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Delano

Black Female Writers

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There was never a shortage of Black women for anything.  Just a shortage of opportunities.

 

I read about a 5th of the quotes. I'm not clear why being a staff writer, more than once, is bad.

 

 

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Delano
 

Lol.....

Here you go again speaking for and advocating the issues of Black women.

We currently have atlest 3 AfroAmerican women who frequent this forum, yet you reliably seem to feel Black women need YOU as their advocate and spokesperson.

 


My question for you is what exactly is it about  THIS particular article that grabbed your attention?
 

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6 hours ago, Delano said:

https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/features/meet-lena-waithes-black-women-who-brunch-next-big-tv-scribes-1165252?fbclid=IwAR3rqtX1Q-YuahyoTIhgpVsByuyKg2PDPN_jUxJzqrUERYkMoCEbfHJb9vI

 

@Delano  This is a perfect example of how black women are no longer waiting for anyone to advocate for them but them.  I was recently invited to cover a similar gathering  of black women fine artists - and the founder who set up a Art workspace here in the Atlanta Metro.  Through the non-profit, TILA Studios, 10 artist fellows got the opportunity to show at Art Basel this year - and with the financial support of the email marketing company, MailChimp. 

Following in the steps of Mary McLeod Bethune ; we, black women, in the arts are now forming networking clubs  for and by  us.  

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1 hour ago, Mel Hopkins said:

This is a perfect example of how black women are no longer waiting for anyone to advocate for them but them.

 

Men need to do this.

 

Would this have gotten any coverage were it not for the Hollywood Reporter covered it?

 

The New York Times did a simmilar photo shoot. The biggest difference was that the women are organized, where these brothers, serveral of whom i know and virtually all i have supported are not. This is a profoundly important difference.

 

Here too, if the New York Times did not do this would it be noteworthy? 

 

3 hours ago, Pioneer1 said:

yet you reliably seem to feel Black women need YOU as their advocate and spokesperson.

 

I priase Del for sharing this article. However, to your point, that is just the way he is wired and It is all good. It takes all types of men to make an interesting world.

 

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28 minutes ago, Troy said:

This is a profoundly important difference.

 

@Troy Is it different because black men aren't willing to network and support each other in the book publishing? 

 

I think with older folks there's a fear of congregating and supporting one another - but like with Joshua generation, young people don't share  those fears. 

 

From my research it appears black men in Hollywood have their own "fraternity"  And they promote each other to the white power structure.  For example, that's how "Get out" got made. Also  Hollywood's black men storytellers (directors, showrunners, et al) seem to also network and support  black women storytellers (Directors, Screenwriters producers et al) 

 

So at least our stories are making it to the silver screen (For the record, I'm not talking about Black Panther ).  I interviewed an actress-producer whose short film won a Student Academy Award.  The director is a young black woman - who is now in the league with Spike Lee when he was starting out. The film was produced by two black women BUT some financing and support also came from the white Hollywood.   

So maybe that's why Hollywood Reporter covered the women... not for them but to alert the current power structure.  Could be the same with the black men writers. 
 

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1 hour ago, Mel Hopkins said:

Is it different because black men aren't willing to network and support each other in the book publishing

 

In virtually ALL industries I've worked in this has been the case. Publishing is particularly difficult because Black men are largely absent. I seriously doubt you could find half 62 Black men in big 5 NY publishing. People like me do not count.

 

1 hour ago, Mel Hopkins said:

 

I think with older folks there's a fear of congregating and supporting one another - but like with Joshua generation, young people don't share  those fears. 

 

I do not believe this is a function of age. Most Black men do not congregate. It is not very conducive to success. You really have to immerse yourself in the dominant culture. Where you live, work, and play are a function of and validated by the majority's culture. 

 

Of course in mainstream publidhing it is far worse. The sisters are largely supportive.  The Brothers are not -- there simply are nit enough of them and less than handful that i could possibly engage with have bever demonstrated a willingness.

