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What is African American Culture?


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9 hours ago, Pioneer1 said:

i see Del isn't the only one who needs to be educated.
You need a geography lesson.

And I suppose according to your logic just because  things are "based on the same principles" that means they're the same.....lol.

 

What a pathetic attempt to obliterate your ignorance.  You are really stupid enough to think that all you have to do is contradict something and that makes it wrong.  And you did this without even bothering to offer facts or information that would prove you right. Haiti is a country located on the island of Hispaniola, east of Cuba in the Greater Antilles archipelago of the Caribbean Sea and covers 27,560 square kilometers of land and 190 square kilometers of water, making it the 149th largest nation in the world with a total area of 27,750 square kilometers. Jamaica is a beautiful island paradise located in the western Caribbean or the West Indies.Kingston is the capital city of Jamaica. It has a population of 937,700, and is located on a latitude of 18 and longitude of -76.79. Kingston is also the political center of Jamaica, which is considered a Constitutional Monarchy, and home to its Ceremonial head of state. The country of Mexico is separated from the United States of America by a border. Your assertion that these distinct independent countries  with their individual cultures are part of the USA does not apply.  just like you can't wrap your brain around the idea that devices that operate on the same principle do not become  different  inventions just because new features are added. 

 

 Anybody with any sense can see that the turn table on  the original phonograph and a later model  popularly known as a record player are virtually same  and are what hip hop deejays used to scratch on.  And Del's reply to your remark about who invented hip hop wherein he informed you that it was created not invented is an example of your not being able to speak on this subject with any more authority than anyone else.  

 

Your personality disorder makes it impossible for you to acknowledge these things because your delusions of infallibility are the glue that holds your fragile self esteem together. 

 

 lp-45_black__1_1024x1024_6e7b9000-9978-49b2-a331-7a2c22c81489_large.jpg?v=1498165563  s-l300.jpg

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7 hours ago, Cynique said:

What a pathetic attempt to obliterate your ignorance.  You are really stupid enough to think that all you have to do is contradict something and that makes it wrong.  And you did this without even bothering to offer facts or information that would prove you right. Haiti is a country located on the island of Hispaniola, east of Cuba in the Greater Antilles archipelago of the Caribbean Sea and covers 27,560 square kilometers of land and 190 square kilometers of water, making it the 149th largest nation in the world with a total area of 27,750 square kilometers. Jamaica is a beautiful island paradise located in the western Caribbean or the West Indies.Kingston is the capital city of Jamaica. It has a population of 937,700, and is located on a latitude of 18 and longitude of -76.79. Kingston is also the political center of Jamaica, which is considered a Constitutional Monarchy, and home to its Ceremonial head of state. The country of Mexico is separated from the United States of America by a border. Your assertion that these distinct independent countries  with their individual cultures are part of the USA does not apply.  just like you can't wrap your brain around the idea that devices that operate on the same principle do not become  different  inventions just because new features are added. 

 

 Anybody with any sense can see that the turn table on  the original phonograph and a later model  popularly known as a record player are virtually same  and are what hip hop deejays used to scratch on.  And Del's reply to your remark about who invented hip hop wherein he informed you that it was created not invented is an example of your not being able to speak on this subject with any more authority than anyone else.  

 

Your personality disorder makes it impossible for you to acknowledge these things because your delusions of infallibility are the glue that holds your fragile self esteem together. 

 

 lp-45_black__1_1024x1024_6e7b9000-9978-49b2-a331-7a2c22c81489_large.jpg?v=1498165563  s-l300.jpg

 

 

:rolleyes:Yep....spittin' image of each other, lol.

Why....I saw a DJ using the good ole phonograph on the right just a few days ago mixing it up at the club LOL.

I wonder did Edison "invent/create" the headphones most DJs use to go with it also?????


BTW....exactly WHEN did I say those nations were part of the "USA"?????
I don't recall saying that.
I said they were part of AMERICA, not the USA.






 

Mel

Where are you???????

You've been sitting mighty quiet over there......lol.

Why don't YOU go ahead and back up your girl Cynique????

You agree with her that those nations I mentioned are NOT part of America don't you?

Right?????

Go on ahead and show your girl some support.....lol.

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@Pioneer1Do you even know what a turn table is? The round device that is a component of a phonograph and that spins  around and  is where  a grooved  disc is placed on??   The two pictured are just alike.  They are  simply packaged differently. 

 

And just what is the relevance of your referring to Jamaica and Haiti and Mexico as part of the Americas?  What does this have to do with hip-hop  and rap originating in the city of New York in the United States of America, especially since nobody said the that these genres  originated elsewhere and were created by white people.  Why make Mel do your work for you?  You can't concoct  an answer yourself, just like you couldn't truthfully verbalize  whether you ever lived around Atlanta or Chicago, and couldn't find any reference to what you imagined i said about farmers and the depression  so you  just stall. What a transparent phony you are.  LOL 

 

BTW, headphones were invented waay before hip hop and rap came on the scene. 

