year sentenced to life for the questionable rape of white women who says she’ could not ID the suspect’ because all n_____’s look alike. Yet convicted by an all white jury.

 

The only thing that bothers me more is this damn idea behind the word ‘hope.’ That all this shit takes place on the watch of the damn United States Supreme Court that teases Black America with an invisible promise dressed-up in a word.

 

Yes, everybody is to blame, even me, for this great tragedy!, human beings, not killed but forbid to live.  Truth is, every time I watch the news there at home (the U.S.), read news media reports and talk with fellow American tourists visiting here I resolve more to see no home there, never to return. Maybe!

 
 

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Yes Kalexander, Black people are not the only ones who fail prey the influence of marketers, which is not synonymous with "white culture."  

 

Del, Hannibal's father's name escapes me now, but I learned about both in the documentary of Dr, Clarke's life A Great Mighty Walk (I consider it required viewing). It is also covered in his books.

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@Troy. Do you sumit there’s a difference in the prey or the difference in the way the influence is taken? Either or both, I agree. However, based on the definition of ‘culture’ (the ideas, customs, and social behaviour of a particular people or society) it is necessarily synonymous with the hegemony (those of influence or authority over others) white folk. Is it not?

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I make the distinction between our behaviors as influenced by marketers (as evidenced by our collective orgaism over the Black Panther Film) and behaviors born of traditions we create.  The former is fleeting; the later is more sustained.  

 

Now that does not mean that our culture is not influenced by the majority culture (white folks).  How could it not be? 

 

My only argument is that Black Panther is nothing more than a revenue stream for a few wealth white folks.  All this noise about a culture revolution awaken of Black pride, a renaissance in African cultural heritage, and the beginning of Black empowerment because of this film is just plain silly. 

 

The Black Panther film does not define our culture.  Our reaction to it, however, is a direct reflection of it.

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Hamilcar... I would not have recalled that one.

 

In 1966, Huey Newton, Bobby Seale, and others were in the local rec center reading issues of Marvel's Black Panther comics, inspired they decided to arm themselves and fight police brutality and start breakfast programs to ensure children were healthy.

 

I guess most would find the above perfectly plausible, but in reality the Black Panther Party predates the stupid comic book character,  Besides one is an actual panther and the some fictional king.

 

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@Troy 

1 hour ago, Troy said:

Hamilcar... I would not have recalled that one.

 

In 1966, Huey Newton, Bobby Seale, and others were in the local rec center reading issues of Marvel's Black Panther comics, inspired they decided to arm themselves and fight police brutality and start breakfast programs to ensure children were healthy.

 

I guess most would find the above perfectly plausible, but in reality the Black Panther Party predates the stupid comic book character,  Besides one is an actual panther and the some fictional king.

 

I haven't read Henrik Clarke. I liked the sarcasm, but you may want to have your assistant fact check your responses. The Black Panther predated the BPP by a few months @Troy

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@Delano Where did you get your information Wakandipedia?

 

Question (please do not respond with a question) were you entertaining the idea that the Black Panthers got their name from the comic?

 

 

Quote

“Two black Californians, Huey P. Newton and Bobby Seale, asked for permission to use the black panther emblem that the Lowndes County Freedom Organization had adopted, for their newly formed Black Panther Party.” —www.blackpast.org

 

lowdnes_county.jpg

Lowndes County Freedom Organization was founded in 1965. 

 

Besides, panthers is like tigers, lions, whatever, are common symbols of clubs  teams, or organization -- not particularly creative or unique. 

 

The movie will do no more for Black people than the comic Del.  Think it through man, 'cause you won't find a historical precedent.

 

 

 

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You should check your facts. Lowndes County Freedom  Fighters are not the BPP. The Black Panther character predates the BPP. I use to quote you to make a point. No longer.

Go check your facts you are wrong, afterwards you can admit you were wrong. @Troy

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Brothers, brothers, brothers; nothing new under the sun is original. To imply the political activists organization The Black Panther Party was inspired by a comic book character is conjecture at best; at worst it is total disrespect for one of the original, most effective African American youth organizations of 1960’s America.

