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NubianFellow

Black Women Are Beautiful Naturally

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@Cynique I am not offended sista. You look great! Hey, weave is not my thing and when I protest it I am mainly focused on young black girls who do suffer from poor self esteem issues. Perhaps this is because I have young black girls in my family that I genuinely care about and want to empower them to the fullest extent. Will I be happy once weaves become a less common practice? Absolutely! Do I understand that there are a variety of reasons why some women choose to wear weaves? Yes.

 

Truthfully, it's not so much about standing up to white folks as it is about black people loving who they are. I think that is needed in the fights we have ahead. I could care less about getting white people to treat us more fairly. I don't believe that will bring about any real change. I think there are things we can do and should do ourselves that will move us much farther ahead.

 

Your hair doesn't offend me but I am sorry if my question offended you, as that was not my intention, nor my intention behind my intention.

 

Though I believe that black women rely too heavily on weave and wish that wasn't the case, I have no problem with women who embrace weaves. I think this may also be a generational thing as well. Your reasons for wearing weave could have solid reasonable explanation. In most cases, I don't believe that sound judgement is involved in women who feel the need to wear weaves. At the end of the day, I am only a guy with an opinion and a viewpoint. Do you sis!

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Nubian you say Black Women are beautiful as they are, yet you can't accept Cynique choosing to wear a wig. 

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@NubianFellowOK, we cool.  😗

 

7 minutes ago, Delano said:

Nubian you say Black Women are beautiful as they are, yet you can't accept Cynique choosing to wear a wife.

 

@DelI was a wife, but i aint never worn one. 🤤

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@Delano Dear brother, I think anything that challenges popular views and culture is definitely 100 percent conscious! I am only presenting a viewpoint that is unpopular in the black community during this present time, but the conversation is only getting started. I get it. We are told to leave our women's hair alone and not mention it or bring it up. And many black women are determined to defend wearing weave. I understand the social behavior all too well. I still like presenting ideas that challenge people's thinking. Some of the things expressed to me may actually change my own perception further down the road. I may be able to reflect on this specific conversation and say to myself, "I get it now." I haven't reached that point yet but I am aware that I have not finished growing and learning. My reality changes daily based on how I choose to perceive the world around me.

 

Black women have always been on the front line for black men and black men have always led. I believe that once that becomes compromised, then it is not a good sign. I also believe that at the end of the day, black women choose to be led. 

 

Before we engage in any war that doesn't involve us as a collective, we will lose any other war. Therefore, we have to choose our battles wisely. On the war about belief and ideology, the monster we call the internet is a powerful tool. I believe the internet alone is responsible for the new awakening that black people seem to be witnessing across the board and it's a beautiful thing. Today, black people are questioning things they wouldn't have known about nor had the opportunity to know about 20 years ago. There is so much information and ideas online that we feed each other. I believe it's a good thing though it can also be confusing at times because we are presented with so many contrasting viewpoints.

 

I believe I am able to witness something that has never been witnessed before. I believe change is happening and I'm pretty sure it's for the best. Young kids are fed up with gangsta rap music. Finally, gang bangers are being referred to as the real sellouts. The democratic party is being challenged. Black people are talking about going to Africa and building and investing. Relations between Africans and African Americans along with other Diaspora Africans seem to be improving. I think we are in the middle chapters of an amazing book that will contain amazing history and I am happy to experience it and be apart of it.

 

Belief and ideology are the principles that define black people. Our culture is what roots us. I believe it has always been about belief and ideology. I believe that these are the seeds planted that enable us to grow.

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14 hours ago, NubianFellow said:

Though I believe that black women rely too heavily on weave and wish that wasn't the case,

 

@NubianFellow I can definitely understand your statements here! But in an earlier statement, you said something about 'shaming women' and I don't think though, that would be a good thing to do. I do believe that in today's world, we are constantly being exploited and I can understand why some Black men like you see that side of it--in that some black women rely too heavily on weaves. But I also think too, that this society does use Black men too, and have conditioned you to be too extreme about this subject. NubianFellow, as I said previously, this issue goes way back in time before todays world has been able to make weaves too avaliable to exploit. Women have been wearing weaves, wigs, braided extensions for a long time for various reasons!--Yes, young women too!

 

I am not college age young anymore, and I love my natural hair, and have not altered it with chemicals for more than 25+ years or wear weaves extensively, but there are valid reasons too, why some young women would do this. Do I believe it is being done to the level of excessiveness? absolutely. Do I understand your point? Absolutely.

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22 hours ago, NubianFellow said:

Furthermore, from my own perspective, I actually believe that the black men who defend weave or don't oppose it in any way are the real culprits of exploiting black women.

 

@NubianFellow I sort of understand what you mean. But there is always a middle ground of respect too, when it comes to this issue, and Black men should never shame Black women, though. 

22 hours ago, NubianFellow said:

I also feel that if all black men just go along with black women wearing weaves then black women will never be ashamed and will feel no need to correct this behavior eventually. Yes, it may be a form of a shaming tactic, ...

 

Oh no. This should never be. How can a Black man, who should be considered and respected, shame a black woman into gaining self esteem, and thus be respected as a man and a leader as well? 

 

If some black women feel that they have gained self-esteem by wearing weaves, then shaming them will definitely not work. Black men need to understand all sides of this issue too. Wearing weaves, wigs and extensions will probably never be 'corrected behavior' as you have stated! Women both young and old have various valid reasons for doing this, and so, that is 'a natural behavior' for certain reasons.

 

Some young women have problems with hair thinning too.

Some young women may have cancer and this becomes a need!

Some Black women do not have kinky hair, but combination hair, wavy hair, cury hair and even straight hair! So, they may want to do different things too, to enhance their look. This should not be an issue. etc. 

22 hours ago, NubianFellow said:

When is the last time you heard about or seen a black woman buy black textured and bragged about it being 100 percent African hair? Probably never.

 

Oh no. You are wrong on this one!

I applaud Chris Rock for his efforts though, because he and others did a lot to make natural hair extension, wigs and weaves become more avaliable! But I have never worn 'straight hair typed' weaves, or extensions--NEVER!

Before Chris Rock spoke out against this, Beverly Johnson actually had natural hair extension products avaliable and used to buy them. And now that they are now sold, many Black women prefer this more than the straight type. But again, remember, Black women don't all have kinky hair! And, there is nothing wrong with wanting to have straight-type hair do, imo. Some Black women, seem to have a face for it, and look gorgeous. 

