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NubianFellow

Black Women Are Beautiful Naturally

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I overstand that the problem black women have about their beauty is perception. These perceptions are influenced by the media. Black men are also influenced by the media. Black people have been conditioned to look down on Black people. Since colonization the black population throughout the planet has been trying to adjust themselves to hold up to a false standard of beauty - an idea that I would argue is inferior to true beauty. Ironically, the false beauty is gravitated towards. It makes perfect sense because these false standards have been beaten into our ancestors and passed down through generations. We also have to consider the fact that much of the brutality that existed during slavery has been passed down genetically.

 

The fact that black women have gladly gravitated towards altering their image to keep up with these false standards is due to the Black man's failure to combat these ideals effectively. Black women wear weaves because Black men worship beauty that is not of them. Black women do the same but the focus must always be on the Black man. Now that some Black men are starting to wake up and understand their flaws, it's not fair or even reasonable to expect Black women to wake up all of a sudden, especially when the majority of Black men excuse the behavior because in reality, not even a Black woman wants to go against a Black woman.

 

The only solution to this dilemma in the black community is to focus on making sure our Black children understand that they are beautiful as they are and when I refer to Black children I am not referring to mixed children. Mixed children will have other issues they need to get past. I am only focusing on genuine Black babies. The mothers need to make a special attempt to make sure these Black children experience being around other Black women who wear their hair natural.

 

At some point, the Black community must understand how crucial it is that Black children worship and have confidence in their own form of natural beauty.  When parents do the opposite, they don't really love their children and it let's the world know that it's not about what is beneficial for those children. It's about what is beneficial for the parents. And that's the problem!

 

But when these parents transfer their own mental illness to their children, they create a repeating cycle of self hate, regardless of how they choose to describe it. As a people, we are sick and need mental help. Once we get the counseling that so many of us desperately need, then our circumstances as a group will change. As long as we don't get this help we so desperately need, nothing will change for the better.

 

Reversing the effects of supremacy will be tricky and not an easy task. In order to reverse the effects of supremacy, Black people need to become supreme. This won't happen overnight and only our children will be somewhat capable of taking us where we need to be. Today's Black people are too clueless and don't seem capable of truly fighting the effects of white supremacy.

 

The sad part is that if we don't instill new values and principles into our children, this discussion will happen again 40-50 years from now with no real change. The only way to break the cycle is through our children. They are our last hope.

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4 hours ago, NubianFellow said:

The only way to break the cycle is through our children. They are our last hope.

They ate our first hope we are the last line. Stay optimistic. 

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@Delano I can't stay optimistic about that brotha. If the kids are not our last hope and we truly are the last line, I don't have much faith in that because I don't have faith in my generation nor the generation before us. That would only reflect that we passed down our own inferior behavior to our children who are even more lost. At the end of the day, they will inherit our shame as a people as well as our confusion. I don't see much optimism in that. What's really scary is that everyone says this is the most woke we have ever been but  I'm not sure if that's so true.

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Welcome, back Nubian Fellow!    I hate false eyelashes, and I find synthetic extensions that replicate Afro hair texture to be oxymorons.  Everything is a delusion when it comes to female vanity. Black people should make stable family units a reality when it comes to progress. 

 

Anyway, you will undoubtedly  be happy to hear that 2 black women are competing to be the next mayor of Chicago, and they both wear their hair natural.  Too bad this might work against them among white voters.  That's a dilemma when seeking power.   White people fear blacks whose appearance suggests a threat or militant leanings.  Ironically what one of the candidates, who is gay, has going for her is the enthusiastic backing of the LGBT community who might neutralize the white voters who seem to be leaning toward the other candidate who is light-skinned and has naturally curly hair.  Best case scenario is that white voters will sit the election out and let these 2 black females  compete for the black vote. This is not far-fetched, because voter turnout was very low for the run-offs.  People in Chicago seemed to be disgusted with the city's politics in general.  Glad i don't have to ponder this decision, because i live in a suburb of Chicago. 

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21 hours ago, NubianFellow said:

everyone says this is the most woke we have ever been

 

What?! @NubianFellow you must have read that on Twitter. I'd argue this is the least "woke" generation since the enslavement of Blacks ended. We are so easily manipulated and distracted. We have no cohesion and by and large are motivated by corporate dictated self interest. 

 

I feel your pessimism, but you have to be optimistic -- otherwise what is the point of struggling to raise consciousness? We could all just get high, watch sports, have sex, and buy more stuff we dont need... and not worry about anything else but our own pleasure.

 

Do you have children @NubianFellow?

 

18 hours ago, Cynique said:

Everything is a delusion when it comes to female vanity. 

 

You could have stopped after the word "delusion." Increasingly it seems everything tends toward delusion; it is one reason I've opted out of social media and don't consume too much TV. 

 

Unfortuately Chicago has become the Nation's post child for Black dysfunction. Spike popularized "Chiraq" solidifying the windy city as the murder capital of the country. The distinction is undeserved and the city has a great cultural legacy but the "woke" would not be the first adjective I'd apply today. It will be interesting to see how the city fares under a Black woman.

 

 

 

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6 hours ago, Troy said:

I'd argue this is the least "woke" generation since the enslavement of Blacks ended.

 

@Troy Exactly!!!  Here's an article written 50 years ago... and here we are today still talking about white men winning and black women straightening their hair.   

There's nothing "woke" about this generation... if anything they're parroting their parents and wannabe 'freedom fighters".

 

.1969_02_18university-of-cincinnati-1_pag

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@NubianFellow @Troy  @Mel Hopkins  We all seem to be on the same page. I was just getting ready to post my thoughts when Mel's above comment agreeing with Troy's appeared.  To me, being "woke" is relative. One group's wakeful mindset is, indeed,  another's yawn of dismissal.  A very insightful definition that originated with Einstein describes insanity as continuing to repeat the same behavior over and over, and expecting a different result.  Such has been the case with black people who for a least a century have been calling for black unity year in and year out, expecting for it to become a stable reality. Crazy  apparently.   

