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NubianFellow

Black Women Are Beautiful Naturally

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2 hours ago, Mel Hopkins said:

 

@Pioneer1

 

If that's a sign of black masculinity - then that's quite damn sad.   

 

 

Indeed......
It IS sad if a member of the opposite sex has to pull a Black woman to the side and explain to her that putting blonde highlights in her hair and wearing worn-out spandex and flip flops (especially when you're 320 lbs) is an inappropriate look for the workplace.
You'd think another Black woman would pull her to the side and tell her this; rather than allowing her to make a public fool of herself so that SHE can look good by comparison.  But that's how many of our people do eachother.

 

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5 hours ago, Cynique said:

Meta-physics is my second favorite "science".

 

Mets-physics is another one that's way over my head! LOL.

5 hours ago, Cynique said:

Question for Chevdove.  What is the explanation for the wives of Cain and Abel?  Where did they come from?? Are they symbolic of something?  

 

Based on my research and understanding, Abel was not noted for having a wife, however when it comes to Cain, I think the wife mentioned and his son mentioned signifies that his older 'half-sister' [ie she was hybrid, meaning intersexed] was the wife that fathered his son. ANd the conflict that occurred between Cain and Abel [ie HEBEL] was about that wife. 

 

 If thou doest well, shalt thou not be accepted? and if thou doest not well, sin lieth at the door.

And unto thee shall be his desire, and thou shalt rule over him. GENESIS 4:7.

 

Based on my research, the 'Sin' that was hanging around both of the brothers was 'Shebelle', their older sister and their was strife between them over her. She introduced Cain to being 'a tiller of the ground', meaning both agriculture and Metalurgy... stone, pottery works, statues...

Cain became the 'ruler over that civilization. He contributed his Y-DNA to the eastern way of life.

Were there other people on earth at this time period, yes, but the reproduction was faulty up until the Black AFrica people became a part of the earth.

Shebelle, Cabel, and Hebel [ie Abel], Seth [ie Ethbel/Ethbaal] -- the beginning of Bel worship & Baal worship 

 

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Whoa stop the presses. How did I let this one slip by…

 

12 hours ago, Chevdove said:

I've read about the past where 'someone' walked through a wall, so I know that 

quantum physics is real

 

@Chevdove, see, most people would doubt, that someone walked through a wall.  There has to be some modicum of skepticism when you read something as extreme as this -- otherwise you are liable to fall for anything. 

 

Also, nothing in quantum theory suggests that people should be able to walk through walls.

 

6 hours ago, Cynique said:

And it has also demonstrated how an object can be two places at once.

 

I know you did not say this, but just in case, keep in mind these "objects" are sub-atomic particles electrons, photos, and the like.  Objects, like people, do not behave the way electrons do.  The locations of people are not based upon a probability function.

 

9 hours ago, Pioneer1 said:

Blacks = billions of years old or older

 

@Pioneer1 how can Black people have been around for billions of years when the planet has been capable of supporting human life for far less time? Do you believe Black people are extraterrestrial?

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Troy
 

how can Black people have been around for billions of years when the planet has been capable of supporting human life for far less time?
This is theory, not necessarily proven fact.
We must remember that just like a few centuries ago the West believed that man was ONLY 6,000 years old.....every generation of Western scientists seem to find more evidence of man being much older than previously believed.

 

Do you believe Black people are extraterrestrial?

Actually the opposite.....
I believe Black people not only come from this planet but are probably the most adapt for it.
How many Black people need sunscreen or shades to "protect" themselves from nature?

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@Pioneer1, so you believe your theory of Black people being billions of years old is more plausible?! Are you shitting me? You can't be serious?

 

The planet is only 4.5 billion years old, just a few billion years younger than the universe. 

 

2 hours ago, Pioneer1 said:

How many Black people need sunscreen or shades to "protect" themselves from nature?

 

That's a silly statement. Try living in the northern climates and see who is better adapted. Man adpats to their environment through randon mutation and natural selection. (btw. did you procreate, or have your genes been dropped from the gene pool through natural selection?)

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14 hours ago, Mel Hopkins said:

If that's a sign of black masculinity - then that's quite damn sad.   

@Mel Hopkins

Nothing is sad about black men who choose to speak on issues that affect us all. Gang violence needs to be spoken about. All forms of black media and what black people need to do to protect our image. Glorifying low vibrational behavior, and poor self esteem needs to be discussed properly.

 

Self esteem is a big issue in the black community and needs to be thoroughly addressed. This is how we have gotten rid of past low vibrational behavior and trends. Furthermore, our young queens need to understand that they are perfect for the black man as they are. They should understand that other women cannot compete with them as far as black men are concerned. A black man has to have standards. A black woman should appreciate a black man with standards. Some men don't care at all and I am certain that those men do not love black women as profoundly as those who express concern about issues pervasive in the black community such as the state of the black woman in America, among other pressing issues.

 

The issue of weave in the black community barely scratches the surface, yet the importance of addressing this behavior cannot be denied. Why? Because even though the conscious mind tells her that she is beautiful as she is and mother of the earth, we are not our conscious minds. What we do consciously is only a reflection of what we believe in our subconscious minds. The subconscious mind is who we actually are. We have been programmed and must be reprogrammed.