 

Honestly AALBC is underutilized by mainstream publishing it is a platform that would only get stronger with more patronage -- which would increase the benefit i can provide. But mainstream publishing is not exactky know for thinkning out the box. 

 

Well if there is a similar group for Black male Hollywood writers that is good. 

 

I wonder why these groups have to be gender based?

 

When i first started AALBC. There was a group called BWIP (Black Women in Publishing). There allowed men to attend their meeting and a Brother was the treasurer. Years later the group changed its name to Black Americans in Publishing and disbanded shortly after that. 

 

Ultimately these "Black" groups were replaced by "diverse" affinity group effectively erasing any benefit to Black people...

 

I could go on and on about the disappearance of pro Black groups in publishing. Sometimes i feel like a dinosaur advocating for Black folks--like some holdover from the Black Power movement. 

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On 12/7/2018 at 1:53 AM, Pioneer1 said:

Lol.....

Here you go again speaking for and advocating the issues of Black women

I didn't write the article. There's no editorial content in my post. I haven't said anything. 

 

On 12/7/2018 at 1:53 AM, Pioneer1 said:


My question for you is what exactly is it about  THIS particular article that grabbed your attention?

I posted it because I thought Troy and Mel would be interested in the article. 

 

 

On 12/7/2018 at 5:27 AM, Troy said:
On 12/7/2018 at 1:53 AM, Pioneer1 said:

yet you reliably seem to feel Black women need YOU as their advocate and spokesperson.

 

I priase Del for sharing this article. However, to your point, that is just the way he is wired and It is all good. It takes all types of men to make an interesting world.

Interesting since I was thinking of you when I came across this on Facebook. So even though I am posting it for you ,  you think I am advocating for women. @Troy

 

@Mel men in general don't make an effort to socialise with each other.

Maybe former Drug Lords can conduct workshops on creating and profitable and we'll structured organisation. 

 

The comments here answer or speak to some dynamics that plague the Black community .Someone can try to explain this to Pioneer.

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, Troy said:

 

I priase Del for sharing this article. However, to your point, that is just the way he is wired and It is all good. It takes all types of men to make an interesting world.

I have people tell me I am quirky, non aggressive , sensitive, good cook, good dancer, psychic, smart. So for a lot of people that makes me gay. 

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2 hours ago, Troy said:

Most Black men do not congregate.

 @Troy 

 

Except that is not true of the Black Elite ... which might speak volumes to their financial and professional success.  

 

There is: 

 

The Boule, 100 Black Men,

 

Alpha Phi Alpha, Kappa Alpha Psi, Omega Psi Phi, Phi Beta Sigma,  

 

The Freemasons...

1 hour ago, Delano said:

@Mel men in general don't make an effort to socialise with each other.

@Delano so do you think the working class congregate at the barbershops - and form only transient relationships? 

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26 minutes ago, Mel Hopkins said:
1 hour ago, Delano said:

@Mel men in general don't make an effort to socialise with each other.

@Delano so do you think the working class congregate at the barbershops - and form only transient relationships

That the club and the pub are accidental. 

 

I feel women are more social or put more value on social exchange. Or at least that's my perception. 

Friends of my mother have contacted and visited me in Sydney a decade after her death. 

Mind that had not been in contact with me in over 20 years. But they had the initiative and social connections to do so. 

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7 minutes ago, Delano said:

I feel women are more social or put more value on social exchange.

 

Oh, I get it! I tend to stay to myself but I force myself to mimic the behavior of my family and friends who are extremely social - they believe in being present. But I also find this to be the same for my men friends (not sexual) as well.  

 

Maybe  this might be a “tribal” behavior and not gender-based. (I don’t know because I’m a loner) 

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6 hours ago, Delano said:

So for a lot of people that makes me gay

 

Nope not gay just special  (seriously no tongue in cheek - honest). It takes all kinds of men to make the world interesting.

 

5 hours ago, Mel Hopkins said:

Except that is not true of the Black Elite ...

 

@Mel Hopkins this is why i have a special affinity for the NOI. They will help you if you are poor, incarcerated, uneducated. As far as the Boule I've heard of them, but they may well be Martians as far as im concerned. Besides most Black people are not "Elite" using your word for what presume mean rich.