 

Another rallying cry needs to be adopted.  Something like  "creating a village", a slogan to encourage individual black parents to simply  discipline their children to be respectful and ambitious in the hope that this admonition will be contagious and a new generation of children raised by a village of responsible parenting  will be the result.  Of course, some folks just can't be reformed and they will be relegated to the rank of collateral damage,  - participants in their own genocide.  What's left will be a thinned-out race of people who will be better equipped to ....whatever,  Awwww, just forget it.  This ain't going anywhere... 😵  Optimism is also a delusion.

 

@NubianFellow   Pictures of Chicago's 2 natural-coiffed mayoral candidates, Lori Lightfoot and Toni Preckwinkle.

 

 

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On 3/7/2019 at 1:42 PM, Cynique said:

I find synthetic extensions that replicate Afro hair texture to be oxymorons.

@Cynique I hear you sista, yet, when white people replicate the hair they were born with, it's perfectly fashionable. I suppose that is because we perceive white as normalized but if we attach ourselves to our own perception of beauty, then that ain't nothing but rebellious.  I just see a flaw in our behavior that we can quickly adapt to what they hold and value as beautiful but when we think for ourselves and make decisions for ourselves, we are being pro black extremists.

 

On 3/7/2019 at 1:42 PM, Cynique said:

Anyway, you will undoubtedly  be happy to hear that 2 black women are competing to be the next mayor of Chicago, and they both wear their hair natural. 

It doesn't make me happy these days when black people get into office. I think this is something that should work in our benefit but we usually end up with a Clarence Thomas or Barack Obama. I remember having an argument with my father when Barack got elected. My dad said he would sell out black people and I argued that he at least deserves a chance. I foolishly voted for Barack the 2nd election because I felt maybe this time he could have some type of meaningful impact as far as black people were concerned. Admitting, I only voted for Obama because he appeared black. That is a mistake I am not going to make again.

 

I believe that black people play such a weak role in politics, that collectively, the black vote doesn't really count for much. No one caters to black people. Our politicians have realized that all they have to do is sell black people a dream and they will get our votes. These women seem to be campaigning for the same thing our civil rights leaders from the 60's were fighting for, which is inclusion. To me, fighting for inclusion is pointless. White people will include black people when they are ready and no matter how much black people plead, they won't include us before they are ready to do so (If they ever get ready).

 

Also, I would never support a candidate who supports the LBGT or any other of the various forms of white supremacy.

 

11 hours ago, Troy said:

I'd argue this is the least "woke" generation since the enslavement of Blacks ended

@Troy I understand where you and @Delano are coming from when you say they are the least woke. Social media is a powerful thing and it's very telling. In my lifetime, I can't remember black people being more awake than they are right now. It may seem pessimistic to say that but I don't ever remember black people being this "woke." In the 80's we almost put Ebony magazine out of business because they showed us a picture of a Black Jesus. Martin Luther King Jr. pushed for integration until he realized his mistake (I give him credit for realizing the faulty thinking of his religious beliefs) and Malcolm X died a Muslim and called the Arabs his brothers and sisters. In the 90's it was still considered a sin to not be some form of either christian or muslim. I believe we are slowly getting past this low level of thinking.

 

I wouldn't say this was the least woke generation. I think I have been able to observe black people beginning to think for themselves and at least that's some type of progress.

 

Everyone is on this new reparations thing now which I don't believe we should accept even if they offered it to us which I believe they may do soon enough just to close down that argument. Whatever they do give us, they will get back 80 percent of it within that same year I am certain. Also, whatever they give won't even cover a percentage of the money that they truly owe us.

 

12 hours ago, Troy said:

We could all just get high, watch sports, have sex, and buy more stuff we dont need... and not worry about anything else but our own pleasure.

You just answered your question to me about my pessimism. But I don't think I am pessimistic. I believe black behavior needs to change. I think black people are too easily led by people who mean us harm. I see hope for us but our agenda has to change. I find myself caring less about his-story and more about how we can influence ourselves and our communities economically. The mighty dollar is supreme and gets worshiped by everyone. Money is also a symbol of power. If you tell black people they are gods and goddesses or kings and queens, then everyone else laughs. But if you create an economic base that empowers them, you become everyone's enemy. Black Wall Street is the only time in the history of Black people that we were so much of a threat that a bomb was used on us! Any other time they would rather tie us together and push us off of a cliff. Ironically, when you try to uplift black people, even black people will oppose you. I believe this is due to programmed recessive genes passed down from slavery and perhaps before slavery.

 

12 hours ago, Troy said:

Do you have children @NubianFellow?

@Troy I am a father of a beautiful Black son. He is on my social network platform.

 

On 3/7/2019 at 1:42 PM, Cynique said:

they both wear their hair natural.  Too bad this might work against them among white voters.

@Cynique Actually, when I am out and about, I am always surprised of the attention I get from white people concerning my hair. Even more astonishingly, white folks actually seem to embrace black people's hair more than a lot of black people do. Even though I could care less about white people embracing my hair, sometimes I actually feel like they over embrace it. I suppose that to them it's a novelty to see black people embrace their own identity without shame. They don't seem threatened by it at all for the most part.

 

We live in a period where it's more common in our culture for black women to wear weave than wear their own natural hair. Witnessing these effects of white supremacy or as some would rather say, black inferiority, NY has now passed a law that prohibits businesses from being prejudice against black people who wear their own natural hair at work. It's funny, 2019 and we are just now passing such law. Of course I expect black people to be confused about their identity. A lost people is a group of people who are very easy to control. That's why supremacists have been successful at manipulating and controlling us for centuries.

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2 hours ago, NubianFellow said:

Troy I understand where you and @Delano are coming from when you say they are the least woke

I don't believe I made a comment. 

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On 3/7/2019 at 4:13 AM, Delano said:

They ate our first hope we are the last line.

@Delano Sorry brotha, I took that statement to mirror what Troy stated. I apologize if I read your statement incorrectly. I took it to mean that you were saying the children can't be our last hope because  they weren't qualified or "woke" enough.