 

We can put the pro black fists up all day. We can embrace our history all we want. The subconscious mind has it's own program running and has already adapted to our reality. We are at its mercy. To successfully change the subconscious thinking, we have to change us!

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@Pioneer1 @NubianFellow  Talking about someone’s appearance makes $$$ millions for Wendy Williams and her talk show but that’s cheap entertainment. 

 

Nagging about another’s appearance,  which gay men have turned into an art form, is a weak and ineffective showing of black masculinity.  In fact, when I was growing up in Brooklyn - dudes called that a “bitch” move.  

 

An actual sign of Black masculinity would reflect first in a man having control over himself, and then working to better his physical environment.

And that’s the bare minimum. 

 

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@Mel Hopkins Let's be real sista. Black men being concerned with the state of black women is actually anti gay. Gay men could care less. I resided in Brooklyn right on Tompkins ave so I am familiar with the culture. The "bitch move" is allowing our sisters to go around embarrassing the black race and not caring. By this logic I suppose it would be equally "gay" behavior for black women to be concerned about black men sagging their pants. And why should they be concerned that statistically most of the boys they are raising are helping to exterminate black people? Business as usual in the black community? "Let's not be concerned about the state of our people and just let the self destruction continue and deflect as much as possible", could be the behavior of some. I bet they would say it has nothing to do with how anyone wears their hair because it's only fashion. And when a gang member gets a tear drop to celebrate they took a life, then maybe that's just fashion too.

 

Does anyone believe that black women wearing weave could be a direct reflection of why black women outnumber everyone else in terms of abortion? Self hate will always be self hate and cannot be defined any other way. That's why there are more Latinos in the USA now than black people. Between violent murders and abortions, we are probably killing more life than we produce at this point. Isn't the percentage of black people in the US 12 percent now? Wasn't it just 14 percent quite recently. But let's deflect and not concentrate on self hate issues we suffer in the black community.

 

Sleep is a beautiful thing and no one likes to be bothered while they slumber. The problem is, black people have been sleeping too long - to the point where the matter is so serious that at this point in time, it's wake up or face extinction, primarily by ourselves.

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1 hour ago, NubianFellow said:

Let's be real sista.

 

@NubianFellowReal is all I know - and talking about people, what they wear,  et al. is a sign of an inferior mind, lack of power and self-control.   As I stated (and this will be the last time); if that’s a sign of black masculinity today, then it’s in a state of disrepair. 

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15 hours ago, Troy said:

see, most people would doubt, that someone walked through a wall.  There has to be some modicum of skepticism when you read something as extreme as this -- otherwise you are liable to fall for anything. 

 

Also, nothing in quantum theory suggests that people should be able to walk through walls.

 

@Troy Based on the simple definition that I can grasp about 'Quantum physics, how can I be skeptic? 

 

The ancient word for 'science' was 'magic' simply because many people did not understand certain issues so, it the common people, it was magic, but to the MAGICIANS in the high courts of ancient civilizations, it was science. For example 'THE BURNING BUSH' well, to a common person they might use this as a basis to think that this is 'fantasy' but to me who understands that this directly correlates to our today's SATELLITES, TELEVISIONS and etc. that is so easy for me to understand.  But no, I do not understand how someone 'Jesus' could 'walk through a wall', sit down at the table of the disciples and then vanish, but I see this 'magic' on TV all of the time, so I don't see how I could be skeptic. I used to love to watch the sitcome 'BeWitched' and 'I Dream of Jeannie' in which a lot of this kind of camera 'MEDIUM' was used to show these 'magic phenomena'. Even though I don't understand how 'microwave ovens' came to be, this modern invention, this would be another example of why I can't be skeptic about someone 'walking through a wall'. So, I do wonder if this ancient writing has something to do with Quantum Physics, but 'skeptic', I am not. The way the story goes, is that earlier in the morning, he told Mary NOT to touch him yet, because he was not fully 'Resurrected' [what ever that means! lol] an then later, he walked through the wall and then vanished. That sounds like it might have something to do with Quantum PHysics, IMO. But one of the most interesting 'inventions' today that supposedly happened in the 1950s that also makes me think about this is THE REMOTE CONTROL. Does this have anything to do with Quantum PHysics, I wonder. 

 

6 hours ago, NubianFellow said:

They should understand that other women cannot compete with them as far as black men are concerned.

 

@NubianFellow But isn't this the very problem, in how many Black men have shown us otherwise? 

6 hours ago, NubianFellow said:

A black man has to have standards.

 

Again, this is the very problem. The standards that many Black men have had was NOT for us, the Black woman. It has become so common, it is joked about in so many films and sitcoms.

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1 hour ago, Mel Hopkins said:

talking about people, what they wear,  et al. is a sign of an inferior mind, lack of power and self-control

@Mel Hopkins I agree. If it's not constructive then it serves no purpose. Absolutely. I think we should welcome constructive criticism in the black community. I think that's the motivation we need for change sista.

 

@Chevdove Yes, that is part of the problem too. And that needs to be discussed too sista!

 

Regardless of hairstyle, black women are beautiful no matter what! Black women are the most beautiful women!