Again, though brother, I do believe that there is a self hatred thing going on, and some Black people, men and women, can hide behind real issues to continue. Tht is sad and I hope things get better. I know these issue do need to be addressed.  

 

15 hours ago, Cynique said:

 

 

Image may contain: Connie Bradley, smiling, closeup       Image may contain: Connie Bradley, smiling, standing and outdoor

 

Pretty girl!

I like both styles!

 

10 minutes ago, Chevdove said:

In spite of your opinion, head wraps are not my thing.  I wouldn't be caught dead wearing one. ...

 

Ditto.

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Cynique

I'm trying to figure out why do you have the SAME expression in EVERY photo?

Whether you're standing there in the front yard or out with your daughters showing off new shoes, you have that expression.
When you're sitting to a table full of cake with a paper cap on your head celebrating your birthday, you have that expression.
Even in a photo 30 years ago when you were wearing an Afro you had that SAME expression on your face.
You seem to have only ONE expression.....lol.

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@Chevdove The shaming is something that is happening and will continue to happen. This is being done collective and is apart of our social behavior. Though it's not a tactic I personally use, I do feel that sometimes it is warranted and perhaps necessary. Don't you remember? Back in the 80's black men had to see themselves and needed to be shamed for wearing Jerry curls and perms. Shaming has power in the black community. One day Jerry Curls were the thing and selling out, and the next day they were calling them "Sweet Chucks." Hell, I got teased for having one and I never put any chemicals in my hair - ever. You know J-Curls were out of style when Ice Cube got rid of his. And the thing about J-Curls is that it doesn't make the hair look Caucasian. Jerry Curl's seem to relax the curls that black people naturally have, so not the same as actually wearing weave but perhaps just as bad putting chemicals in the hair. I am happy those chemical products went out of style.

 

If you can point out any instance of me shaming anyone, then please point that out so I can apologize. It is never my intention to purposely shame my brother's or sisters in friendly conversation. I apologize if I shamed anyone. I don't go around shaming black women but at times I can be opposing to popular social behavior and I feel that as a black man I am permitted to judge black people about their behavior, good or bad. And believe it or not, the conversation is healthy and does provoke thought and wisdom. You would be surprised how effectively we can open up how people think - women who actually listen to and take in what's being said and then decide they are going natural, just because of an intelligent and civil conversation.

 

I saw a story on the news a while ago where a Blood was speaking out on camera. He was talking against the media and how they choose what to report on about their gang activity. He complained that the media only focused on the innocent kids and mothers that they killed as well as all other types of victims. He said that the good that this gang does is never reported on and that was his complaint. Imagine a cold blooded killer who wants the media to focus on the good they do instead of the fact that they kill innocent people. 

 

There are many great attributes black women have but unfortunately, the fact that they wear weaves and wigs 98 percent of the time is something worth having a conversation about in the black community. If we are trying to raise our children to be militant and ready for the world, we don't want them growing up with the same self esteem issues our people have suffered for centuries - since we were kidnapped and held captive as prisoners of war who were forced to serve savage beings.

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On 1/29/2019 at 8:09 PM, NubianFellow said:

The shaming is something that is happening and will continue to happen. This is being done collective and is apart of our social behavior. Though it's not a tactic I personally use, I do feel that sometimes it is warranted and perhaps necessary.

 

@NubianFellow I don't feel that 'Shaming' is ever warranted or necessary coming from Black men about this particular issue of Black women wearing 'false hair'. 

 

On 1/29/2019 at 8:09 PM, NubianFellow said:

Don't you remember? Back in the 80's black men had to see themselves and needed to be shamed for wearing Jerry curls and perms.

 

And so, now, they've gone from Jerry curls and perms to obsessively SAGGIN!? WOW! That showed them! Black men have now been so shamed that they now wear their pants low to the point it is an obssession all across America. 

 

On 1/29/2019 at 8:09 PM, NubianFellow said:

Shaming has power in the black community.

 

LOL. It has power alright, the power that it carries keeps us extremely suppressed. No other culture does this attack, gender attack, on a wide-scale but Blacks. And yet, we can't see the damage it has done to our existence. This oppressive behavior of demeaning each other is so affective and has sooooooo much POWER and completely helps this government operate freely without having to deal with us unwanted people in their higher sectors. We grapple on the lower realms of society getting the crumbs while others look on, laughing at how we attack each other, destroying self images amongst each other rendering us completely unable to fight other important issues that would help to give us relief and freedom. Freedom to see a better positive image that other human beings express because they are not constantly being shamed by their men. 

 

On 1/29/2019 at 8:09 PM, NubianFellow said:

I saw a story on the news a while ago where a Blood was speaking out on camera. ...complained that the media only focused on the innocent kids and mothers that they killed ...He said that the good that this gang does is never reported on ... 

 

 I think I know what you’re getting at, here. You are comparing Black women wearing false hair to CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR being downplayed. You’re equating gang murders to Black women wearing false hair. And, you are taking it a step further and saying that we, Black women, do acknowledge that it is a CRIME TO WEAR UGLY FALSE HAIR but we want Black men to overlook this obvious crime and look at our other insignificant attributes such as our intellect or our curvy physique or etc. Nappy hairstyles count much more than anything else that we could possibly look like or do.  

 

On 1/29/2019 at 8:09 PM, NubianFellow said:

If you can point out any instance of me shaming anyone, then please point that out so I can apologize.

 

Well, I for one am happy that some Black AfroAmerican men do speak out against the obsession with Black women wearing hair weaves and extensions but however, the issue of ‘shaming’ is absolutely not good. I also agree with you that Shaming [ie. joking, mocking, ridiculing…] Black women for wearing weaves, wigs and extensions would be a big part of our culture and I also believe that has been used by this oppressive system to further their cause. I don’t know how to completely say what I believe and think that an expert on human behavior might do a better job than me in giving a more complete breakdown on what I am trying to say, but because as a Black woman, who becomes the recipient of such ‘shaming’, many of us can give some good feedback on this subject. I think that because we have been ‘conditioned’ to believe that this aspect of our culture is normal adds on to our detriment. Although Black men who do throw down Black women and use this issue as an excuse for their Self Hatred don’t need no help from White Supremacist society but it helps to the cause of both. And, I think this ‘hair issue’ stems from part of the conditioning of the past Chattel Slave System whereby the slave yard ‘Buck’ was used to attack and totally demean the Black helpless slave women first and then came the White attackers.