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17 hours ago, NubianFellow said:

Witnessing these effects of white supremacy or as some would rather say, black inferiority, NY has now passed a law that prohibits businesses from being prejudice against black people who wear their own natural hair at work. It's funny, 2019 and we are just now passing such law. Of course I expect black people to be confused about their identity. A lost people is a group of people who are very easy to control. That's why supremacists have been successful at manipulating and controlling us for centuries.

i don't know whether you can legislate the acceptance of hairstyles that the mainstream deems bizarre. Private industry can find ways to circumvent this law via of promotions and perks. Furthermore, there is hair, and there are hair styles.  A lot of these extreme styles  are not natural, They are extended bedecked affectations.  And i continue to dispute your assertion that black people are confused about their identity. if they can trace their roots back 3 or 4 generations in this country, and most can,  they know who they are and should not be encouraged to ignore this by those who want to dictate to others what they should consider themselves to be. The only people who are lost are those who ignore what information is available, preferring to imagine and concoct who their long lost ancestors might have could have should have been.  These fanatics are who are dangling  in a limbo of their own making.  To each his own.  

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6 hours ago, Cynique said:

A lot of these extreme styles  are not natural, They are extended bedecked affectations.

I think hairstyles are cool. I do not oppose black people wearing hairstyles. I personally think that hair hats are silly for the most part. Unless someone has a sickness or disease that prevents their hair from growing naturally, it's totally uncalled for. Hair hats are odd because you are normally supposed to take hats off, not keep them on forever. Then there is the health issues of wearing these hair hats. It's dirty and unclean because many who wear these weaves don't remove it to wash their actual hair. Sometimes when the hair hats are removed, there are all kinds of stuff living in that hair and on the scalp. We are not talking about women who wear weaves once in a while to enjoy a new trendy style... we are talking about women who wear hair hats for most of their lives while ignoring their natural hair. That's not sane. That's not clean. Sometimes, it's actually disgusting.

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On 3/1/2019 at 9:38 AM, Pioneer1 said:

But my identifying individuals who clearly see White people are supeior may help CLARIFY that reality so that people are not confused or decieved as to who is for White supremacy and who is against it.

 

Ugh... @Pioneer1 Thank you for taking the time to respond. I appreciate your comments. But I think the problem I am having on this topic may also be personal too because of some of the bitter situations tht I have experienced too and so, I think I have heard a different perspective than you have. And also, I don't see myself nor you as being immune to White Supremacy. Pioneer, you don't think that you have had this problem? I believe we all have had this issue. I may be wrong, but I just don't believe that @Mel Hopkins statements equates to her being what you have concluded. At any rate, I think that we as humans in general, have been conditioned and manipulated by big government in so many ways, it's not easy to make any conclusions on others. It also seems obvious to me that you don't understand why I keep bringing up the media hype about the late Areath Franklins funeral and the reaction of that Black man (pastor) in relation to this subject. But maybe if a flip it, you may understand. PIoneer, what if there was an ALL WHITE or predominantly White funeral and a BLack girl was in the place of Arianne Grande. What if that Black girl wore a mini skirt and was asked to perform a song at this funeral; and then what if a White man (pastor) grabbed this Black girl wearing a mini-skirt, around the waist and pulled her close to him and massaged the sides of her breast and speak on the mic of how happy he was to have her be there in an audience of a bunch of White females, older and younger; Pioneer, do you believe the White women would be quiet about this kind of reaction? Do you think that kind of reaction from a White man would be acceptable to his White peers? You said that you didn't have a problem with it, but I think that your reaction shows, a White Superiority complex that you may not recognize. 

 

If a White young woman wore a mini skirt at a formal affair that is predominantly White, surely, she make get some negative remarks from some women, but the atmosphere would be different if the girl was BLack and no White man would justify it. Also, if a young Black girl wore a mini skirt at ARetha Franklins funeral at the podium, surely she might get some negative remarks from Black women, but the atmosphere is different, IMO, because Ms. Grande is White, nevertheless, you as a man are justifying it. Again, no White man would refute White women if they rejected a sleezy dressed Black girl at a formal White event. Black men, in the past have done this commonly; they oppress Black women but allow other kinds of women to have lower standards with in the Black culture. That is White Superiority expressed in the Black world.

 

On 3/1/2019 at 9:38 AM, Pioneer1 said:

It's when comparing them to men of your own race you declare them BETTER....that's the problem.
It's not enough to simply find someone they love and be content and happy; they often go out of their way to ATTACK their own race and often  opposite sex of their own race out of anger or hatred. 

 

Yes, we as African Americans have this problem, both genders.

On 3/1/2019 at 9:38 AM, Pioneer1 said:

Again, you're trying to JUSTIFY and EXPLAIN AWAY why she believes that a White man is the best man instead of simply CONDEMNING it.


1. For the record, many Black men have also been AB-USED by Black women as well, but that's not an excuse to condemn Black women or declare White women as better and you won't catch me justifying it.

 

Again, he is the best man for her; that is what I heard. And here, you have repeated this statement and I agree that this is a problem amongst us, and it's good to know that you would not do this. As for me, I have heard of some horror stories about Black women being raped and etc. by Black men and therefore, I cannot judge another person because, I believe that this system is the bigger problem starting back to the slave yard where this kind of behavior was encouraged. 

On 3/1/2019 at 9:38 AM, Pioneer1 said:

2. Much of what many of these women are calling "abuse" isn't really abuse at all but rather a misunderstanding. A misunderstanding of the nature of the opposite sex as well as a misunderstanding of gender roles.
If a man physically harms you that's clearly abuse, but if gets loud and angry from time to time or stares at other women in lust from time to time....is THAT abuse?
Or is that a man acting out his nature as a man?

 

Oh Hell no... Here we go ...

 

On 3/1/2019 at 9:38 AM, Pioneer1 said:

In my observations, most Latina and Arab women KNOW their men and KNOW many of them tend to be very "macho" as part of their culture so they have learned HOW to talk to them to bring out better results from them and get along as a community. 