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Beauty, beauty beauty. Looks are superficial.  How often does it have to be prated that "beauty is in the eye of the beholder"! And who said that being natural is synonymous with beauty, anyway?  Nudity is natural, but we wear clothes that shield us and reflect our style as opposed to flaunting genitals and breasts and butts because these are things we are born with.  Furthermore, personality, intelligence and good character have more longevity than looks. What's really masculine is if a man is secure enough in his own identity that he can accept a woman vetting his looks the same way he vetts hers.  e.g. if a man tells a woman he doesn't like her weave or wig, he shouldn't get indignant  if she tells him she doesn't like his bushy beard and spiked tied-up hair.  

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I think @NubianFellow's example of Black men (and some women) sagging their pants is a good example. It would be entirely proper for a sister to step a youngin' and tell them to pull their damn pants up.

 

If no one checks the young Brother then there are no standards for dress and anything goes. Now some people believe there should be no standards -- as long as I'm not hurting you -- what difference does it make how anyone dresses?  I'm not one of those people.

 

I'm not saying I should make the rules, but there should be rules for behavior, including dress.  These rules can be different over time and place, but again there must be a certain level of accepted behavior for a civil society.

 

Saggin; pants if different that wearing a weave, for it speaks to slovenly dress and sometimes behavior.  I'm no longer inclined to care what a woman does with her hair as long as it is clean. Personally I think women invest FAR too much time and money in their hair. Black women's fixation on hair is not because of racism (thought it may have started that way) but skilled marketing, for white women are under the same pressure to have their hair look a certain way. It is part of American culture.

 

I've become friendly with a hair stylist recently and the stories she tells about white women and their hair would amaze you. 

 

I've recently taken up sporting a goatee.  I prefer to be clean shaven, but every woman I've gone out with says they like it, so I'm keeping it because it is relatively easy to maintain.  My ex-wife also preferred the goatee but I figured she should accept me without it.  I guess that is why we are no longer together 🙂

 

But to @Cynique's point looks are superficial. But I think most of us are "superficial" to a certain extent. I prefer women who are not obese, shorter than me, my complexion or darker, and a whole laundry list of physical characteristics -- some within the woman's control and others not. I don't think I'm shallow, I'm just a human being; this sort of thing is natural. 

 

Does my check list have to be 100% met - of course not.  The woman that meets all of my desired requirements does not exist. We make trade offs.

 

So when it comes to women's hair, I don't even care and more.  I know what I like and unless someone asks me, I keep my mouth shut.  There are far more important battles to fight in the war for Black liberation, like getting folk to support Black businesses.

 

 

 

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I feel like we are not ready to talk about weave and wigs as a problem. This generation of black women doesn't seem eager to have this conversation right now. In time, this may change, hopefully with a few more generations. I just hope that I am alive to see weaves and wigs go out of style. That is something I would like to witness in this reality. The good thing is that by black people not changing our behaviors, this probably won't make our situation any worst than it already is now.

 

Hey, I remember in school all the cool kids wore parachute pants. That was a big trend and when you told someone how dumb it was, you didn't know fashion. A few years later, we laugh at how ridiculous those fads were. At the end of the day, all black women are beautiful on the inside and outside and need to stop being ashamed of themselves because everyone else wants to copy the black woman's look and style. That may seem a little shallow for me to say but it is what it is. I also feel like they may not be hearing it enough. That could actually be part of the reason that weave is actually so popular right now.

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3 hours ago, NubianFellow said:

That was a big trend and when you told someone how dumb it was, you didn't know fashion

 

Yeah that reminds me of the Jherl Curl or the Mullet...

 

I see a lot more and more sistaz with purple hair including a couple i took out. Is purple hair really a thing, or am l i just a purple-hair-having-chick-magnet? 🙂

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43 minutes ago, Troy said:

l i just a purple-hair-having-chick-magnet

 

@Troy do you mean magnet, as in you’re attracted to women sporting purple hair?  

 

Now, that  IS an interesting turn of event.  😄  

 

But as my oldest daughter would say, “stop encouraging that behavior”.

 

 Just kidding.  

 

 It seems as if you’re getting an excellent education in black hair-dos.  Bravo 👏🏽👏🏽👏🏽

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No, @Mel Hopkins I meant i draw them. But technically the metal attract the magnet too, so my analogy was a bit off.

 

I was raised in an all female household and my own family was all female. still there is so much to kearn about women and hair 🙂

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Troy

I'm not sure what to tell you because after all I've said in this thread, for you to still ask me if I believed in the story of Adam and Eve makes me wonder if you're actually reading what I type or are even capable of understand what I've typed.
What good is giving you an answer that you can't understand?


 

 

 

Mel

 

Nagging about another’s appearance, which gay men have turned into an art form, is a weak and ineffective showing of black masculinity. In fact, when I was growing up in Brooklyn - dudes called that a "bitch" move.

 

Really?
If a man who tells his wife or woman how he wishes for her to dress in public is acting like a bitch, I pity the punk who is too scared to even do THAT and just keeps quiet....lol.

But I would have loved to see one of those "dudes" you speak of walk up to Muhammad Ali and tell HIM that he's making a bitch move for critizing the way some women dress....lol.