 

At the risk of sounding sexist Women are demonstrably better at organizing than men ALL the book related groups and organizations i work with are run by women. 

 

Even groups, like churches, which have male leaders are supported by women in the background.

 

Men now if you need something killed like a mastadon, an invading army, a rival gang, an indegenous population of people, men are pretty good at that.

 

 

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6 hours ago, Troy said:

this is why i have a special affinity for the NOI. They will help you if you are poor,

@Troy We were talking about men forming groups and helping each other in their vocations.  The groups I listed are men’s peer groups in response to your comment that men don’t congregate. These men don’t seem to have a problem gathering together to achieve social, professional and political  goals.

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@Mel Hopkins im not disputing what you are saying im just sharing my perspective.

 

58 minutes ago, Mel Hopkins said:

in response to your comment that men don’t congregate.

 

Mel, i NEVER wrote this. I'm aware of the Black greek organizations. In college they hosted most if the parties. In fact i gave you examples of men congregating like in armies and the NOI.

 

But  women's groups have been far and away more support of AALBC. That is a fact, and it does not dispute what wrote.

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Del

have people tell me I am quirky, non aggressive , sensitive, good cook, good dancer, psychic, smart. So for a lot of people that makes me gay.


Naahhh, I'm not sure if I buy that one.

I grew up in an AfroAmerican community and have lived in and interacted with AfroAmerican communities all over the nation so I'm qualified to say that just about the only way a man gets labled "gay" in the Black community (besides actually being gay) is:

a) If you exhibit feminine mannerisms commonly associated with females like how you talk, sit, hand gestures, ect...

or

b) Exhibit behavior that may be perceived as cowardice when challenged like always running from and trying to avoid physical confrontations


Now understand that I DON'T agree with these assumptions because a man could be gay as hell and still be maculine and brave, however those traits I outlined above are what usually gets males labled as "gay" in most Black American communities.
....not being smart, knowing how to cook, or reading a lot.

I may not have your smarts but my mother taught me how to read at 3 years of age and have loved reading ever since.
I was rarely seen without a book even while growing up in the hood  and even now but my masculinity was NEVER called into question.

So whether it's justified or not, it's how you carry yourself that makes people question your sexual and gender status not how smart you are.


 

 



Troy

I share your observations that AfroAmerican men tend not to socialize with eachother for the heck of it as much as AfroAmerican women do. Especially those of the lower socio-economic classes.

And probably for the same reasons me and Del was talking about. Many AfroAmerican men of lower socio-economic status think it's not very masculine for men to bunch up together and just sit around and talk with eachother....and would probably see it as a form of GOSSIP....not realizing the importance of NETWORKING.

AfroAmerican men will get together when a CLEAR PURPOSE FOR MEETING is given; like to discuss a business opportunity, to plan some sort of event, or to discuss a particular problem.

But to just get together and chit-chat for the hell of it, most brothers aren't into that.
There ususally has to be a clear purpose or goal in mind.

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@Mel Hopkins yes that is my quote, but your are taking out of context and naking an absolute. 

 

First, i said most not all; and second, i was talking in the context of the work environment and publishing. Q-dogs aren't setting up Black groups the help brothers in publishing.

 

Generally brothers with power in corporations just do the basic stuff that any white boy does. They dont congregate because they need to do the stuff that is gonna advance their careers and hangin out with the brothers is not gonna make that happen.

 

@Pioneer1 i was a gymnast that was considered gay. I did the cooking for my family that was considered weak. Many guys take pride in having they women cook for them. I settle fir live and respect. 

 

As i get older i notice guys would do stuff that we would all call gay in the past, like hugging each other, saying i love you, or talking about feelings and revealing weaknesses or fears -- talking about meaningful stuff not just sexual conquests or sports...

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7 hours ago, Pioneer1 said:

Del

have people tell me I am quirky, non aggressive , sensitive, good cook, good dancer, psychic, smart. So for a lot of people that makes me gay.