 

You are completely wrong here. I worked round several foreign women from the Middle East, and this is NOT true. They are very oppressed by this kind of behavior that you describe that should be acceptable.

 

On 3/5/2019 at 4:19 PM, Delano said:

 

Chevdove 

I feel has the strongest ideals. The statements she is making is the distillation of life. However if the idea has enough gravitas she will incorporate it into her world view .

 

 

@Delano I love it! You are brilliant!

 

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On 3/8/2019 at 10:03 PM, NubianFellow said:

Also, I would never support a candidate who supports the LBGT or any other of the various forms of white supremacy.

 

@NubianFellow Did you make this decision after you voted for Barack Obama in the 2nd term?

 

On 3/8/2019 at 10:03 PM, NubianFellow said:

I foolishly voted for Barack the 2nd election because I felt maybe this time he could have some type of meaningful impact as far as black people were concerned. Admitting, I only voted for Obama because he appeared black. That is a mistake I am not going to make again.

 

In his 2nd term, I think his slogan was CHANGE and it had to do with this homosexual (pedophile) law and he made this clear well before people went to the polls to vote. Because I take this pedophilia issue hard, I do Not understand how Black people could have not seen this issue. It just does not make any sense to me. I kind of remember Chris Rock saying something about this and then he was shut down. But Barack's mother, Stanley, let him be raised up by her father, Stanley, a White man! She was not around but lived, I think, in Indonesia with another husband. Barack did not know his African-Kenyan father. So, I do not understand how Black people cannot see that he was selected to put in this homosexual law due to his upbringing. Maybe for White people, the homosexual-pedophilia issue is okay, but are beginning in this government is based on CHILD RAPE, and little Black boys 'maleness' was comprimised!!! I just don't understand how Black people accepted this. It's baffling to me. 

On 3/8/2019 at 10:03 PM, NubianFellow said:

In the 80's we almost put Ebony magazine out of business because they showed us a picture of a Black Jesus

 

LOL! true!

 

On 3/8/2019 at 10:03 PM, NubianFellow said:

Martin Luther King Jr. pushed for integration until he realized his mistake (I give him credit for realizing the faulty thinking of his religious beliefs)

 

You're right, 'religious beliefs' and 'Integration' is a flaw that is NOT apart of ancient script. The 'Black Jesus' had nothing to do with the Romans, but some of them came up to him. We have been deceived and need to go back and find out the truth. 

On 3/8/2019 at 10:03 PM, NubianFellow said:

and Malcolm X died a Muslim and called the Arabs his brothers and sisters. In the 90's it was still considered a sin to not be some form of either christian or muslim. I believe we are slowly getting past this low level of thinking.

 

We will continue to be confused about this historical religions if we don't consider the global aspect and the origins of these cultures over hear in Western Civilization. It is a low level of thinking that will continue to be used against us if we are not educated properly. Most of the world, even today, still operates under these religions under a different understanding and the Western World cannot get rid of them like they have done over here. We've been lied to and confused. 

The Arabs are NOT the beginning of the Muslim religion but that is what Malcolm was made to falsely believe and it led to a big fallout over here in America. Those Islamic warriors over there in the east world did not form with the ARabs, but they formed amongst themselves, meaning Negroes. The Hebrew Israelites and the Islamic warriors and the Muslims formed and eventually the ARabs became apart of some of their formations by and by... we've been mis-educated over here. 

Those religions and other ancient religions are still the basis for many people all around the globe, and they will not discard their relgion for the western world. It's not going to happen. 

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@Chevdove

50 minutes ago, Chevdove said:

Did you make this decision after you voted for Barack Obama in the 2nd term?

I looked past it because I wanted to give the black man another chance and I was hoping that movement was just a tactic to get elected. I had no idea that movement would replace the black voice or even compete with it. I was conflicted in voting for him but he was the best candidate and I admit, I only voted for him the second time because he was black. I am guilty as charged. I admit, it was a foolish decision. You would think Trump would have tried to reverse that the way he is reversing everything else sellout Obama did.

 

1 hour ago, Chevdove said:

We will continue to be confused about this historical religions

I agree wholeheartedly with that. That is, after all, the purpose of its existence. Everyone is a slave to something.

 

I feel that we should make wealth our religion and practice it by wealth building. We need to create cash flow among ourselves and get paid! I wonder if black people would cooperate with such a system if it was created just to empower them.

 

 

 

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On 3/10/2019 at 5:04 AM, Chevdove said:

Again, he is the best man for her; that is what I heard. And here, you have repeated this statement 

@Chevdove , @Pioneer1 knows what I wrote, he is just acting ignorant.  

 

No man (black, white et al) has ever abused me - but that doesn’t mean they were kind. It just means they behaved the way they should in society.  No one gets points for behaving as s/he ought to. 

 

My former husband is the kindest man I know and was the best man for me which is why I married him. 

 

But for some reason, Pioneer believes I should lower my standards to accept any kind of behavior from a man in my life.  No, it doesn’t work like that with me. I’ve never been a “good enough” woman. 

 

Further,I’m not going to accept Pioneer’s half-baked theory that black men are agressive sexual miscreants and should be accepted as such.  That’s silly.

 

Ali may be Pioneer’s ideal specimen of a man but  In that video clip Pioneer posted Ali was ridiculous ; calling black Africans savages and likening his wife to a piece of retail merchandise.

 

Ali sat in the chair spewing that nonsense and had to be corrected by a british man about African culture. Now how are you as a black man going to let a european teach you about your own culture? 

 

So I rejected Pioneer’s hero and that’s  when he got butthurt and  

deflected to my former husband. He claimed I couldn’t speak on black men’s behavior because my ex is white. 

 

Now, I ignored  that statement because it was offensive. It was as if Pioneer was saying I raised the bar that no black man could reach.  - It was as if he put white men on a pedestal - something I never considered.  Sure,  I trolled Pioneer by playing up my husband’s features - but seriously my ex is  a kind man and good father. His daughters adore him - so why would anyone condemn him.  