 

No, I absolutely do not feel that you have done anything like this intentionally, but it would be the conditioning of this system that would be a deceptive part of the intense position of ‘shaming’ that some Black men have taken against Black women on their choices in how they style their hair. You may feel that your approach may not be this or that or may not be ‘shaming tactic’ but I guess this is subjective and based on individual accounts.  Your approach may be taken as well meaning by some and not others. And your approach is well intended and so, the outcome regardless, will be good because it’s heartfelt in how you appreciate and adore Black women, but there are other Black men that may use your same approach and don’t mean Black women any good at all. So, therefore, let me offer a personal story that may help to better understand this issue:

========================================================================================================================== 

 

Decades ago when I worked as an Environmental Scientist at shipyard—MY HAIR!!! I became so tired of having to style my natural hair everyday and go to work. I worked outside in extreme elements a lot. I had to work in high temperatures in the summertime or based on the type of job I had to cover, sometimes, I sweat profusely and then went out into the cold winter weather and then back into my office building with my hair soaking wet. So one day, I impulsively decided to braid my hair and added extensions over the weekend. I didn’t give it much thought because I had done it before at another job. But when I came to work, I was confronted with a blow to my person, that I knew was wrong. The setting of the building was as such; After punching in the code to get in the building, and walking mid-way down the hallway to swipe the time-clock, and then walking further down the hallway past other office spaces, then, I entered my office space on the left. It was a rather spacious area and there were six (6) employees including myself who was the only female scientist for the north zone office that covered the environmental monitoring for the northside of the entire shipyard. My desk was straight across from the entrance to the back so when I sat, my back was to the windows and I faced the entrance. I sat in the middle of to men on either side of me, and their desk faced my desk. I faced forward and so, they were able to look up and view me in profile during the work shift. [1] On my left side of the office against the side wall area was the desk facing me of one man, a tall slender built, straight-haired Native American man, a single man--John. [2] On my right side of the office against the side wall area was the desk facing me of another man, a tall slender built dark skinned, single African American man--Doe. [3] Towards the front right was another tall slender, dark skinned, slender built, married African American man-Sam and [4] next to him was the desk of my supervisor nearest the front door, a married, tall slender White man—Clark [i.e. all of these names superficial].[5]  On the left front side was a tall, slender, older senior White man—Jim.  

 

So, Monday morning I buzzed myself into the building, punched the clock, walked into my office and sat down at my desk and I was usually the first one in the building. The second one was usually Black-Sam, the married Black man and he walked into the office and sat down and immediately, I sensed that he was alarmed and seemed cold in his initial body language. Usually, he would give the usual ‘Hey’ how you doing this morning, but he said nothing. So, I spoke, and inquired why he didn’t greet me. To my surprise, he was abrupt and blunt. He said to me, “I don’t like your hair”. And, his face was very stern as he glared at me, then he turned away and was dead quiet. Oh God, it hurt so bad. I couldn’t believe it. But I said nothing as usual. Its never been my nature to be an outward and vocal person, so I just remained quiet. And, he was never usually a vocal person either but was professional and he usually kept out of the shipyard conversations that could sometimes get vulgar. But, this morning, he shocked me. He was embarrassed by my presence with the ‘ethnic hair style’. But, in less than about ten minutes, in walked the tall and tan Cherokee man-John and he briskly walked over to his desk and sat down. After only a few quiet seconds, he said, “Damn! I love your hair! Sexy!”

 

 

Well, I was still too hurt to say much to him. But, I snickered a little, and said, “Thank you”. Then about five minutes later, my supervisor-Clark came in and sat down, looked up, and immediately said with a smile, “Hey, I like your hair!” Then a few minutes later, the last one that came in that particular day, was Black-Doe, and he came in and sat down and said, nothing. Then after few minutes, Cherokee John took a call for a job assignment, he immediately jumped up and put on his hard hat, grabbed his shipyard backpack and said to me, Come on, let’s go do this job assignment together.” So, I leaned over, got my hard hat and put it on, and I grabbed my backpack and through it over my back and out we went. … During the morning and after I got back to my desk, all day the other White men from South zone office, next door, would pop in our office and tell me that they loved my hair. They leaned against my desk and chit chatted as usual from time to time. I was the first African American Environmentalist in that building and in that huge ship yard ever and there was my friend, in the South zone office, a married, White Woman—Christian, who was the first ever women environmentalist in this shipyard ever. This shipyard was the largest in the world and second best only to a shipyard in Japan at that time. After lunch, Black-Sam picked up the phone and took a job assignment and then he grabbed his gear, and said to me, “Come on, I want to do this assignment with you.” So, I really didn’t want to go with him, but, I grabbed my hard hat and gear and went out the office with him and out the building and got in the passenger seat of the company jeep and he backed out of the lot and drove off. Inside, I was furious, but I was quiet. With in minutes, he said, “I am sorry. I want to apologize to you the way that acted this morning. I was wrong about your hair. It looks good. I am really sorry.”  I said, “okay”. …

 

At that time, I really didn’t need anyone to validate me, because, I was already confident in my appearance. I already had validation long before that point and I knew that I looked gorgeous in my youth, with or without hair extensions but, for that Black man to make a comment about my presence, and my braids, unsolicited, was wrong. It was an attack, but I am happy that he apologized. And later, that day; how many other Black men on the shipyard complimented me about my NEW-DOO!? LOL. Many! A lot of the Black men saw me in the yard that very day, with Black-Sam and came up to me and told me how much they liked my doo! LOL. But it took a very gorgeous Cherokee Indian who had women constantly falling at his feet, and other White men to ‘shame’ Black-Sam and Black-Doe that day. But I do want to say this; there is so much pressure put against Black men on accepting any and everything negative about Black women and this does put Black men in a terrible position and vice-versa. And for this reason, I did not hold this experience against the two brothers in my office.