Naahhh, I'm not sure if I buy that one.

I grew up in an AfroAmerican community and have lived in and interacted with AfroAmerican communities all over the nation so I'm qualified to say that just about the only way a man gets labled "gay" in the Black community (besides actually being gay) is

When I was a kid in the Bronx circa 1971-1980. You would insult another boy by calling him gay or a homo. Which had nothing to do with sexual preference or behavior. There was a hair salon run by a gay man. That liked boys. This was about 1980 the gheri curl was in fashion. I believe it cost about $50. The rumour was that boys that wanted that style but didn't have the money, traded sex. There were always Black teenage boys in the shop. I saw one of the kids from the nrugbirhood with a gheri curl. When we made eye contact he looked downward. We made fun of him later and speculated about the rumour. 

 

The irony is that none of the my boys every verbally or physically hassled gay men. In addition they used to go to The Paradise Garage on gay night and would get in because they were teenagers. 

 

Your experience isn't universal. Rap, Dance music, and the Garage sound was a big part of our upbringing. Sparing and playing the dozens. 

 

There isn't one person who knows me who thinks I am gay. So there some type of projection happening. Pioneer you posted a story about a Japanese guy that was in love with you. Did you encourage him or did you beat him off. 

@Pioneer1

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28 minutes ago, Troy said:

yes that is my quote, but your are taking out of context and naking an absolute. 

 

First, i said most not all; and second, i was talking in the context of the work environment and publishing. Q-dogs aren't setting up Black groups the help brothers in publishing.

 

Generally brothers with power in corporations just do the basic stuff that any white boy does. They dont congregate because they need to do the stuff that is gonna advance their careers and hangin out with the brothers is not gonna make that happen.

 

@Troy You made two specific statement that came to full stop.

 

It wasn’t an absolute because you also said “Most” but your statement didn’t say most black men don’t congregate.  It’s not conducive to PUBLISHING success.  

 

You wrote  in that sentence: “It’s not conducive to success”

 

I didn’t make it an absolute - I responded to your claim.  

 

I mentioned  fraternities, but I also gave examples of the freemasons, The BOULE , 100 black men etc. 

 

Even If you look up the membership of THE BOULE you will see those men didn’t come to play on any white boy level.  And even white boys know it.  These men play at the level of self-proclaimed nobility.  What  I know of some of the fraternity men - they do too. Some of the frat members are in the Boule’. 

 

 So in this case, moderate-to-working class black men may not network -but the boys with big suspenders do...  

 

Maybe that’s what’s missing in your quest to get middle-aged black men noticed. - There needs to be unity among black men at all levels of the economic ladder. We women can’t continue to be your biggest supporters. Y’all have to be each other’s support. 

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3 hours ago, Pioneer1 said:


So whether it's justified or not, it's how you carry yourself that makes people question your sexual and gender status not how smart you are.

I have  been mislabelled by appearances my entire life. However I can't let other people's ignorance and myopia shape my self worth. That's imbibing the foolishness of others. I am not a sophomore. 

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3 minutes ago, Mel Hopkins said:

There needs to be unity at all levels of the economic ladder.

What rung displays unity? And is it because it's the best option. Expedient or the only viable option. I am specifically thinking about Jay Z and Puffy. Where would you place Russell Simmons Spike Lee, and Reggie Lewis?

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I'm always suspicious of male homophobes.  i'm among those who wonder if these guys hate gay men because the latter make them question their own manhood. There was a time when men didn't wear cologne because it was considered for sissies.  Now male cologne is a staple in a man's accessories. 

 

i'm surprised nobody considered how street gangs are made up of males seeking a bonding experience and how their members tend to hang out together and embrace each other.  

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16 minutes ago, Delano said:

What rung displays unity? And is it because it's the best option. Expedient or the only viable option. I am specifically thinking about Jay Z and Puffy. Where would you place Russell Simmons Spike Lee, and Reggie Lewis?

 

@Delano It appears the upper rungs display unity via social and professional development.  