 

But then he used my words to fit his narrative;  putting his inferiority complex on display.  I can’t debate anyone’s weakness.  But I do thank you, Chevdove, for hearing me. 

 

Note: I’ll do my best to retun and clean up my typos later.

 

 

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7 hours ago, Delano said:

Not everyone who shares your colour shares your values. 

 

@Delano, yes!  Psychic twin, I need this skill.  

i wrote the same thing in response to a post here - but mine was 350+ words... yet this is exactly what I meant! 

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8 hours ago, Delano said:

Not everyone who shares your colour shares your values. 

 

@Delano Another brilliant statement!

On 3/10/2019 at 6:52 AM, NubianFellow said:

You would think Trump would have tried to reverse that the way he is reversing everything else sellout Obama did.

 

@NubianFellow Amazing statement-- This is the second time I have heard this statement from a Black man! That is so insane because, even back then, during the campaign--the first campaign for his office, I knew that he would be used to promote the White cause--no matter how he felt about Black people. I think highly of Barack Obama though, but this system is bent on exploiting us for their cause. This system was fixed on making us Black Americans the poster child for homosexuality and therefore, this was the main purpose, IMO for putting Obama in office. My problem with this issue of 'homosexuality' is that it is not the 'whole'!!! The beginning of homosexuality--a long, long, long time ago is PEDOPHILIA!!! So therefore, I always see the dual aspect of this term 'homosexuality. Today, it doesn't matter to me who chooses to be homosexual, but what enrages me is that in the beginning... it was the main tool aimed against BLACK MANHOOD. Period! People got angry with the statement of the Russian leader for also saying this very thing in that the beginning of homosexuality is pedophilia, but this is the truth. This issues cannot be forced upon a grown man or an adult, but it was introduced and put on a child and this is a great evil. Barach Obamas childhood was nurtured under a White Grandfather who was really racist and I just can't get past this point and don't understand how Black America, especially 'the Church' can ignore this point. Stanely Dunham was a rebel in his day and even he had a very troubled childhood. He witnessed trauma in his childhood in reference to his mother who had apparently committed suicide. He and his wife fled to Hawaii from Kansus during the Civil Rights Movement and wanted nothing to do with Black peoples issues, and yet he was the one to raise Obama. Geez. 

 

As far as Obama himself, I saw his anguish over Black issues and believe he was fighting for our cause but he was undercut a lot. 

On 3/10/2019 at 6:52 AM, NubianFellow said:

I agree wholeheartedly with that. That is, after all, the purpose of its existence. Everyone is a slave to something.

 

Scary thought. But yes, seems true unless we today, can go back in time and see how things were set up and continued on and on for thousands of years.

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On 3/10/2019 at 6:52 AM, NubianFellow said:

I feel that we should make wealth our religion and practice it by wealth building.

 

Yes this would be great but under these big governments, what I have seen already is how when certain Black people get going, they soon are approached and completely bought out-- it seems-- by force!!! For example, I remember seeing the hype about FUBU and wondered what it was and then soon, I saw that it was a clothes line that, to my surprise, did become amazingly successful! I couldn't believe it. But, I loved some of the clothes and bought them. Then they became bought out--completely!!! LOL. I couldn't believe it. Then I saw another Black business, a well known restaurant who had soul food and everyone from many cultures came. It was always filled to the max! But then to my surprise, they were bought out! I couldn't believe it. Asian companies bought out both businesses, the FUBU and the restaurant. So, I went to the soul food restaurant that was in the mall, and was seated by Chinese management and the family ran the whole business. Wow! Chinese people selling soul food. What a thought. It's hard for me to grasp. I slowed down from going after I got sick one time. I am not too sure about being served soul food from the workers now, who are all non-black. LOL.

 

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Chev

Thank you for taking the time to respond. I appreciate your comments.

You're more than welcome sis.



I keep bringing up the media hype about the late Areath Franklins funeral and the reaction of that Black man (pastor) in relation to this subject. But maybe if a flip it, you may understand. PIoneer, what if there was an ALL WHITE or predominantly White funeral and a BLack girl was in the place of Arianne Grande. What if that Black girl wore a mini skirt and was asked to perform a song at this funeral; and then what if a White man (pastor) grabbed this Black girl wearing a mini-skirt, around the waist and pulled her close to him and massaged the sides of her breast and speak on the mic of how happy he was to have her be there in an audience of a bunch of White females, older and younger; Pioneer, do you believe the White women would be quiet about this kind of reaction? Do you think that kind of reaction from a White man would be acceptable to his White peers? You said that you didn't have a problem with it, but I think that your reaction shows, a White Superiority complex that you may not recognize.

I fail to see how this has anything to do with Black women who glorify and praise White men as being better than Black men, but I welcome an explaination from you on how my reaction to the Ariana Grande "fake outrage" shows a White Superiority complex.
 

 

 

Again, he is the best man for her; that is what I heard. And here, you have repeated this statement and I agree that this is a problem amongst us, and it's good to know that you would not do this. As for me, I have heard of some horror stories about Black women being raped and etc. by Black men and therefore, I cannot judge another person because

But 2 things:

1. Regardless of what you may have heard, she actually SAID and I quote from Mel herself:

 

Quote

"I considered myself lucky for choosing this strong white man as partner.
He is the kindest man I know. "


https://aalbc.com/tc/topic/5676-black-women-are-beautiful-naturally/page/5/

Lol....I'm not making this stuff up.

She said outright that a White man was kinder than any of the Black and Brown men she's ever come across AND she feels lucky for choosing a strong White man!




2. I've repeatedly asked you what were YOUR negative experiences with Black men.
Not what you've "heard" or what you were told or what you saw in a documentary or read in a novel, but what have YOU experienced that was worse than how your White principle treated you....and you failed to provide personal testimony.

 

 

 

You are completely wrong here. I worked round several foreign women from the Middle East, and this is NOT true. They are very oppressed by this kind of behavior that you describe that should be acceptable.