 

 

 

 

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@Pioneer1 this clip actually makes @Mel Hopkins's point. I agree no woman, or man, should worship at the alter of a European designer. 

 

However, any religion, or man exposing such a religion, that mandates chaste attire for women is oppressing women.

 

I've seen women in the ocean down here in burkas (or whatever you call that crazy getup some muslin women wear that covers everything but their eyes). Is that really what you in favor of?

 

Pioneer truth be told some of what you write is confusing and inconsistent. I recall previously you saying man was millions of years old. Now we are billions of years old. Which means we must be extraterrestrials because Earth could not support our form of life billions of years ago. When presented with this info you come if with something that some people believed centuries ago. 

 

Given your conversation with Chevdove about the Bible I figured you must be a Christian or some pioneerized version of one. I was curious to know which parts you believed.

 

 

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@Pioneer1 is that video clip the hill you want to die on? Lol.

 

OMG! Ali referred to African tribes as savages, his wife as merchandise, compared her to wild beast and praised the white man’s values!  OIL DIAMONDS and GOLD have no intrinsic value ...Europeans gave it its value and destroyed practically all of Africa to mine it!  

 

What is valuable is ALWAYS visible! Eat some fruit or vegetables, take a breath, get a sip of water!

 

Scratch “bitch” moves - Ali is an effing idiot  in this video clip. 

 

Further, women are humans.  We are free and belong to no man.  He may try to enslave us, torture us but he will never own a woman.  If anything, a woman controls a man’s fate. From conception, to when she gives him her mtDNA that houses ATP (aka the God Cell)  to his birth; a woman controls whether he will exist.  full stop.

 

If she’s crafty enough she can end him when he’s born and many women have done just that.  

 

Edit:   I will never understand the lunacy of a man claiming he is god when he and all men arrive on this planet the same way - though the crack of a woman’s ass. 

 

So what is this talk of ownership? 

 

 A man may make laws or use religion to control a woman’s behavior but let’s not ever get it twisted - man-made laws will NEVER trump Nature.  The speciation of the X chromosome is why humans exist in this form. 

 

I always thought Ali was a wise man - but in this clip, it is clear, he’s fully indocrinated as a white supremacist.   Damn.

 

For Ali to sit there and talk like that indicates he was brainwashed to the highest degree ... damn I’m embarrased to have seen this clip.! What’sn worse is to have his white host defend African tribes  against Ali’s ignorance. 

Edited by Mel Hopkins
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On 2/14/2019 at 11:17 PM, Mel Hopkins said:

 In fact, when I was growing up in Brooklyn - dudes called that a “bitch” move

👀 

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Troy

 

Given your conversation with Chevdove about the Bible I figured you must be a Christian or some pioneerized version of one. I was curious to know which parts you believed.

 

And this statement supports my previous post about you being unwilling or incapable of understanding my positions on history and religion.  You keep trying to put me in a box instead of taking my statements as they are.

 

 

 

 

Mel


I always thought Ali was a wise man - but in this clip, it is clear, he’s fully indocrinated as a white supremacist. Damn.


Mel you're a smart woman who says many things I agree with but honestly, is a woman such as yourself with a HISTORY of falling inlove with and marrying White men even qualified to accuse Muhammad Ali or any other Black man of being "indoctrinated with White supremacy" ???
 

You chose to fall inlove with and commit yourself to the very AGENT of White Supremacy itself;  so your motives for criticism of Black men like Ali can't be trusted.

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i don't know what Mel's response to Pioneer will be when it comes to her ex-husband,  but she sure got it right in her assessment of that loud mouth hypocrite Ali, whose choices of women were always examples of those consistent with western standards, - always bragging about them having long pretty hair which was anything but kinky. He also  regularly referred to joe Fraizer as a monkey. In his heyday he was typical of misogynisitic chauvinistic men of islam, expecting their women to be totally subservient and obedient to their dumb asses, but in his final years, Ali was a helpless cripple at the mercy of his controlling manipulative 4th wife. Poetic justice. Always the defender of Islam and its shady leaders, one can't help but wonder why Pioneer never became a Black Muslim.  They exemplify everything he believes in.  

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15 minutes ago, Cynique said:

i don't know what Mel's response to Pioneer will be when it comes to her ex-husband,  but she sure got it right in her assessment of that loud mouth hypocrite Ali, whose choices of women were always examples of those consistent with western standards, - always bragging about them having long pretty hair which was anything but kinky. He also  regularly referred to joe Fraizer as a monkey. In his heyday he was typical of misogynisitic chauvinistic men of islam, expecting their women to be totally subservient and obedient to their dumb asses, but in his final years, Ali was a helpless cripple at the mercy of his controlling manipulative 4th wife. Poetic justice. Always the defender of Islam and its shady leaders, one can't help but wonder why Pioneer never became a Black Muslim.  They exemplify everything he believes in.  


1. I'm not a defender of Islam.
I'm not a defender of ANY organized religion.....but I recognize truth where ever it is found whether in religion, philosophy, or personal observation.

2. I'm not a defender of Muhammad Ali's comments or behavior and how he talked about other Black people, called them gorillas in Manila, or called Africans savage.  That video was offered as a response to Mel's suggesting that a man who is focused on or criticizes a woman's appearance was some how weak or neglectful in his duties. 
I'm at work right now but if I had time I could probably dig up a clip of Malcolm X (whom you both had positive things to say about) criticizing the dress of Black women as well.