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17 hours ago, Pioneer1 said:

Why don't YOU go ahead and back up your girl Cynique????

 

@Pioneer1 between @Cynique  handling you with facts and @Del beating you with first hand experience... do you really want me to mix it up with you too? Lol!  

 

But don’t think I didn’t see you trying to use the ole “continent”  defense  to support your argument. 🙄

Edited by Mel Hopkins
typos
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After reading several polls on Twitter, this week apparently a full- body wash is part of the african American culture.  It appears washing legs is optional for those of European descent.  Further, some from the medical profession agree  that vigorous leg washing removes the oils - hence our “ashy” legs.  Also “wash cloths” appear to be an African American item.  I must research the origin.  I know first hand whenever I traveled to Peru , Italy, Brazil and I think Argentina too I packed my own wash cloths because the hotels there only provided towels.  When I went into the “black” section of Lima I was able to stock up on wash cloths there. But none in Miraflores. I could only conclude that wash cloths are used in the African Diaspora 😄

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3 hours ago, Mel Hopkins said:

Also “wash cloths” appear to be an African American item.

 

Now this was news to me until a month ago. I had a couple stay with me for a few days last month. I laid out towels, one of those hands towels, and a wash cloth. The woman (Black) told me her husband (white) does not use a wash cloth. She said "white people don't use wash cloths." I thought that statements was odd, but I just put the wash cloth away and kept it moving.

 

I've been to a number of white countries and cities and was always provided a wash cloth. I've also stayed on white homes and was always provided wash cloths.

 

White people not using wash cloths sounds like an urban legend to me. 

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41 minutes ago, Troy said:

I've been to a number of white countries and cities and was always provided a wash cloth. I've also stayed on white homes and was always provided wash cloths.


I, I, I, .... LOL   Use your search engine - I just did and bing returned washcloths are rare in Europe...

Now I've never stayed with families or hostels when traveling the five continents ... but I'd imagined they would accommodate their guests with known amenities. 

However, for 8 years. I've only stayed at 4/5 star hotels in the five countries I've mentioned(I left out Belgium). AND they didn't have washcloths nor had a word that actually translated into washcloths.  Any LEGACY CARRIER  flight attendant will tell you bring your wash cloth if you use one.  

Note: German hotels had washcloths but they also have a U.S. Military bases so maybe the brothers/sisters hipped them lol...

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11 hours ago, Mel Hopkins said:

 

@Pioneer1 between @Cynique  handling you with facts and @Del beating you with first hand experience... do you really want me to mix it up with you too? Lol!  

 

But don’t think I didn’t see you trying to use the ole “continent”  defense  to support your argument. 🙄


Wow...lol.
I'm actually a bit surprised that you consider what she said factual.
I didn't actually expect for you to side with ME against Cynique on this or anything else....lol....but as much as you've been around I thought YOU knew better and would have just said nothing; but to consider it "fact"??

Del may have been relating his first hand experience but his experiences are irrelevant to his argument because none of those he's related have proven me wrong.
His telling me about what he was doing in the 70s has no bearing on who invented/create/made/whipped up/molded together/conjured up Hiphop and the elements of it like Break Dancing, MC'ing, and the Turntable which I maintain CAME FROM AfroAmericans and so far his so-called experiences haven't proven otherwise.




 

Troy


White people not using wash cloths sounds like an urban legend to me.


It's no urban legend, it's quite true for a large group of White people.

Having worked in an extended stay residence as well as a couple fitness centers I can attest to the fact that most White people don't.
But the strange thing is most White people in the South DO while most White people from the North and West Coast as well as from Europe don't.

I'm not sure why, but this is what I've noticed.

Another thing is most White women wash their hair in the shower while most Black women don't.....lol.

BTW....I started a thread with a question in it for you:

https://aalbc.com/tc/topic/5855-calling-professor-johnson-what-is-america/

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@Mel Hopkins I'm perfectly fine relating my personal experiences when giving my opinion. I was not trying to "prove" anything. At least three of us, including yourself, have presented anecdotes both supporting and not supporting the "white folks washcloth theory." While is may not rise to that of urban legend it is obviously not universally true, which is why I did not bother searching for it. 

 

 

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On 5/6/2019 at 9:22 PM, Pioneer1 said:

but they aren't TRULY indigenous to North Africa.

 

@Pioneer1 What!?

 

On 5/6/2019 at 9:22 PM, Pioneer1 said:

hey...like other so-called "Berber" tribes are actually a mixed group who are the descendants of the Caucasians

 

okay. Tecnically, when you say 'descendants of Caucasians'-- being the origin of Caucasians-- I say yes. But your definition of Caucasians is the problem.

On 5/7/2019 at 9:14 AM, Mel Hopkins said:

 As for the Tuareg tribes, their history reveals they are indigenous to Africa -  but this brings us back to appropriation . 

 

@Mel Hopkins Thank you!

On 5/7/2019 at 9:07 PM, Pioneer1 said:

When it becomes the dominant form of family structure in a given community (which it has in the AfroAmerican community) then it INDEED qualifies as being systemic.
The AfroAmerican community today is officially a MATRIARCHY in which the average or typical family is governed by the mother.