They may or may not be more oppressed, but one thing is for sure....
As a whole they seem to respect and honor THEIR men more than AfroAmerican women respect and honor theirs.

AfroAmerican women are among the freest and lease oppressed (by their own men) women on the planet!

I'm not saying that AfroAmerican women aren't oppressed....because you are.
But not by us.
Yet, few other women seem to get on the national stage and openly criticize Black men and even call them out by race like Black women in America do.
Even when White women criticize their men they'll say "men" in general....they don't say "White men".

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17 hours ago, Pioneer1 said:

She said outright that a White man was kinder than any of the Black and Brown men she's ever come across AND she feels lucky for choosing a strong White man!

 

@Pioneer1I see you had to add a word to make your weak point.  Wow, now it's really clear why you posted that Ali clip ...pathetic recognizes pathetic.

 

Further , I know English isn't your first language but there's a difference between  "THIS" and "A"... now since I'm not your ESL teacher , I should leave it there, but I'm feeling charitable today.  Those articles change the context of THE sentence.    So before you attempt to imply I'm speaking for an entire ethnic group; brush up on  your English skills.     As for him being the kindest man - you're correct he is kinder than any other man (from any other ethnic group) I've known.  Certainly kinder than your hero (in his early days) but that's really a disservice to my former husband ...because your Hero , the young Ali, was on some crazy ish back then. 

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7 hours ago, Delano said:

You should have stopped right there. 


You should have stopped the FIRST time you realized it was a MAN and not a woman, but you didn't....lol.



 

Mel

I see you had to add a word to make your weak point.

A couple corrections:

1. Actually I didn't have just A point but 2 points:

a) I originally entered this thread to prove to Nubian Fellow that he's wasting time and energy trying to convince women who DO NOT consider him an ally or even a brother to agree with him about the beauty of Black women.
The self hatred and love of White masculinity is far too strong.

b) After your criticizm of the Ali video my 2nd point was to prove that YOUR negative criticizms of Black men can't be trusted given your background of love for White men.
Which leads to the second correction.........

 


2. My points aren't weak.
Actually they are quite effective because I've proven both of them using YOUR OWN WORDS.

E.g. ......

 

Quote

 

I imagined the BEST man to come into my life.
 

After dealing with my baby daddy for all those years - who by the way said and did a lot of mean things to me - during my pregnancy and some not so nice things afterwards; I created a way for the BEST man to come into my life.


And he did.
 

https://aalbc.com/tc/topic/5676-black-women-are-beautiful-naturally/page/5/

 


-You said you created a way for the BEST MAN to come into your life
-A WHITE MAN came into your life

Based on logic and simple math, one could only conclude that according to you:   BEST MAN = A WHITE MAN.


Whether others ACCEPT this or not has absolutely no effect on it's validity.

 

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15 minutes ago, Pioneer1 said:
6 hours ago, Delano said:

You should have stopped right there. 


You should have stopped the FIRST time you realized it was a MAN and not a woman, but you didn't....lol.

Put the crack pipe down before you pick up a pen.

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52 minutes ago, Pioneer1 said:

I originally entered this thread to prove to Nubian Fellow that he's wasting time and energy trying to convince women who DO NOT consider him an ally or even a brother to agree with him about the beauty of Black women.
The self hatred and love of White masculinity is far too strong.

@Pioneer1You're full of it. i'll let Mel speak for herself but, me,  I like Nubian fellow and love the way he articulates his points. Not seeing eye-to-eye when it comes to black hair is the thing he and I disagree about. We haven't clashed about any other aspect of black beauty.   He's very perceptive and realistic when it comes to black men, as well as the ramifications of Africa's downfall. And he is not obsessed with the ridiculous idea that black women idolize all white men and look down on all black ones.  Your lies about us equating wealth coupled with kindness as a sign of extraordinary masculinity is just another indication of how you distort things.  It's ludicrous for you to think you have to hip Nubian Fellow about what only exists in your mind, especially since he's perfectly capably of using his own judgment when it comes to the position taken by the women here. With nothing to back you up, you have tried to make him your ally by planting the idea in his head that we aren't or wouldn't be his ally, when we might very well be so, depending on the circumstances. And your petulant accusation about black women hating themselves just because after 4 centuries, they have earned the right to be their version of mainstream America is just an example of your stagnancy. Finally, why wouldn't we consider Nubian Fellow a "brother"?   It's all in the family.

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13 hours ago, Pioneer1 said:

Based on logic and simple math, one could only conclude that according to you:   BEST MAN = A WHITE MAN.

Welp, your comprehension is illogical  and that’s shoddy math. But if that’s your world view then you own it.   Your inferiority complex has nothing to do with me or my words.  

 

As for this topic; it states the obvious.  Black women ARE beautiful. It is part of record and was never up for debate. 

 

“Then will I swear beauty herself is black,
  And all they foul that thy complexion lack.”  Shakespeare~ Sonnet 132 
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On 3/11/2019 at 5:59 PM, Pioneer1 said:

I fail to see how this has anything to do with Black women who glorify and praise White men as being better than Black men, but I welcome an explaination from you on how my reaction to the Ariana Grande "fake outrage" shows a White Superiority complex.

 

@Pioneer1 That's funny that you coined the hype 'fake outrage'. I think today there are so many other more important issues that this media hype was not that important either and it may have been hyped up, but however, this tactic, in ancient times is one of the very modes of how we as Black-African-typed people have been conquered. And so, I can understand why I am not making sense to you about 'a white women coming into a Black environment and presenting themselves in a fashion that the Black kings would NOT ALLOW THEIR OWN WOMANKING TO DO. I can understand why you and perhaps many other Black men still today cannot recognize this issue as a method of White Supremacy and in how they were eventually overthrown. So, I guess, I will leave off from this scenario. But, before I do completely, I think that this very thread sort of touches upon what I am addressing. Many Black women today wear 'White women hair textures--that are NOT growing from our scalps and this was introduced to us, not only through modern slavery but a long time ago, in Africa and elsewhere. And now, we Black women are being bashed by many Black men that do not take responsibility for their part in this trend. NubianFEllow does speak on this though, he does say how Black men share apart in this issue. 