 

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35 minutes ago, Pioneer1 said:

'm not a defender of ANY organized religion.....but I recognize truth where ever it is found whether in religion, philosophy, or personal observation.

Do you?  Ali's sentiments about how woman should dress are only true in your view, a view which is no more valid than any other.  

35 minutes ago, Pioneer1 said:

I'm at work right now but if I had time I could probably dig up a clip of Malcolm X (whom you both had positive things to say about) criticizing the dress of Black women as well.

So what? i could dig up posts where i said that people think they can shut down an "opponent" by making reference to something either Malcolm or MLK said, - both of whom said things that time proved wrong.  i've always said my regard  for Malcolm was limited to the frustrated reaction he could evoke in white  folks. 

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2 hours ago, Pioneer1 said:

Mel you're a smart woman who says many things I agree with but honestly, is a woman such as yourself with a HISTORY of falling inlove with and marrying White men even qualified to accuse Muhammad Ali or any other Black man of being "indoctrinated with White supremacy" ???
 

You chose to fall inlove with and commit yourself to the very AGENT of White Supremacy itself;  so your motives for criticism of Black men like Ali can't be trusted.

 

@Pioneer1 History, Huh? Lol! 

 

My history is filled with black men. My father was black. My first born daughter’s father is black.   I know black men well enough to write a book and I’ve written two! 

 

BUT critiiquing black men is not my job.  

Ali played himself in that video clip.  He was a straight embarrassment. 

 

Now let me help you out here with MY history.  

 

I’ve only had 1 marriage. 

 

I married 1 blond hair blue-eyed french /german white man who to this day still loves this dark-skinned kinky-hair black woman and the ground she walks on.  

 

And he ain’t soft like you like to think about white men.  You can’t roll with me and be soft.  

 

He would kick anyone’s ass who would dare to step to me , his black stepdaughter (yes he stepped up and raised her like his own) and African/european descent daughters... no matter what they or I wear.  And trust, no one dictates what we wear or what we do ... and he’d still defend and protect us for exercising our rights.   But then again he’s white in America so maybe that’s privilege lol. 

 

Even though we’re no longer married I considered myself lucky for choosing this strong white man as partner.

He is the kindest man I know. Ironically,  he never tried to control me or the girls...but I guess there was no need. 

 

So no, I didn’t choose white supremacy; I chose freedom -and what resulted is a white man who worships us black women...daughters of Africa, with all the respect due us.  

 

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18 hours ago, Mel Hopkins said:

 

@Pioneer1 History, Huh? Lol! 

 

My history is filled with black men. My father was black. My first born daughter’s father is black.   I know black men well enough to write a book and I’ve written two! 

 

BUT critiiquing black men is not my job.  

Ali played himself in that video clip.  He was a straight embarrassment. 

 

Now let me help you out here with MY history.  

 

I’ve only had 1 marriage. 

 

I married 1 blond hair blue-eyed french /german white man who to this day still loves this dark-skinned kinky-hair black woman and the ground she walks on.  

 

And he ain’t soft like you like to think about white men.  You can’t roll with me and be soft.  

 

He would kick anyone’s ass who would dare to step to me , his black stepdaughter (yes he stepped up and raised her like his own) and African/european descent daughters... no matter what they or I wear.  And trust, no one dictates what we wear or what we do ... and he’d still defend and protect us for exercising our rights.   But then again he’s white in America so maybe that’s privilege lol. 

 

Even though we’re no longer married I considered myself lucky for choosing this strong white man as partner.

He is the kindest man I know. Ironically,  he never tried to control me or the girls...but I guess there was no need. 

 

So no, I didn’t choose white supremacy; I chose freedom -and what resulted is a white man who worships us black women...daughters of Africa, with all the respect due us.  

 

 

 

 

Ali played himself in that video clip. He was a straight embarrassment.

That's a matter of opinion.
Just like you, some of the things he said I agreed with.....other things I didn't.  I take him as an individual and his words in isolation.  Although I didn't agree with him calling Africans savages, instead being embarassed I was rather PROUD that a Black man would challenge the moral hypocrisy and questionable ethics of a White man on national television and her pretty much made a laughing stock of him on his own show....lol.

 

 

 

 

te man who to this day still loves this dark-skinned kinky-hair black woman and the ground she walks on.

It's funny how you call him "French/German" as if that makes any difference.
French and German are cultures/nationaities and have NOTHING to do with that man's genetics. You may as well have said he's Baptist/Catholic for what it's worth, lol.  Caucasian is Caucasian regardless of the language spoken or the culture practiced.

 

 



And he ain’t soft like you like to think about white men. You can’t roll with me and be soft.

I never said that White men as a whole were "soft". I personally believe that as a collective African men BY NATURE are more masculine but there are a lot of factors involved like diet, environment, nurturing, ect... Hell in some ways (namely intellectually and emotionally) White American men are more masculine tan AfroAmerican men today.