 

There is more to this story too, though… in the tune of job sexual harassment that I endured from both Black-Doe of whom, I did have a crush on, and Cherokee-John… I did have a crush on Black-Doe, but I did not want the relationship to go anywhere at that time, because I was stressed, very depressed due to my situation with my mother, and trying to prove myself, professionally, on the job. But, this personal story about how Black African American men feel about Black women and their hairstyles is complex for a lot of reasons, IMO, but ‘shaming’ Black women is definitely not the answer. All this type of PUBLIC Black-on-Black self-demeaning attacks only resulted in SAGGIN PANTS styles and etc that we have as part of our cultural definition today which means we are being conditioned to define our culture in extreme behaviors including excessive wearing of hair weaves and extensions and etc. but these extreme behaviors are not ours! As I have said before, White women wear hair extensions and weaves at the same rate that Black women do and white society have their extreme styles too, however, they come behind a movement furthered by Blacks and so, their social behaviors are not targeted. Black people become the trend setters and the 'fall guy' for promoting whatever it is, good or bad, in the world. White men do not attack White women publicly for issues that they may view as detrimental at the same rate the Black men do because it is not the right thing to do. Period. If Black men cannot find a way to address the issues that they feel are bad for Black women by encouragement then, let someone else do it.

 

There is another example based on an old movie that I had just saw recently. The Black man in this film, IMO, is so gorgeous, like WOW! Mind blowing. In the movie, Phatgirlz, he tells the character played by Monique [paraphrasing] that she should not use certain explicative words and phrases to address other women because it takes away from her glory. Now, that is what I define as encouraging.

 

In this world today as it has been in the past, we are always going to have this existing alongside of our cultures:

 

RAHOTEP & NOFRET in Ancient Africa

800px-%C3%84gyptisches_Museum_Kairo_2016 

By Djehouty - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=51203600

Rahotep & Nofret 2600s BC;

Nofret is wearing a wig, her real hair, bangs, can be seen under the wig.

 

800px-%C3%84gyptisches_Museum_Kairo_2016

By Djehouty - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0,

https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=51268686

 

So therefore, to just ‘shame’ Black women for wearing wigs and false hair enhancements in an environment whereby White women like this ancient White woman, NOFRET, who existed in ancient Black African civilization about 2600 BC is given ‘a pass’ to do this, is wrong. There needs to be a better way to address the issue of Black women who do go to the extreme though in wanting to portray White traits due to Self-Hatred.

 

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O black woman, do you know who you are? It is you for whom the birds sing when the dawn opens itself for inspection. It is the glow in your eyes that the stars imitate when they sparkle. It is the color of your flava that makes the rainbow dull in comparison, and it is via your beauty that we can physically witness God’s artistry.-Gibran-
• 

O black woman, do you know who you are? You are the secret that only reveals itself when a man is truly ready to experience the joy of having his dream transformed into reality. You are God’s private blessing to men who know what to do within the point between birth and death. To dwell within the kingdom of YOU is where heaven begins. -Gibran- 
• 

O black woman, do you know who you are? You are both the starting point and the finish line for everything I could ever aspire to be. You are a force of nature that has broken my shackles so that I can walk freely. You have erased my doubts so that I can think clearly. You have repaired my broken wings so that I can soar beside you. -Gibran- 
• 

O black woman, do you know who you are? You are the magic that awes the universe, the splendor that amazes the earth, and the glory that makes men heart beat with pride when they attempt to possess u. -Gibran- 
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O black woman, do you know who you are? You are the beautiful gift that God left on the doorstep of my heart. You are that special moment in time when nothing else matters but most importantly, you are YOU! Unmistakably YOU! -Gibran- 
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O black woman, do you know who you are? You are the sunshine that lights my life from within. You are the fire that warms every fiber of my being and that illuminates my path so that I am never afraid of the darkness. -Gibran- 
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O black woman, did u know that when I stare in the skies the stars spell your name? I feel your touch in the wind and I see your face in the clouds. And when I stand under the shadow of your smile, I find shelter from the storm. -Gibran- 
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O black woman, do you know who you are? You are that warm safe place where all roads lead at the end of a day when I have slayed all my dragons and find that all of my strength comes from you. You melt on my life and I become complete. -Gibran- 
• 

O black woman, do you know who u are? You are chocolate, dipped in mystery, a specially-designed flava whose smile is brighter than the rainbow. -Gibran-

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@Chevdove

Yes, I believe that the popularity of weaves and wigs in the black community are a crime. As far as ancient egypt goes, I don't really give it much power. But it is ours and we must recognize that and always remember what we have accomplished.

 

We should not disrespect each other. In the story you presented, I feel the black gentleman was out of place by telling you he didn't like your hair. I would never tell a queen that I don't like her hair. I simply would ignore it. His tactic was ineffective and weak. He later had to correct his poor behavior by telling you that he liked your hair, which may have been against his agenda. Nothing positive comes from negative behavior. If he had not said anything to you about your hair, he would not have had to correct himself later.

 

He should have ignored all the flattery you got from Indian, White and other non-black men and expected them to embrace black women more when black women cover up their true beauty and disguise their appearance to look more like them. As for the black men, they were not empowered and have adapted the same ideologies as those who oppose us in our natural state. If these men were truly empowered they should have protested the white supremacy behavior and not gave in to the social construct. The fact that it took you to disguise your appearance for them to compliment you is a prime example of how white supremacy works in my humble opinion. You were rewarded with compliments for adapting to a beauty that is inferior to your own.

 

I would never tell a queen that her appearance is inadequate. I just don't give poor judgement any power or relevance. It's less about appearance for me and more about thinking. But it would have been an opportunity and pleasure for me to compliment you when you wore your hair naturally. You would have received no feedback for wearing weave or a wig from me.

 

We have many issues in the black community. How we perceive beauty is one issue. The fact that our kids choose white dolls over black dolls is an example of how inferior we are socially. Yet, even though the evidence is there that we suffer from self hate, parents still raise their children to embrace beauty standards they were not meant to embrace. We teach our kids to hate themselves and adopt European beauty standards. Yes, crime is a problem. But if a child is taught to hate themselves, what behavior might they possess? Might they be compelled more easily to kill each other and value their own lives less while they go out of their way not to harm anyone else who doesn't look like them? For instance, there are videos on YouTube of black gang members hanging out with white supremacists and embracing the general lee flag. It's not surprising to me at all.

 

And since their views about their own culture and appearance are skewed, might they adopt other weird behavior as well, such as sagging their pants and showing their cracks to the world? Our behavior is linked. I believe that once black people learn to appreciate their own true beauty, then that will uproot the circumstances of black people across the globe.