 

If Black men obssess over non-African traits in the presence of their own womankind then that is a form of White Idolation--White Supremacy, and from this too, some Black men harbor hatred and rejection against BLack women who do not have 'good hair' or 'curly hair'; That is a form of White Supremacy. We as Black people can also be defined as being 'White Supremacist' and that is why I don't feel that you should charge other INDIVIDUALS and attack them for issues that you feel are White Supremacist beliefs. Pioneer, we all have to deal with issues of racism and have to sift through the kind of people, Black, White or other, that are spritually whole or not. 

On 3/11/2019 at 5:59 PM, Pioneer1 said:

She said outright that a White man was kinder than any of the Black and Brown men she's ever come across AND she feels lucky for choosing a strong White man!

 

LOL. You are so off track, IMO. I just can't understand why your are reading into this. Everyone has a different experience and meet various people along the pathway of life. Do you think that Black African Americans should not marry out of their race/culture? If a Strong White man or Strong Black man is attracted to a woman and marries her, then the woman should feel that this man is 'the best man for her'. For a White man to marry out of his race or a Black man to marry out of his race is a conscious step in this world and due to how horrible this system as been, a man would have to be strong IMO when it comes to these choices; that is how I feel. I a non-African man asked me to marry him (of which has happened to me!), I would know that he is making a strong stance about his manhood. There are so many ways that @Mel Hopkins statement could be viewed, IMO and I do feel that you are imposing your ideals on her due to issues that you, as a Black man has come across. 

 

On 3/11/2019 at 5:59 PM, Pioneer1 said:

2. I've repeatedly asked you what were YOUR negative experiences with Black men.
Not what you've "heard" or what you were told or what you saw in a documentary or read in a novel, but what have YOU experienced that was worse than how your White principle treated you....and you failed to provide personal testimony.

 

You're right! I have been dodging! And, I do have some personal stories but, I am trying to figure out how to write them down and am wrestling with some thoughts for certain reasons. For one, I did share a personal story in another thread and I feel that was a very good response to this topic!!!--But you may not have read it or agreed! Another reason I am slow to respond is because I have a problem speaking about certain issues about Black men because--I did not come into this community with the goal to speak against Black men-- therefore, I am trying to figure out how to speak about this kind of 'Black Disrespect coming from Black men to wards me as a Black woman' in such a way that it will not be detrimental as a whole. 

@Pioneer1 Another reason why I have not responded to you about this is because, it hurts deeply, as in the story that I did share in another thread. It is very demeaning when a Black man attacks a Black woman and in that story that I told, had it not been for other kind of men that responded to me positively, it would have been impossible to have a healthy self-esteem in that environment that I was a part of. 

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Wait-a-minute, I think I wrote about this incident in this very thread?

On 3/11/2019 at 5:59 PM, Pioneer1 said:

As a whole they seem to respect and honor THEIR men more than AfroAmerican women respect and honor theirs.

 

Yes, this may be true but, they do not have the same history that we have and this is very important.

On 3/11/2019 at 5:59 PM, Pioneer1 said:

AfroAmerican women are among the freest and lease oppressed (by their own men) women on the planet!

 

That is just crazy wrong! LOL!

I don't watch TV that much but I have seen shows in which it is commonplace in how Black men obsess over non-Black women and I don't see this coming from any other race/culture! You don't see the connection to 'oppression' in this regard?

On 3/11/2019 at 5:59 PM, Pioneer1 said:

I'm not saying that AfroAmerican women aren't oppressed....because you are.
But not by us.

 

AGain, PIoneer, this is so wrong. At one point in the past, someone was able to come into Africa and set up human slavery and therefore, this process begins within our circles for what ever reason. Black men were not protecting their people for some reason.

On 3/11/2019 at 5:59 PM, Pioneer1 said:

Yet, few other women seem to get on the national stage and openly criticize Black men and even call them out by race like Black women in America do.
Even when White women criticize their men they'll say "men" in general....they don't say "White men".

 

I agree! And it happens both ways though, sadly, IMO. It happens both ways, we, as BLack men and women demean each other in this mode and I suppose that may have been one of the reasons we were overpowered and enslaved. 

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On 3/7/2019 at 3:55 PM, NubianFellow said:

overstand that the problem black women have about their beauty is perception.

How can you understand what someone's problem is, if you aren't them. Or dinner  experience their triumphs and frustration. How can a man know what life is like for a woman. 

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5 hours ago, Chevdove said:

I have a problem speaking about certain issues about Black men because--I did not come into this community with the goal to speak against Black men-- therefore, I am trying to figure out how to speak about this kind of 'Black Disrespect coming from Black men to wards me as a Black woman' in such a way that it will not be detrimental as a whole.

 

This is powerful!

 

We do protect a black man’s image, don’t we? 

 

I think this is why so many are having a negative reaction to the R Kelly saga... Black women have covered black men for so long - that many (mostly men but women too) are shocked that a black woman produced and directed the film that gave his alleged victims a platform. 

 

Many black women have normalized the horrible treatment they’ve receive at the hands of black men, they call men “soft” who treat them well. 

 

Go on social media and you’ll see some black men say they  are supposed to be “Future” to their “Ciara”.   Instead of being kind to their woman; as Ciara’s husband “Russell” is to her.    

 

Those are the same black men who believe Ciara will tire of how well her husband treats her and her son with Future and she’ll come crawling back to Future.   That’s how brain damaged some of young black men (and black women) are today. 

 

But I digress.    I know some of my experiences with black men aren’t for publication either. And I can tell you, it’s those stories that haunt me; making it difficult to finish my second book. 

 

Some times, I tell myself that I’m being too sensitive or maybe I deserved it - but then I realize that is exactly how battered women rationalize their relationship experiences.  