 

 

 


 

He would kick anyone’s ass who would dare to step to me , his black stepdaughter (yes he stepped up and raised her like his own) and African/european descent daughters... no matter what they or I wear. And trust, no one dictates what we wear or what we do ... and he’d still defend and protect us for exercising our rights. But then again he’s white in America so maybe that’s privilege lol.

Ohhh, so THIS explains your strange belief that Black women should be loved, served, and protected unconditionally without taking any responsibility for their behavior.
I see the "bar" was raised pretty high.....lol.

 

 

 

 

Even though we’re no longer married I considered myself lucky for choosing this strong white man as partner.
He is the kindest man I know.


So you're telling me that of all the men you've met in your family.
Of all the men you've met growing up in Brooklyn.
And from your travels around the nation and probably the world as a reporter you're going to sit up here and tell me that the kindest man you ever met just HAPPENED to be a White man???

But you want to accuse Ali of being "indoctrinated" with White Supremacy while you place a White man on top above all other men as being "supreme" in kindness....the very definition of White Supremacy.




 

 

Ironically,
he never tried to control me or the girls...but I guess there was no need.


Ofcourse he didn't need to because most  AfroAmerican girls are ALREADY conditioned to worship and revere White men through the image of a White  "Jesus" they grow up with in the church.  While Black man often get frustrated at not being able to influence the women in their family and often turn to violence to get their way out of frustration....because of this previous "Jesus" indoctrination all many White man have to do is just SHOW UP and because the ground has already been laid and cultivated for his worship in her mind she'll automatically fall in line and obey him.


 

 

So no, I didn’t choose white supremacy; I chose freedom -and what resulted is a white man who worships us black women...daughters of Africa, with all the respect due us.


Yeah....
Where was THAT type of White man when sisters like Sandra Bland and Renish McBride needed them for protection from the "other" White men who killed them?

 

 


Listen, that was a beautiful story and maybe one day I'll see it on the Lifetime channel, however none of what you said dismisses what I said previously about your motives for criticizing Black men being suspect and untrustworthy.
Infact it proves it.


-By your own admission you considered yourself fortunate (good luck, blessed, highly favored) to meet a strong White man whom you felt protected you.

-By your own admission you praise the strength of this White man.

-By your own admission you praise the kindness of this White man and place him above all other men.



Can you not see how your mind......despite the excuses you're using to justify it...has been indoctrinated with White supremacy?

Hell, even a slave (I'm not calling you one) can justify his slavery by saying his master was kind to him, gave him food, and kept him occupied with doing work he enjoyed.....but the fact remains he was STILL A SLAVE.
Excuses and justifications don't eliminate facts.

This is why I say that your MOTIVES can't be trusted when it comes to your criticizms of Ali or any other Black man despite the legitimacy of your claims. Because despite all of this talk about "female empowerment", I recognize that behind it stands a strong subconscious love and worship of White men as the "ideal man".
So every Black man you come across will be judged by this standard and ultimately considered "less than" by comparison.

 

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@Pioneer1 OK if Mel's motives can't be trusted what about mine.  I'm a Black man with over 1/2 a century of experience. I advocate for Black people on a daily basis.

 

Ali came across as an anachronism, a misogynistic throwback with a narrow minded perspective.  Sure the women looked fine, and if they wanna dress that way cool. I don't, however, but believe that any Black women should be compelled to dress this way or in any fashion dictated by a so called religion.

 

But I give Ali some latitude, he was a great boxer, but in the video he was young, not the most educated person, and a devotee of the Nation of Islam. As a result, I don't expect profound ideas to come from this man.  I do expect him to talk shit and knock people out in a boxing ring for my entertainment.

 

The problem we have is our fixation on entertainers for ideas.  As if some rapper or athlete is capable of deep thought simply because they are famous. This is not true for white folks, but for Black folks this is the surely the case. 

 

We all know how reporters seemingly seek out the craziest sounding Black person when a comment is need for a story.  This is true across the board. If we need some insight on how well the president is doing -- lets hear from Kanye.  Need relationship advise -- get Steve Harvey on the phone. Need in depth political analysis -- give Al Sharpton a TV show...

 

 

 

 

 

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23 minutes ago, Pioneer1 said:

So you're telling me that of all the men you've met in your family.
Of all the men you've met growing up in Brooklyn.
And from your travels around the nation and probably the world as a reporter you're going to sit up here and tell me that the kindest man you ever met just HAPPENED to be a White man???

But you want to accuse Ali of being "indoctrinated" with White Supremacy while you place a White man on top above all other men as being "supreme" in kindness....the very definition of White Supremacy.

 

@Pioneer1 Isn’t it funny how things work out like that?    What’s the saying “you’ve tried all the rest,  now try the best”?  

 

Seriously, though it appears that you believe recognizing someone who is treating you well or with kindness is a matter of brainswashing and conditioning.  

 

And it could be - but i’m not a church girl and didn’t allow my daughters to go to church without adult supervision  - so my conditioning is not “white jesus” nor is it - that a woman is here to be subservient to a man nor subjugated by him...  

 

Now is my former husband kind because he’s white? I don’t know - but that’s not my concern ... He’s the kindest man I know.  