 

@Cynique

Old enough to know better than to answer that question. lol

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@NubianFellow  You  repeatedly stress how blacks were uprooted from their African roots. To this day they are still America's step children. Everything that you are claiming and advocating about black hair is nothing new.  It has been a subject of discussion for at least a century. Back in the 1960s, a "black is beautiful" craze swept the country and Afros were in.   But gradually things leveled off and what black women did with their hair split out. So, why was black brainwashing unable to permanently uproot white brain washing when it came to hair?  Possibly because that ol adage about "when in Rome, do as the Romans do" permeated the subconscious minds of black women who are aware that their hair is a manifestation of their past. But, perhaps because the past is so depressing, they want to live in the present where they can exercise their freedom to wear their hair any way they choose. Yeah, i know we are supposed to learn from the past. But maybe that's what the lesson is.   And I wouldn't bet on little black girls not choosing a Nikki Minaj doll over a Lady GaGa one or a Michelle Obama picture over a Melania Trump one in today's America.   Give it rest, handsome.  (why did you delete your video?) You also have choices, and there are plenty of bushy-haired sistas out there, ready to rock your world!  😉

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@Cynique ❤️ Thank you very much for the compliment queen. I took it down because the video wasn't related to the discussion. I did want to show that I am a real black man who is very passionate about the views I express. These types of discussions are necessary to have and I think it's good that we can agree and disagree with each other.

 

There is still a strong black pride movement and black hair movement. These ideas are catching on in other parts of the world. This is how powerful we are as a people. We influence billions of other black people from all around the planet. That's why I am betting on Africans who are from America to wake up first. I believe that once we get our acts together, others will follow our lead as they have been doing since we were kidnapped and bought over here as prisoners of war.

 

Black people have never had the opportunity to brainwash each other, only resist brainwashing that was done to us. We have never controlled any of these forms of power in this country and we still don't control any of it. And once a black business acquires too much influence and power, they disappear or sell out.

 

The idea of white supremacy is so powerful that in Africa they face the same low self esteem and need for validation that our people face over here. Even places like Nigeria where they validate weaves, wigs and skin lightening creams. Black people on this planet are actually sacrificing the ability to walk around in and enjoy the sun so they can watch their white bleached skin decay in the dark shade. These people have many views that defend their behavior. They will tell us it's a fashion statement and nothing is wrong. But something is wrong with this line of thinking.

 

I have seen videos of black women who take off their weaves and show their gorgeous, long, black textured hair underneath the stupid looking weaves and by the time they get rid of the bugs, lice and dandruff, it is amazing that they wanted to cover their hair up in the first place. It's indeed a sickness. I believe that we are sick and we need help. We have all been through so much and as a collective. We are not well. We may never get well, but our kids deserve to. I think that's where the focus needs to be at. That's who I believe deserves to be empowered the most. We need to reach our kids before anyone ever has a chance to corrupt them. That may be the only way to fix all of this.

 

 

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On 1/28/2019 at 5:08 PM, Cynique said:

To me, it's a superficial affectation.  I prefer to debate white folks when it comes to black grievances, not parade around showing off my frizzy tresses expecting them to be be filled with respect.  And , yes, rejecting natural hair is, indeed, about going with the flow - of manageable hair as opposed battling unruly kinks.

 

Let the church say AMEN!!!  :)

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 @Troy I love the Afro on her! Very pretty! I also enjoyed reading the article.

 

The truth is, I don't think there is anything laughable about our hair in its natural state. I don't feel that just because we are wearing our hair natural means we have something to prove. I believe the opposite. When we reject our natural hair and embrace hair that is not ours, then we probably have something more to prove. And I get it. Black people don't own enough black businesses. What this means is that in order for many of us to get ahead in a corporate or office atmosphere, it may be more safe to wear a weave or a wig because like back in slavery, unless black people modify themselves, then us just being who we are can be deemed very offensive. Isn't that why they shoot us like wild animals? Funny thing is we can't win either way (or maybe that's the not-so-funny thing).

 

But in our neighborhoods and schools, it's become social suicide for black women to embrace their natural hair. They get teased by their peers and called racist names, only instead of by white people,  by other black people now. It appears that we have socially graduated to mirror a supremacist way of thinking. Self-hatred has been engineered into our culture, subtly.

 

Time and time again I have witnessed young black women wear ugly, stupid looking weaves cover up their own hair which was actually gorgeous and long underneath. It's not like a lot of these women who wear hair hats can't grow their own hair naturally. They call it protective hair styling but I have seen far more damage done to their unattended natural hair due to wearing weaves and wigs. Women who do not wear "protective hairstyles" don't seem to have the same problems as those who do - which is why they are not actually protective hairstyles at all. For them to be protective, they would have to actually protect the hair. Yet, all too many times, we have seen interesting things underneath these "protective hairstyles." Of course, many women who wear weaves still attend to their natural hair underneath it all, but that doesn't justify them wanting to hide it.

 

I think it's time to delve into what this discussion is actually about. No sense in dancing around it any more. If we don't understand what "supremacy" is then discussions about empowerment will not go anywhere.

 

"The state or condition of being superior to all others in authority, power, or status."

 

If a man waltzed into a society of people who looked nothing like them and they were convinced that he was the standard of beauty they should possess, then that would be an example of how supremacy works. When people are convinced that they are inadequate in some way as it relates to someone else, then that is supremacy. But supremacy cannot exist without inferiority.

 

In order for white supremacy to exist, there has to be cooperation from the people who are subjected to it. Without this cooperation, supremacy won't be able to exist since it is based on behavior and thinking.

 

I do believe that the energy and focus needs to go on our children. The adult's views and reasoning is not likely to change, regardless of any evidence shared of why this behavior is a reflection in the black community of how well white people have dominated us and have controlled our thinking and behavior.

 

We assumed that slavery ended, but in reality we understand that the system or the idea behind slavery has not ended at all. Neither has the mentality of our people that have endured the psychological and systemic after-effects of chattel slavery.

 

Today, many of our problems are due to how we think. Once that behavior changes, then there will be hope for us.

 

 

 

 

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On 1/31/2019 at 5:23 PM, NubianFellow said:

He should have ignored all the flattery you got from Indian, White and other non-black men and expected them to embrace black women more when black women cover up their true beauty and disguise their appearance to look more like them.

@NubianFellow At this time of my life, as I already said, I had already been validated before I ever wore braid extensions, so, there is no way that Black men would be in good standing when men of other cultures acknowledge the beauty of women of any race/culture. They would look pretty stupid in the eyes of other men, if they ignored women of their own culture, should they style their hair naturally or with wigs or extensions in this world. No one, no men, ignores women just because they wear hair extensiosn in this world. That does not make any sense. 