 

I’m on the outside but it appears these men enjoy sustained financial and professional success as music artists  turned entrepreneurs. In fact, I believe there was an article that talked about a friendly competition between Sean Combs and Jay Z and them climbing to the top of the Forbes list.  

 

They all seem to be linked in their own fraternity that looks like a venn diagram with some who are entrepreneurs, media moguls -music service streamers, Cable Network owners, filmmakers, et al. I believe Fiddy is also included in that “frat” too... The all started together so I guess as they moved up they only had each other. 

 

Most recently with Kim Porter’s death Tabloids reported how she worked behind the scenes at Bad Boy Entertainment but  I get the sense it’s an old boy’s network. 

 

I can’t answer whether black men unifying at every level will make a difference.  But I can say every financially,  professionally successful man I’ve dated participated in a network of like-minded men.  

 

29 minutes ago, Cynique said:

i'm surprised nobody considered how street gangs are made up of males seeking a bonding experience and how their members tend to hang out together and embrace each other.  

 

YES!  In fact, some say it’s the lure of that level of bonding that made them join! Yes! 

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I heard about the venture with Jay Z and Puffy. I mentioned Reggie Lewis because he was a successful deal maker. Who was cool with Michael Milliken. The biggest Wall  Street deal maker in the 80's

So I was curious about different perspective on each. In terms of the their target market or audience and who they partnered with to access capital. 

Spike Lee is a genius Marketer. He has turned a characterisation into a branding tool. That makes money across colour line without being considered a sell out. Doing sneaker commercials with fellow Brooklyn native Michael Jordan. 

6 hours ago, Pioneer1 said:

I may not have your smarts 

I agree

Wise fool. 

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1 hour ago, Delano said:

So I was curious about different perspective on each.

@Delano As a loner,  I spend an inordinate amount of time studying people ... I could ‘t include Reginald Lewis because he died 25 years ago and wasn’t under my microscope.  I did learn about him when I was researching black wealth.  He was a Kappa - ( Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc.)  So this aspect of his profile fits into my theory ... and Spike Lee graduated from Morehouse College, As you know an HBCU for men!  Spike Lee didn’t pledge but frats and sororities were featured prominently in School Daze ..

 

Aside: Spike Lee didn’t have to sell out because he featured the middle class black slice of life in his films. A novelty in Hollywood in the late 80s Early 90s but perfect timing for the Cosby Show, “A different world”  Even the “Da Sweet blood of Jesus” showed upscale blacks ... And remember he also featured Public Enemy on the soundtrack of “Do the right thing”  and the promotion too! I agree he’s a marketing genius.  He filmed DTRT in my old neighborhood.

 

but I digress.  

 

I think you’ve raised another issue about black men networks:  how they get their money for these ventures isn’t common knowledge.  Do a search on how Jay Z paid for Tidal or Sean paid for Revolt network and see what comes up.  I did spy how Fiddy got money for his film production company - but that took a lot of sleuthing.  

 

Thank You for this! I  hadn’t really noticed the connection between black men networks and success.

 

Hmm, Maybe that’s why white men won’t let white women in their clubs 😳😳😳

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Things have probably changed since my exposure to black fraternities, but it used to be that one of their selling points in recruiting pledges was the promise that  in the post-college world, you would be forever connected all over the country with your frat brothers who, once that secret handshake was exchanged,  would "pull you along" if they had any clout or authority. On the campus of the U. of I. a friendly rivalry existed between the fraternities. and the members of these organizations were very tight and loyal to the brotherhood, many  forming life-long friendships. But that was over 50 years ago.  Boule  was made up almost exclusively of fraternities and sororities,  and their conventions at one time were networking events.  But that was 25 or so years ago.  Black Masonic membership has fallen way off, many lodges becoming inactive but at one time it was the same with them.  All of that may well be different now because society has  changed in the millennial world.  But i would agree that women are and always have been more interested in meeting and greeting and organizing.  

 

Currently, in my hometown, in the midst of the non-elite, there is an American Legion Hall and a VFW one, where vets hangout and play cards, shoot pool, drink and  hold social events. There are also local bowling leagues where men and women teams compete weekly as well as socialize.  What can be deduced from this? 