 

By the way, you do know you can only judge character by  actions, right? Not one or two actions but what they do consistently.   My former husband has a good heart - and does his best to make everyone whole - it’s how he uses his privilege. 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Pioneer1 said:

So you're telling me that of all the men you've met in your family.
Of all the men you've met growing up in Brooklyn.
And from your travels around the nation and probably the world as a reporter you're going to sit up here and tell me that the kindest man you ever met just HAPPENED to be a White man???

But you want to accuse Ali of being "indoctrinated" with White Supremacy while you place a White man on top above all other men as being "supreme" in kindness....the very definition of White Supremacy.

 

This is so sad, @Pioneer1  and I recently wondered the same thing.  It breaks my heart. 

 

Do you know , a white police officer have stopped traffic to help me make a u-turn when I was lost. Once I was driving with my lights off in the whitest city of america, where Sandra Bland was from ... and a white police officer pulled me over - told me my lights were off and after I apologized and told him I didn’t realize it and that I was going to pick up my daughter - he said be careful and told me where I might find her.   

 

My point is there are two americas for black people. Sandra Bland lived in one of the wealthiest neighborhoods in America.  When she left to move Texas - I believe she forgot we black women of privilege don’t get to carry it with us.  We have to feel the temperament and tone  of the environment before we speak.  

 

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Mel

I'm not condemning the good things you're saying about your ex.  I'm not you and haven't walked in your shoes or know what you've gone through to judge your activities.  I'm just looking at the facts.

You can provide all of the justification you like but the fact remains that the man you hold as ideal above all or most other men you've ever met is a White man.  And many other women of color have done the same.....their their praise and love and reverence of White men have been used to destroy entire communities and kingdoms which is why we must be careful with these thoughts.

There are White people I like and have good things to say about, but I've never been inlove with any White person nor do I hold any White person as the best (kindest, nicest, loveliest, smartest, ect...)  in anything because that's too much like being supreme in that aspect.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Troy

Trust and mistrust are a matter of personal opinions, so as far as I'M CONCERNED Mel's criticizms of Black men can't be trusted for the above stated reasons.
But others may not care how she feels about White men (or atleas one White man) and think her criticizms are fully legitimate and justified.
But as far as you or even Cynique.....

I haven't heard you all mention anything in your backgrounds like falling involve with a White man/woman that I believe would cloud your judgement or establish ulterior motives that would cause you to subconsciously hate or think less of AfroAmerican men/women.

As far as Ali and the Nation of Islam.....
As I told Cynique.....I don't defend organized religions but I do look at RESULTS.
If a particular organization or institution produces POSITIVE RESULTS then I'm going to support those results.
Say what you want to about misogyny and anachronism but the FACTS are when those women stood up and when you look at most of the MGT in the Nation of Islam....the RESULTS are undeniable.
The vast majority of them tend to be beautiful, nice, gentle, and respectful......and get plenty of respect from the men not only in their mosques but from the Black communit in general and even around the world.
Women in the Nation of Islam are NOT treated like other AfroAmerican women even by non-Muslim Black men. I know a lot of men who won't even cuss or smoke around them.

So again, say what you will about the methods.....but the RESULTS are what I'm looking at.

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1 hour ago, Pioneer1 said:

I see the "bar" was raised pretty high.....lol

 

@Pioneer1 

Guilty - I expect men to act right.

 

But I don’t believe chastizing any man about his behavior if he doesn’t meet the criteria.  I’ll just move on.   

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7 minutes ago, Mel Hopkins said:

 

@Pioneer1 

Guilty - I expect men to act right.

 

But I don’t believe chastizing any man about his behavior if he doesn’t meet the criteria.  I’ll just move on.   

 

You're saying that a man who defends you unconditionally despite your behavior is "acting right".

What if we said that to parents?

That they should defend their children unconditionally not criticizing their behavior or expecting any responsibility from them?

What if a parent just defended the dress, speech, and behavior of their child unconditionally and went to school beating up the teachers everytime that child had poor grades or fighting the neighbors everytime that child does something destructive to their property.....

What type of adult do you think that parent would produce when the child grows up....IF they grow up?

 

 

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20 minutes ago, Pioneer1 said:

I'm just looking at the facts.

 

What are the facts? Seriously, I missed the facts.  

 

21 minutes ago, Pioneer1 said:

There are White people I like and have good things to say about, but I've never been inlove with any White person nor do I hold any White person as the best (kindest, nicest, loveliest, smartest, ect...)  in anything because that's too much like being supreme in that aspect.

 

Ok, I understand your perspective now.  

 

I always gravitated towards beautiful energy - I don’t care what skin or genes it’s wrapped in.  

 

Sadly, I’ve read this type of statement from others - it’s just that they’ve replaced “white” in the sentence with another color or ethnic group.  Still, I’m not here to change your mind - just communicate and grow from the exchange.  

27 minutes ago, Pioneer1 said:

What if we said that to parents?

 

@Pioneer1 My man is not my father - and I’m not his mother.  Please don’t creep me out here.😳

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Mel


What are the facts? Seriously, I missed the facts. 

Well ONE fact is you said:
 

Quote

 

"I considered myself lucky for choosing this strong white man as partner.