 

On 1/31/2019 at 5:23 PM, NubianFellow said:

when black women cover up their true beauty and disguise their appearance to look more like them.

 

I acknowledge that you believe that I 'disguised my appearance to look more non-African'. This is what you believe--in that Black women wear wigs and hair extensions to look non-African. I clearly stated that I wore 'BRAIDS'--this is not a non-White hair style. But, unfortunately, you are blocking this out. 

 

Also, I was employed due to my interview byway of my supervisor and that Cherokee Indian and the other White men--when I wore my natural hair!  

 

On 1/31/2019 at 5:23 PM, NubianFellow said:

If these men were truly empowered they should have protested the white supremacy behavior and not gave in to the social construct.

 

Have you ever considered the fact that Black women are now being acknowledged for their presence, their unique presence and unique beauty, by people, both men and women, of other cultures due to the ancient Black civilization being overthrown, and due to the intense oppressions being meted out to Black women and children! Don't you realize that the freedom of expression Black women are doing today, stems from this basis? Whether we wear our hair naturally or with enhancements, is what women do all over the world, however, Black men have oppressed Black women, while giving other kinds of women 'a pass' for doing the same thing. But now, we are being set free to work out our own place in this world and, thankfully, there are so many other Black men and are giving us this support and acknowledgement that we deserve. The White Supremacy that you are addressing was eclipsed that day, for me, in the office, thanks to other men in that shipyard, both White and BLack!

 

On 1/31/2019 at 5:23 PM, NubianFellow said:

The fact that it took you to disguise your appearance for them to compliment you is a prime example of how white supremacy works in my humble opinion.

 

You are repeating yourself, so perhaps I will answer in this mode;

 

It was in my natural hairstyle that I got the job! LOL. Because I wanted to keep my natural hair, I chose to braid it and add extensions. Braiding natural hair and working my job in that capacity, would have rendered me the same results of not being able to manage my hair during the week, but braid extensions holds the style much longer.

 

On 1/31/2019 at 5:23 PM, NubianFellow said:

You were rewarded with compliments for adapting to a beauty that is inferior to your own.

 

Braids is NOT of the White culture. 

 

On 1/31/2019 at 5:23 PM, NubianFellow said:

But it would have been an opportunity and pleasure for me to compliment you when you wore your hair naturally.

 

Thank you.

 

On 1/31/2019 at 5:23 PM, NubianFellow said:

You would have received no feedback for wearing weave or a wig from me.

 

But, that is why, we are here today, in a multi-cultural world. The standards that Black women were too oppressive, by ancient BLack men, and this was not normal, so here we are today...

 

Seriously, I don't think it would be good for Black women to be ignored, but, it doesn't matter, because no matter what, there will always be someone else, other men, that will acknowledge the natural beauty, inside and out, of all women. Black women have taken a serious hit, a hit that goes way back in time, and many of us are strong enough to make the effort to present ourselves in society in a positive light. And, whether Black women choose to wear their natural hair, straight hair, natural hair extensions or etc., they deserve the opportunity that they have been given to work it out. I applaud this effort all the time. I would never knock a sista down if she chooses to wear a certain hairstyle. Never.  But, NubianFellow, I understand how some men perceive this, and hopefully, they will stop being exploited too, to knock a sista down, because I don't believe that kind of 'shaming' will work...Thanks to other men, both BLack and non-Black that can acknowledge the efforts of women of all walks of life for their efforts to present themselves in a positive aspect in this world. 

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11 hours ago, Troy said:

this article, written by @Cynique almost 1/2 century ago may give you some perspective 

 

GET OUTTA HERE!!! That's @Cynique!!! I knew it! The way she writes! I just knew she was professional! Her afro is tight!!! 

 

 

5 hours ago, Mel Hopkins said:
On 1/28/2019 at 5:08 PM, Cynique said:

To me, it's a superficial affectation.  I prefer to debate white folks when it comes to black grievances, not parade around showing off my frizzy tresses expecting them to be be filled with respect.  And , yes, rejecting natural hair is, indeed, about going with the flow - of manageable hair as opposed battling unruly kinks.

MEL HOPKINS:

Let the church say AMEN!!!

@Mel Hopkins AMEN!!! 

 

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@Chevdove

Quote

I impulsively decided to braid my hair and added extensions over the weekend.

At least braids are not imitating anyone else. If you wore braid extensions then I don't see what the problem was.

 

I feel that when black women wear hair that is not native to their appearance, they are indeed disguising their hair. If a sista feels the need to wear an Afro wig or black textured weave like braids, I do not have a problem with that.

 

Other women don't get a pass. They simply don't count.

 

29 minutes ago, Chevdove said:

Whether we wear our hair naturally or with enhancements

And I believe that this is what we truly disagree about. Weaves and wigs are not enhancements. They are not enhancements when clowns wear them and they are not enhancements when black women wear them either. The natural hair is the enhancement. It's just too bad that enough black women don't realize that.

 

And for the record, sistas aren't wearing Afro's to parade them around white people. The sistas who wear their hair natural are doing it because they value their natural hair.

 

1 hour ago, Chevdove said:

No one, no men, ignores women just because they wear hair extensions in this world. That does not make any sense. 

It makes plenty of sense sista! If black women wear hairstyles to attract black men, then black men have a duty show black women that we appreciate them as they are. Black women were made specifically for black men. It's not a natural occurrence for black men to reject the natural supreme beauty of black women.

 

1 hour ago, Chevdove said:

Black men have oppressed Black women

I don't believe that black men have oppressed black women by not wanting them to wear weaves. I also believe that if black men started to wear wigs or weaves that looked like Brad Pit hairstyles, black women would not be oppressing black men if they protested. But I am pretty comfortable in saying that I don't think black women would like that and I can only hope that I am correct by assuming this.

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9 hours ago, NubianFellow said:

At least braids are not imitating anyone else. If you wore braid extensions then I don't see what the problem was.

 

 

@NubianFellow Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!

 

9 hours ago, NubianFellow said:

I feel that when black women wear hair that is not native to their appearance, they are indeed disguising their hair. If a sista feels the need to wear an Afro wig or black textured weave like braids, I do not have a problem with that.

 

You know, I think that this was the problem: Here's another point about the married man 'Black-Sam' that first made that comment that morning: He had a picture of his wife on his desk. And guess what!? She was Black African AMerican, and her hair was a short, hot-combed, pressed straight hair style. My natural hair was never straight, hot-combed. I blow dried it, a BLOW-OUT--so it was very full. So Black-Sam was actually upset with me, because I didn't wear my hair, STRAIGHT! Can you believe that!? I believe he was offended due to my ethnic hairstyle. But, like you, most Black men always complimented me when I styled my hair natural. 