 

Use of the ‘common name’ black panther does not, can not legally or otherwise infringe on predate usage. BEWARE of efforts designed to delegitmize,  demonize Black movements that frighten White America. It’s the same tactic used that (only marginally) finally brought down the Black Panther Party movement. I can not personally call myself a member of the Black Panther Party, but I’ve reached out to some relatives who were original members or supported the movement. Angela Davis, Stanley Deacon Alexander, Charlene Michell, No return comments yet.

 

I can say with certainty, however, the Black Panther logo, mission statement, etc. was not representative of fighting city crime. Not ever racism (at first). They were originally organized as a breakfast program to feed Black children before school.  Activities from there are a matter of history.

 

Black youths whose focused, directed anger caused alarm to National security so great that the U.S. Congress, FBI, CIA and local law enforcement employed a think tank for direction in strategy to deal with the ‘black question.’

 

And why not? The comic book character captured public imagination of a crusader who fought for the underdog but was ultimately denounced by the system.

 

Brother Delano, I understand and respect the anger inside you but, please, brother don’t allow conjecture and wishful thinking to distort the reality you know to be true. Unfortunately, we Black folk really fail to think, rethink, and think again before we express ourselves. And when we do it usually blacken someone’s eye.

 

I somewhat loss it for brother Huey P. when he designed those damn men jeans while in jail, exposing the bottocks. But it helped the brother pull himself up after he was released; his other fastion design projects fail flat.

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@Delano you are so hung up on being right you are blinded to the opportunity to learn anything.  I'm surprised by this. 

 

You asked if the BPP party was inspired by the comic.  That was silly on it's face, but I played along and showed where the BPP got their logo and inspiration from. 

 

If it makes you happy to believe that the Black Panther Party was inspired by Stan Lee's character, because it "proves" me wrong go right ahead.  I can no longer help you.  But consider this; while you run around rejecting truth, you've failed to produce a stitch of evidence to the contrary...

 

 

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HEY EVERYBODY, hold onto your butts; there’s a lot of chatter about former President Barack and Michelle Obama in talks with Netflix to produce a series of TV shows. I’m almost ready to declare “I told you so” or “I’m surprised’ even before speculation of a debut.

 

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@Troy you could search the dates of inception. You could look up Lowndes County Freedom fighters history. You could have looked up where is Lowndes County. You could have read the letter you posted. Any one of those things would have shown you your error. The beauty is I didn't ask you to believe me I said go find out. 

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The Black Panther debuted in July 1966 the Black Panther party October 1966. If you want to argue when the idea for either occurred go ahead. I have nothing else to say.

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Yes, brother @Delano, be that as it may but dates, in this instance, are barely proof that the Black Panther movement was actually inspired by the comic book, it can support your theory, but inconclusively.  To know for sure one would have to ask the founders. Moreover, the word black panther is a common term. Hence, common words, terms, and phases cannot be copyrighted, trademarked or owned by anyone, thus, would not require permission to use. Your argument may be correct as an assessment but not definitive or a conclusive fact. I applaud your persistence in shifting through the data for a truth though.

 

Ever wonder why the original IBM Corp. couldn't copyright the word 'computer'? Because the abacus was the original computer, acknowledged and used worldwide. If it could Africa could sue every school library and person who ever used the words black panther as could Egyptians for use of the word abacus. 

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@Troy @Kalexander2

http://www.itsabouttimebpp.com/BPP_Newspapers/htm/Its_About_Time_The_Archives_of_Billy_X_Jennings.htm

 

No connection between BPP and Black Panther. What's cool is I said I don't know @Troy

Just to be totally clear. I am not posting this to say the comic influenced the party. But to refute your statement about the ridiculousness of the connection.

 

_DSC5483.jpg

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@Delano & @Zaji, Black Panther, the movie, indeed, stimulated African American emotions as well as White emotions (inspired) but to what end? Seems White folks have more of something to despise and Black folk are seemingly doing nothing more than celebrating the ‘we can make believe too’ or ‘what if’ we had similar imagination. Which is not the call to action or change of thinking which ‘inspiration’ is meant to do.