He is the kindest man I know. "

 


This statement says a number of things:

1. You chose him.....suggesting you actually went out looking for a White man.
2. You praise the strength of this White man....but White men who are strong have been known to use this strengh to brutalize and murder people of color around the planet.
3. You call him the kindest man you know....which means of all the thousands and perhaps millions of men you've come across in your life, that particular White man beat them all in terms of kindness.

Now let's look at your wording...........

You didn't say:
"He treated ME kinder than any other man that I know"   -Because if you had said this, I wouldn't have had a problem with that statement.


You said,
"He WAS THE kindest man you know"

Which suggests you know about the kindness and good deeds about all of the other men you know and have evaluated them and found them lacking in compared to this one who happens to be a White man.
You made HIM the epitome of kindness without really knowing how kind other men that you know are.

In your mind the bar or standard has been raised to the level of this White man so by default no Black man can compare.

Not that you agree with it.....but do you atleast UNDERSTAND my point?



Speaking of Sandra Bland and the police......


Did you know that the same White police officers in New York who shoved that broken plunger up Abner Louima's ass back in the 90s was married to a Black woman?

It doesn't matter how much love ONE White man has for ONE Black woman, even that one White man can "snap" and turn into a vicious racist when it comes to a Black person who is not his object of affection.
Even during slavery there were violent racist Whites whom had favor and bestowed love on PARTICULAR slaves that they liked....but it didn't make them any less racist.
History is FULL of examples of White people we THOUGHT were cool and kind turning around and committing heinous acts or bigotry.

My point is, we can't let individual interests and "falling in love" cloud our judgement to the point that we project our own individual experiences on the entire reality of race relations.

 

 

My man is not my father - and I’m not his mother. Please don’t creep me out here.


Well you can do you.
I've DEMANDED (as only a "controling" Black man can do) most of my girlfriends call me "daddy" atleast once a week....lol.

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42 minutes ago, Pioneer1 said:

He treated ME kinder than any other man that I know"   -Because if you had said this, I wouldn't have had a problem with that statement.

 

@Pioneer1  you do know I’m a writer, right? I don’t mean a diary writer - people PAY me to write.  

 

Therefore,  I say and write what I mean.  Straight no chaser. 

 

SOOOOOO

 

Why are you assuming other men in my life have been any type of kind?  

 

Also, words are important ...CHOOSE has an interesting etymology, it origins implies free will to create ... the swahili word Kuumba is the closest to the word choose - its bantu etymology means “to create something from nothing” —- so you are correct!

 

I imagined the BEST man to come into my life.  

 

After dealing with my baby daddy for all those years - who by the way said and did a lot of mean things to me - during my pregnancy and some not so nice things afterwards; I created a way for the BEST man to come into my life. 

 

And he did. And he was perfect for me.  Now did I choose him because he was white?  NOPE! I chose him because he CHOSE US...

 

42 minutes ago, Pioneer1 said:

My point is, we can't let individual interests and "falling in love" cloud our judgement to the point that we project our own individual experiences on the entire reality of race relations.

 

These are very wise words ... I hope you keep it in mind.

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11 minutes ago, Mel Hopkins said:

 

@Pioneer1  you do know I’m a writer, right? I don’t mean a diary writer - people PAY me to write.  

 

Therefore,  I say and write what I mean.  Straight no chaser. 

 

SOOOOOO

 

Why are you assuming other men in my life have been any type of kind?  

 

Also, words are important ...CHOOSE has an interesting etymology, it origins implies free will to create ... the swahili word Kuumba is the closest to the word choose - its bantu etymology means “to create something from nothing” —- so you are correct!

 

I imagined the BEST man to come into my life.  

 

After dealing with my baby daddy for all those years - who by the way said and did a lot of mean things to me - during my pregnancy and some not so nice things afterwards  I created a way for the BEST man to come into my life. 

 

And he did. And he was perfect for me.  Now did I choose him because he was white?  NOPE! I chose him because he CHOSE US...

 

 

 

Too oftern AfroAmericans project or super-impose their PERSONAL situations and experiences onto society at large.

Now I don't know this man to determine how good or bad he his BUT:

As a writer who knows the power of words you should know that when you point at a White man and say he is THE BEST MAN.....that is far different than saying he is the best man FOR ME.

When you say he is THE best man....that pretty much makes him better than everyone else in your opinion despite how good he may be for others.

Again....White Supremacy by default since the man who is epitomized as THE BEST is a White man.

 

 

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6 minutes ago, Pioneer1 said:

THE BEST MAN

 

@Pioneer1

 

CONTEXT is your friend, Black man!  When I was creating my “THE BEST MAN”- he ain’t had no color!!!  Just good character! 

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1 hour ago, Mel Hopkins said:

always gravitated towards beautiful energy - I don’t care what skin or genes it’s wrapped in.  

 

That's how I feel as well. Racism has damaged Black people by diminishing the self worth. It has also damaged White people by giving them an over inflated sense of self importance. Black people and White people live in different worlds. 

38 minutes ago, Pioneer1 said:

As a writer who knows the power of words you should know that when you point at a White man and say he is THE BEST MAN.....that is far different than saying he is the best man FOR ME.

I believe Mel said that both implicitly and explicitly. That he was the best Man for her. She even stated that she didn't know about all White Men just this particular man. 

 

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