 

But, when I was younger, my Mom did give my sisters and I, chemical relaxers, and I continued for awhile and, completely butchered my hair. But during college, I completely stopped at some point, and went natural. And, never went back to those past days.

 

10 hours ago, NubianFellow said:

The natural hair is the enhancement. It's just too bad that enough black women don't realize that.

 

 

I agree.

 

10 hours ago, NubianFellow said:

It makes plenty of sense sista! If black women wear hairstyles to attract black men, then black men have a duty show black women that we appreciate them as they are. Black women were made specifically for black men. It's not a natural occurrence for black men to reject the natural supreme beauty of black women.

 

I love this statement. And, I agree, but again, due to the past in how Black women have been so beaten down about their natural beauty, as you did write about, some have decided to wear straight hair styles. I don't like it for me, but I understand. Some black women look so gorgeous though, no matter how they style their hair.

 

 

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Nubian

Cynique asked you how old you are and you declined to give an age, but based on how intelligent you seem but how much you're still trying to convince these women to see things a certain way.....I'm guessing you're in your mid-30s, lol.
Man, you can type paragraph after paragraph and page after page explaining yourself and STILL find be misunderstood on this subject for 2 major reasons:

1. Most men and women just think differently, especially when it comes to social subjects and they will NEVER see things your way no matter how well you articulate it.

2. Most AfroAmerican women today aren't as concerned about Afrocentric ideology as most AfroAmerican men are because they don't see white supremacy as the problem, they see BLACK MASCULINITY as the problem.
Now if you think I'm lying or in error-  as much as you've repeatedly called them "sista" how many times have they refered to you as "brother"?


 

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1 minute ago, Pioneer1 said:

2. Most AfroAmerican women today aren't as concerned about Afrocentric ideology as most AfroAmerican men are because they don't see white supremacy as the problem, they see BLACK MASCULINITY as the problem.

If you think I'm lying or in error....as much as you've repeatedly called them "sista", how many times have they refered to you as "brother"?

 

@Pioneer1 That is not true! 

 

Both Cynque and I have agree with this "brother" on some valid points!

10 hours ago, NubianFellow said:

. I also believe that if black men started to wear wigs or weaves that looked like Brad Pit hairstyles, black women would not be oppressing black men if they protested.

 

@NubianFellow LOL! This if funny but, when you flip it, like this, I can see your point. 

10 hours ago, NubianFellow said:

But I am pretty comfortable in saying that I don't think black women would like that and I can only hope that I am correct by assuming this.

 

LOL. true!!! 

 

10 hours ago, NubianFellow said:

I don't believe that black men have oppressed black women by not wanting them to wear weaves

 

But yes, it can be oppressive, and in certain cases, it is. As I said before, unlike you, who care, some Black men are 'white washed' or brain washed too, and they attack Black women for the wrong reasons. 

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Chev

Perhaps "not finding agreement" isn't the best term to use, but not seeing eye to eye would be a better term.
I'm not saying that you or Cynique see him as an enemy, I'm just saying that most conscious Black men assume most intelligent Black women will naturally ally with them and agree with them on certain issues when Afrocentricism is often the furthest thing from their mind and Black empowermen isn't one of their goals. 

 

 

 


Racial politics, and politics in general is mostly a masculine thing because it involves a territorial mindset that MOST (though certainly not all) women will never understand so they can't relate to why a conscious man would EXPECT certain behavior and thinking from them.
The average mentality among most of our women is:

 

 

Image result for Black woman blonde highlights

"What's wrong with ME putting blonde highlights in MY hair if that's what I want to do?
Don't I have a right to do with MY hair what I want?????"

 

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On 2/3/2019 at 1:14 PM, Troy said:

ianFellow this article, written by @Cynique almost 1/2 century ago may give you some perspective

What perspective is this?  That i agreed with Nubian fellow, until i didn't agree with him?  LOL 🙃

12 hours ago, Chevdove said:

GET OUTTA HERE!!! That's @Cynique!!! I knew it! The way she writes! I just knew she was professional! Her afro is tight!!! 

Actually i never earned a living as a writer.   i was kind of a part-time free-lancer. After i retired from my day job shuffling papers as a postal clerk,  i did self-publish 4 paperbacks -  that never went anywhere.

@NubianFellow  If a black  woman successfully survives/excels in a white society without wearing her hair natural, what other validation does she need?  Hair in its natural state is not some magical halo that inspires and guarantees pride.  That idea has to be instilled in a black female because it's not something she is born thinking. Since black hair is of no importance in the dominant white society, its appearance is irrelevant. You are romanticizing the significance of hair as something other than an "appendage" -  like fingernails. A woman is not obligated to comply with male approval and she is free to do whatever she want to with her hair.  Your believing otherwise doesn't matter since you are not an arbitrator.  If she has her "coochie"  waxed, so damned what?  It's what's inside that counts.    

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1 hour ago, Pioneer1 said:

they don't see white supremacy as the problem, they see BLACK MASCULINITY as the problem.

 

Damn @Pioneer1, that is a thought provoking statement. Indeed, any perceived problems with Black masculinity is usually a function of white racism.

 

1 hour ago, Chevdove said:

I also believe that if black men started to wear wigs or weaves that looked like Brad Pit hairstyles, black women would not be oppressing black men if they protested.

 

Can you imagine dudes straightening their hair, dying it Blonde, and styling it the way Brad Pitt does?! How would it sound if these Brothers defended the practice saying it was easier to maintain or that Black women have no place commenting on the how men style their hair.

 

Suppose Black women preffered this look and more brothers started adopting the style. In this scenario it would be pretty obvious we are striving for and preferring a European stardard of beauty.

 

However if Black women do this a Black man better not say shit about it being about rejecting naural hair in favor of adopting a white standard....  instead the problem is the Black man -- not the impact of centuries of white racism.

 

@Delano sharpton claims he adopted the style to play homage to Brown.  Neither dyed there hair blonde. I'd give entertainers a bit more lattitude in how they present themselves... very few Brothers are interested in mimicking Al Sharpton's hairdo.

 

1 hour ago, Cynique said:

It's what's inside that counts.    