 

White folk looking at photos of Blacks hanging from trees are inspiration to lynch more or imagine a world where it’s legal and okay to kill Black folk. With the exception of some, Blacks point to the same photo and complain.

 

Inspiration of the Black Panther Party sprung into action from empirical experience living in America. What was the ultimate plight of that movement? The NAACP was inspired observing policies aimed to permanently cement marginalization of Blacks to only end up in the State Department’s pockets. The Nation of Islam was inspired by all the above, especially power of Christianity in Government; to see Malcolm X assassinated after his inspirational pilgrimage to the Kaaba in Mecca. No way was American going to let him bring the message of true Islamic thinking to Black folk, not with the BBP, NAACP, Martin Luther King, James Baldwin, and others waking folks for their slumber. Not when it's easier to sway Honorable Elijah Muhammad who had already begun practicing ways of White folk.

 

I apologize for being a bit long-winded here but it’s important brother @Troy be understood. White America’s effort to discourage Blacks has, for the most part, worked. The movie does nothing more than give Blacks some quality family time at the theater, a box of popcorn, and a sense of false pride while the studios make bank deposits.

 

That’s what I think the brother is saying. I invite him to correct me if I’m wrong. Where pure simplicity is a form of complete excellence I am always suspicious of the one-size fits all rationale. That the inspiration of art, ideas makes beauty of the ‘intangible’ an of intellectual importance.  

 

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That’s wise to avoid time not well spent. But as a thinking, involved Black man you should be always prepared to question everyone’s belief, including your own.

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Brother @Delano, if it’s an argument vs. a debate you want. You just got it, brother. That’s like saying you have no goals or aspirations to achieving something worthwhile. When in-fact you are ‘engaged’ right now at this very moment. As I previously asserted with great conviction “Black folk really fail to think, rethink, and think again before we express ourselves” have you any idea what it means to be disengaged with the beliefs of other people? I mean, come on, brother, really? I do believe that’s the first time post I’ve read where you make absolutely no sense at all!

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@Delano, but it really is the same world. Yes? And I assure you I live in the same world as you. But what I don’t understand is why, how a brother as yourself victimized by the system in ways most common among our Black brothers, incarceration, poverty, and lack of exposure remain to be suckas and fall for the same hoky dok time and again.

 

What you need, brother, is a check-up from the neck up. And a not a doctor, but some college text books to expand your own horizons.

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@Delano, damn brother, that took some guts to disavow other members vindication of academic exposure. And I thank you for such honesty; which goes to my point (subject to your honesty) that Black folk with limited academic exposure does, not only, have the ability to absorb advanced information but can go beyond with just empirical exposure to life in America. Hence, even I had to accept the other member's assertions because of already informed commentary.

 

Just think, @Delano, how dangerous you’d be with a BA, or MA strapped to your side, the sort of reckoning that makes America quiver at the knees without someone convincing you that really can’t do it?

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@Kalexander2 all cynicism and jokes aside Del has a business degree from one of the top business schools on Earth.

 

Indeed, he earned his before I did.  I'd also argue that he understood the "value" of said degree before I did too.

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Africans abroad are probably more susceptible to American propaganda that Americans are. 

 

 

Al Jazeers's title: "Movie critics have praised the film, but cultural critics argue Marvel Studios, and its parent company Disney, may be exploiting black political and cultural movements for their own financial gain."

 

I'm obviously in the cultural critics corner. 

 

The Root's title: "Audiences Across Africa Hail Black Panther for Humanizing Black Characters"

 

As expected they are all-in when it comes to promoting Marvel propaganda.

 

Quartz's title, “Black Panther” is now the highest grossing film ever in East, West and southern Africa.

 

{Yawn}

 

Interesting Al Jazeera reported that there is a boycott petition going around.  All is not lost, but no one is gonna stand up to Disney and more than they'd stand up to Amazon or Facebook. 

 

 

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