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On 12/7/2018 at 2:56 PM, Mel Hopkins said:

There needs to be unity among black men at all levels of the economic ladder. We women can’t continue to be your biggest supporters. Y’all have to be each other’s support. 

 

Absolutely! 

 

Sometimes I feel like we get caught up in semantics, that than the idea I'm trying to express.  I'll take responsibility for that as it may be due to a limitation of my written expression.

 

On 12/7/2018 at 3:39 PM, Cynique said:

i'm among those who wonder if these guys hate gay men because the latter make them question their own manhood.

 

Sure there are some men like this, but as Del implied it is cultural.  We grew up teasing guys that were soft on any level.  Fathers raised their boys not to cry.. to be a Man.  I was a Division 1 gymnast and got teased for that. You get used to it. As an adult I would never tease a man for being gay or failing to conform to the American standards of manhood.  But it took a lot of growing up to get to this place.  

 

Kevin Hart jokes about homsexuality because it resonates in our community that is what guys do or did.  Now as a man short in stature he man have manhood issues, but who knows...

 

On 12/8/2018 at 1:59 AM, Cynique said:

Things have probably changed since my exposure to black fraternities,

 

I'm not sure much has changed what you've described mirrors my experience.  Though membership has probably exploded since your time particularly in the sororities give the increased number of Black woman in college.

 

I know a young man who was interested in joining the Masons, for the Brotherhood aspects of it, but was rejected in the last stages because he was Catholic.

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6 hours ago, Delano said:

@Mel wait a consortium of  recording artists?  o

@Delano  why not? 🤷🏽‍♀️ Women’s groups have Su-Su...But let me get a hint that’s the case and you’ll see my expose’ in Fortune Magazine. 

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Unity is not possible. There are too many obstacles. Ego prejudice dominance envy respect. Pettiness Lust Insecurity. 

Inability to focus on the real problem. Compassion. 

10 hours ago, Cynique said:

  What can be deduced from this? 

I have no idea 

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Interested in knowing your take on this Mel. You know who I think also played the game brilliantly Melvin Van Peebles. How many hats did he wear to create and follow his vision. His career arc is amazing:Screenwriter Producer Director Actor Stock Trader Playwriter Bombardier Artist Writer Father Husband Lover. 

 

 

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16 hours ago, Troy said:

I know a young man who was interested in joining the Masons, for the Brotherhood aspects of it, but was rejected in the last stages because he was Catholic.

According to my late husband who was a Mason, this exclusion dates back centuries when Free Masons, who are a secret organization, banned Catholics from membership because it was felt that they might divulge their secrets to the Pope if asked to do so.  Later Catholics formed their own version of the Masons and they are known as the Knights of Columbus.

13 hours ago, Delano said:
On 12/8/2018 at 12:59 AM, Cynique said:

  What can be deduced from this? 

I have no idea 

My query was in regard  to the observation about black men no longer hanging out together and bonding. It was also said that this was especially true among the upper echelon of blacks.  So, i was wondering if hanging out in local American Legion and VFW halls or being teammates in bowling leagues , is an example of non-elite black dudes still gathering in groups. 

12 hours ago, Delano said:

You know who I think also played the game brilliantly Melvin Van Peebles. How many hats did he wear to create and follow his vision. His career arc is amazing:Screenwriter Producer Director Actor Stock Trader Playwriter Bombardier Artist Writer Father Husband Lover. 

Are you talking about Melvin Van Peebles or his son, Mario?  

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On 12/8/2018 at 1:59 AM, Cynique said:

Boule  was made up almost exclusively of fraternities and sororities,  and their conventions at one time were networking events.

 

@Cynique  This is still true although “Boule” in this context refers to the biennial meeting of my sorors of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.  