 

Of course this is true, but obviously we a particularly shallow culture. Women (not just black women) and their hair is perhaps the pinnacle of this. Black women, typically take FAR better care of their hair than the do their bodies. They invest far more time and money in their hair than their education -- am I lying? Go to any impoverished neighborhood and what business do you see thriving?

 

This is energy is entirely unnecessary to attract a man. Big businesses are the only beneficiaries.

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4 minutes ago, Troy said:

his is energy is entirely unnecessary to attract a man. Big businesses are the only beneficiaries.

How do you know black women style their hair to attract men? They are just as likely to style their hair because that's what all the other women are doing.     

 

9 minutes ago, Troy said:

They invest far more time and money in their hair than their education -- am I lying?

Maybe.There are millions  of black female college graduates who don't spend more money on their hair than their education.  

 

Everybody has their own theory about the relationship black women have with their hair.  I don't place a lot of credibility in men's opinion on this subject.  

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32 minutes ago, Cynique said:

How do you know black women style their hair to attract men?

 

I was not asserting that.  I was saying it is not necessary. However the notion that some women style their hair in a manner they believe men would find appealing is not exactly absurd.  Wouldn't you agree @Cynique?

 

32 minutes ago, Cynique said:

There are millions  of black female college graduates who don't spend more money on their hair than their education.  

 

Of course there are and given the escalating cost of college that might seem reasonable.  The reality however is less than 10 percent of Black women are currently enrolled in college.  

 

28 minutes ago, Delano said:

Did their James Brown's and Al Sharpton's hairstyle negatively effect their message or their image?

 

@Delano I dunno.  From a personal perspective I judged Brown on his music which for the most part I enjoy -- again I give entertaining a lot of leeway in how they present themselves.    When Al first rose to prominence his hair style, obesity, and jogging suit, was definitely a negative in my book... he was a mess.  What do you think Del?

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Sorry  @Delano I meant what do you think about the general public's reaction to Al Sharpton's hairdo -- before he dropped all that weight and swapped out the jogging suits for the expensive tailor made suits?

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No, I don't watch TV broadcast TV, but that does not surprise me -- he is popular enough to do that.

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8 hours ago, Cynique said:

Hair in its natural state is not some magical halo that inspires and guarantees pride. 

I so disagree with you here sista! Every cultural action should guarantee self-pride. Of course, some women wear their hair natural and prefer white or non-black men. Some of these women still deal with self-hate issues. These issues won't disappear simply because black women throw away their hair hats. Funny thing, is I believe that's a necessary step to even start getting to the point where we deal with more pressing issues that concern us. All the things that hold us back collectively are all linked together. To cure us of our sickness, we need to tackle all of these social issues head on!

 

8 hours ago, Cynique said:

Since black hair is of no importance in the dominant white society, its appearance is irrelevant.

If we keep the focus on how we appear to "dominant" white society (which I don't really believe is so dominant) we start to lose ourselves. The focus should be how we appear in dominant black society. It should be about our influence on the Diaspora. It should be about how we influence our children. The thing we choose to make the most relevant (the most irrelevant as far as this particular topic is concerned), is the least important part of this conversation. Other than the negative impact on us and our children, they are not really apart of this conversation.

 

And trust me - they care. When I attended an all white school and wore my "Black woman is mother of the earth" tee shirts, I have to admit, most of my white peers paid my shirts no mind. However, within a few days, it was announced on the loud speaker about the tee shirt policy which said we couldn't wear tee shirts with writing on them. An unusual announcement but someone was complaining to someone and it became an issue. Well worth the trip to the principle's office when I ignored the announcement. Even the Arabs at my school got offended... lol. Sidenote: I secretly loved the fact that I was able to rile up so many people with a pro-black tee shirt.

 

Our issues are more relevant to white people than they will ever let on.

8 hours ago, Cynique said:

You are romanticizing the significance of hair as something other than an "appendage" -  like fingernails.

I think the idea of loving who we are is something to be romanticized. It's something to celebrate. We don't have the right to be ashamed of ourselves and pass inferior behavior down to our children.

 

 

8 hours ago, Cynique said:

 If she has her "coochie"  waxed, so damned what?  It's what's inside that counts

😂

6 hours ago, Cynique said:

I don't place a lot of credibility in men's opinion on this subject.

That makes as much sense to me as men not valuing how women feel about their presence. I have to believe that when women do their makeup and hair they may want to actually attract men. I also believe that if most black men expressed negativity about women's weaves and wigs, they wouldn't wear them - the same way that if women expressed a positive reaction to men wearing weaves and wigs they would trend overnight!

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Troy


Ofcourse they see Black masculinity as the problem because it competes with White masculinity which is the default Patriarchal system this society operates on and causes confusion in their minds over who they should be loyal to and put their trust in.

Which is why so many AfroAmerican women love and defend morally weak AfroAmerican men and gay AfroAmerican men; because neither pose a serious threat to the system of White dominance and they know their place and role as Black antagonists in a White system kind of like the fool or court jester knows his place in the King's palace.

And suggesting to Black women how to dress and how to present themselves is a sign of Black masculinity.

 

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Something I want to share in this discussion is a spoken word of me giving praise to all Black women. I believe this is an in-depth scope of how I perceive the Black woman as she relates to the Black man. Also, I don't aim to embarrass Black women or make them feel inadequate in any way. I aim to do the opposite of that. Though some of my views can be perceived as critical, I think they are warranted. End of the day, I feel that it is partly the Black man's obligation to make sure Black women don't feel inadequate and to make Black women understand they are appreciated -- as they are.

 

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@Pioneer1Sorry, i thought the response to my post on women was written by you.  Checking back, i see it was written by Nubian fellow and i deleted it.  I confess that i am not as much on my game any more due to my simply growing old. i get things mixed up  and i often don't make myself clear. So in this case,  it's not you i'm blowing off. It's Nubian fellow.  

@NubianFellow i can't say that your response to my post comes as a surprise. It would be asking too much if you tolerated black woman for being something other than your idealized image of them. You attribute their shortfall to being brain washed by white standards and your goal is apparently to make them over to embody the specifications necessary to earn respect and approval. A reflection of your assumption that you are the spokesman for black men - who also need a make-over, and you further want your indoctrination to begin with young black girls. It's all a part of your grand vision to Africanize Americans of color and you are tangled up in hair. But -  you are entitled to pursue your messianic mission.  Maybe you will succeed where others have failed,  First,  however, you gotta figure out what you're doing wrong... 

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