 

 So, yes I’ve been sorely disrespected by many black men. None of it deserved. But those experiences afforded me a lot of painful life lessons too.  And now I know what it is like to experience kindness. 

 

Yet, I absolutely understand your position. 

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1 hour ago, Mel Hopkins said:

Go on social media and you’ll see some black men say they  are supposed to be “Future” to their “Ciara”.

 

Nope I won't.  Listening to the kind of men who actively engage on social media is where you get into trouble, being feed a distorted perspective. None of the men I hang with engages with or consumes the stuff that social media feeds you,  Truth be told the reference "'Future' to their 'Ciara.'" is lost on me.

 

1 hour ago, Mel Hopkins said:

We do protect a black man’s image, don’t we? 

 

I agree women do provide a prodigious level of protection for Black men -- those who are rich and famous.  Sure Bill Cosby, Michael Jackson, OJ, R Kelly, Tupac, MIke Tyson, whoever -- as long as a Brother has fame and wealth Sisters will bend over backwards making excuses to protect them -- at least until white folk say they are no good.

 

Now as far the regular brothers out there holding down jobs, raising their families, and doing their best in a hostile environment.  These Brothers are lucky if they get the support of the mothers. Rarely do they get the benefit of a "ride or die" Sister who'll hold a Brother down through the hard times. @Cynique, has an idea of the hate a Brother like me has to deal with from "sisters" 😉

 

I'm sorry to read some dumb Brothers have sorely disrespected you @Mel Hopkins.  Those cats aren't the norm.

 

BTW I don't think that quote from Shakespeare has anything to do with the beauty of Black women. Which play is it from?  Also have to know quoting another white man, in this context, is like feed raw meat to @Pioneer1 LOL!

 

3 hours ago, Delano said:

How can a man know what life is like for a woman. 

 

Why not @Delano

 

First your statement implies that the women themselves understand their own motivations.  The point @NubianFellow is trying to make is that the women are largely unaware of what influences their own behavior. Consider for example how marketers have made a science of subliminal manipulation -- social media has put this shit on steroids.  Trying to explain to someone on social media that their behavior, and emotional state is under the control of the platform they are on would sound ludicrous to them.

 

The cultural influences that determine what we find beautiful and how women see themselves is defined by the dominate culture over hundred of years of domination. Many are no more aware of this influence than the drones who slavishly watch their cell phone scrolling through a feed. Nubian is trying to give people the "red pill."  The thing Nubian is missing is that you can't force people to take the red pill you have to give them a choice -- the majority of us will chose the "Blue Pill," 

 

Second, one can know what it is like to be in another shoes through dialog, conversation, study.

 

Finally one's experiences are unique. I could know far more about what it is like to be  Mel than I can know what it is like to be you. We are all more similar than we are different.  You make it seem like women are from another planet and than men are simply too stupid to understand women at all.  Shoot many women don't understand other women!

 

Now I don't argue with folks about Black woman's hair any more that I do religion or politics. The beliefs one holds usually have nothing to do with reason or logic.  Once a person beliefs are based upon say, faith in a book King James commissioned, or say in a belief 45 will make the country great again.  It is time to move on.

 

 

 

 

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20 minutes ago, Troy said:

Second, one can know what it is like to be in another shoes through dialog, conversation, study.

Ask the women if this is true in this forum or anywhere else. 

 

Noticed that Mel liked my comment to Nubian. Why di yiu think is the case. 

So you think women feel heard and respected by men. 

@Troy

And how did you arrive at the position? 

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5 hours ago, Delano said:

How can you understand what someone's problem is, if you aren't them. Or dinner  experience their triumphs and frustration. How can a man know what life is like for a woman. 



:lol:  How can you ask these questions of NF when just a few days ago YOU were speaking for feminists and what they took issue with even though YOU weren't one yourself?






 

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15 minutes ago, Pioneer1 said:



:lol:  How can you ask these questions of NF when just a few days ago YOU were speaking for feminists and what they took issue with even though YOU weren't one yourself?






 

Can you be just a little less dense?

That's a rhetorical question.

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1 hour ago, Troy said:

First your statement implies that the women themselves understand their own motivations.  The point @NubianFellow is trying to make is that the women are largely unaware of what influences their own behavio

 

Really @Troy?  Really Agent Provocateur? 

 

Then this means you don’t have a clue as to what influences your own behavior.

 

You came from a woman.

 

A woman gave you your primary education.

 

It’s the same education that you built on.  So, since your mother didn’t know what influenced her, your foundation is weak at best.

 

Would this be correct? 

 

If yes, then I’m not sure what influence you’re under but those black men are the norm.  

 

There’s a reason we women call some black men “rare air” brothers.

 

They are rare!   

 

But for the average black man?  I can predict what they are going to say before they say it.  Same thing Nubian wrote; what you call the “red pill” was said by some tired ole “woke” “militant” 50 years ago.  I even posted the article.  The tired rhetoric is INEFFECTIVE.   Ain’t nothing life-changing about some rehashed 50-year-old commentary on black women.

 

You say don’t go on social media? This is social media!  And the same thing young black men say on twitter, facebook, instagram is the same exact thing said here!

 

Except there, they plug in the latest celebrity’s name to go with the rhetoric. 

 

The young black women even have a “name” for those young black men...”F-Boys” and “Ashy Larry”  They even add twitter accounts to list so ofher young black women know who to avoid.  I guess they know who IS not an influencer. 

 

So, anyway, you may not know the names but you do know the language. It’s the same. 

 

@Del and Richard Murrary bring new thought to the forum... but maybe that’s because Del left the states... or simply both have elevated their thinking.

 

Anyway, folks like shiny things...you should know this by now - or is it lost on you that you’re inviting purple

hair women into your orbit? smh 

 

And yes, I selected Shakespeare on purpose because contrary to your misguided belief I’m 100 percent conscious. i’m very deliberate in my actions.  Like I said those were painful life lessons but they taught me how land body blows. 

 

Heh heh heh...

Edited by Mel Hopkins
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