 

“The Boule’  (Sigma Pi Phi) the organization of  Black Elite Men is still strong today with an estimated 5000 members who contain some of the same Black men who have chaired or still sit on the boards of the largest corporations, serve in the U.S. Government ; executive level of the nation’s  top universities such as Gregory Vincent  

https://www.linkedin.com/in/gregory-vincent-681232b/

 

The fraternities of the Divine Nine still have the same mission - Of course I’m not a member but last year an A phi A  friend of mine called, seemingly,  to make sure I’d put in a word with my Kappa baby-daddy  because he wanted to host a party at my baby-daddy’ and his powerful attorney wife’s martha’s vineyard home for a New York political candidate.

 

 It happened.  

 

I’m a degree away from the “elites” and their power moves;  but to be honest, I never felt comfortable in their world , choosing not to even marrying into it when the opportunity arose. 

 

   @Troy Lawrence Otis Graham wrote a book on “Our Kind of People” and that book just scratched the surface of Old Money Black Elite... but it’s not fiction or old news.  

 

One of my best friends, I met at Tech, came from that world.  She was kind of a rebel; graduating from Ethical Culture Fieldston School  before attending  and graduating Tech, from Mount Holyoke, and from Cornell with a JD/MBA.  She was so “fancy” she opened a literary gallery in SoHo prominently featuring bchildren’s book black illustrators... I went to the opening it was fabulous! Never seen it duplicated. 

 

But I digress. 

 

That world exist and hasn’t lost its steam or exclusive membership.  While not at the level of “The Boule”  in political power, but in numbers, recently,  the Kappas came out to support their frat Colin  Kaepernick.  These black men still congregate but maybe not to “chit chat” but with an social political and economic agenda. 

 

Anyway, to Delano’s comment I guess there’s no “fighting, egoism et al in the upper echelon of society because they’re the folks who throw away the scraps “we” fight over.  

 

@Delanoas for “Sweet, SweetBack, Badass Song” Director  -I have no opinion but  in the late 90s he told a reporter he didn’t have a PHd in Negrology and I’ve used that line ever since.  

 

 

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@Mel HopkinsOK,  in Chicago, there's an organization referred as The Assembly, which annually hosts a kind of mini-pan hellenic gathering during the Christmas holiday season and some people loosely call it "boule".  All of this is too "chi-chi" for my taste but my in-laws were on the fringes of it. Just out of curiosity i checked the definition of the word "boule" which i assumed was "French" in its origins. It is, and one of its 3 definition is: "Boule In cities of ancient Greece, the boule was a council of citizens appointed to run daily affairs of the city."  So, that makes sense. 

 

@Del Melvin's son Mario has an equally impressive resume that rivals his father's. 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Cynique said:

All of this is too "chi-chi" for my taste but my in-laws were on the fringes of it

@Cynique  Same here.  It becomes an insufferable bore because of what’s NOT being said.  I can’t tell you how many times I’ve found myself in a “pearls-clutching” scenario  either because of what I said or did.  My bestie could hang;, her “extensive” training left them groveling and in tears when necessary - she didn’t play.

 

@Delano yes! I’ve followed Mario’s career and his daughter played in his SyFy show “Superstition” .  The narrative rivaled Neil Gaiman’s  “American Gods” because it resurrected the African Gods and Goddesses of old and wrote and produced a TV series around them.  I don’t think it was renewed but it was excellent.  Maybe someone will write a book based on it. 

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I am largely unaware of his profile. I saw him in Rappin and New Jack City. I thought Krush Groove was a better film than Rappin. And King of New York was better than New Jack City. 

Although I have to give him credit since both films were topical. 

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Flip It

Cynique

 

 

I'm always suspicious of male homophobes. i'm among those who wonder if these guys hate gay men because the latter make them question their own manhood.


.....and THIS, from the same person who said in another thread:

"
Political correctness is becoming as stifling as those it targets. It is totally shutting down comedy and satire, forbidding people to laugh at the foibles of the human condition. "

https://aalbc.com/tc/topic/5550-kevin-hart-shows-some-heart/

 
So which is it Lady Liberty?

Should people have the right to express their own opinion without being shamed, or does any attempt to criticize homosexuality deserve your suspicion as being homophobic????

 

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