 

@Pioneer1 Interesting! You know, I think it is a mixture of both! I agree in what @Mel Hopkins is saying though, in that it is a matter of survival and to some extent has nothing to do with Matriarchy. 

 

However, the system you describe was started during slaver times and still is exploited today.

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16 hours ago, Pioneer1 said:

I'm actually a bit surprised that you consider what she said factual.
I didn't actually expect for you to side with ME against Cynique on this or anything else....lol....but as much as you've been around I thought YOU knew better and would have just said nothing; but to consider it "fact"??

 in lecturing Mel on this, why don't you get specific and give quotes that can be attributed to me as not being factual. Below is a direct quote from me:

"Haiti is a country located on the island of Hispaniola, east of Cuba in the Greater Antilles archipelago of the Caribbean Sea and covers 27,560 square kilometers of land and 190 square kilometers of water, making it the 149th largest nation in the world with a total area of 27,750 square kilometers. Jamaica is a beautiful island paradise located in the western Caribbean or the West Indies.Kingston is the capital city of Jamaica. It has a population of 937,700, and is located on a latitude of 18 and longitude of -76.79. Kingston is also the political center of Jamaica, which is considered a Constitutional Monarchy, and home to its Ceremonial head of state. The country of Mexico is separated from the United States of America by a border. Your assertion that these distinct independent countries  with their individual cultures are part of the USA does not apply. " 

 

The only non factual thing about that quote is that you didn't say that these countries were part of the United States of America. OK.   And in the following statement  below, I did refer to them as  being "Americas" - as in the broad sense of the word as it applies to continental America. 

On 5/10/2019 at 9:16 PM, Cynique said:

And just what is the relevance of your referring to Jamaica and Haiti and Mexico as part of the Americas?  What does this have to do with hip-hop  and rap originating in the city of New York in the United States of America, especially since nobody said the that these genres  originated elsewhere and were created by white people.

And,  i still question what whether Haiti, Jamaica and Mexico are a part of greater America or not has to do with the subject being discussed, a question you continue to dodge. 

 

16 hours ago, Pioneer1 said:

...telling me about what he was doing in the 70s has no bearing on who invented/create/made/whipped up/molded together/conjured up Hiphop and the elements of it like Break Dancing, MC'ing, and the Turntable which I maintain CAME FROM AfroAmericans and so far his so-called experiences haven't proven otherwise.


In the above statement about Del, your "maintaining" that the turntable came from AfroAmericans has not been proven right by you.   Using your twisted logic, Charlie Parker invented the saxophone because he played Be-Bop on it, or Scott Joplin invented the piano because he played Ragtime on it.   This whole debate is much ado about nothing because everybody agreed that Rap, Hip-Hop, Break-dancing and turntable MCing were originated by people of color.  You just had to pollute the discussion with your silly rejection of white Thomas Edison being the inventor of the turntable, and your ignorance about who invented headphones. And in the end, you haven't proved yourself anymore knowledgeable on this subject than anyone else.  At least Del's input is not second hand.  Nor was mine.  I grew up in a household where, dating back to the 1940s, my brother always had phonographs and records players  equipped with turn tables.  

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@Del  I followed your advice about looking things up on the interet and this is what i found about headphones.  Of course there are those who will dispute this  and claim they orginated with hip-hoppers and rappers.

220px-Brandes_Superior_Matched_Tone_c._1
 
Brandes radio headphones, circa 1920

Headphones originated from the telephone receiver earpiece, and were the only way to listen to electrical audio signals before amplifiers were developed. The first truly successful set was developed in 1910 by Nathaniel Baldwin, who made them by hand in his kitchen and sold them to the United States Navy

 

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After pondering the argument and upon further research I now realize I was indeed wrong.

I now realize that the phonograph in it's entirety wasn't the turn table but that the "turn table" was an earlier name of the COMPONENT of the phonograph that actually spins the record.

Although I knew the turn tables DJ's use was based on this and was a highly modified form of it, I didn't know it was actually called this BEFORE the Hiphop era.

However I still believe that Break Dancing and MC'ing (as we know it in Hiphop) was born from AfroAmerican youth.

But as it "turns" out.....lol....the turn table as it is named was clearly in existence.

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On 5/14/2019 at 11:34 AM, Pioneer1 said:

Although I knew the turn tables DJ's use was based on this and was a highly modified form of it, I didn't know it was actually called this BEFORE the Hiphop era.

The turn table,  a speaker,  an "arm" that a needle is screwed  into are what comprise a phonograph or record player.  They all work together to produce sound. They were not "highly modified" in the ensuing years.  There was no need to change them.  Whatever music or sound was produced was what changed, not the equipment.  CD and tapes were the different ways of producing sounds  

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8 hours ago, Cynique said:

The turn table,  a speaker,  an "arm" that a needle is screwed  into are what comprise a phonograph or record player.  They all work together to produce sound. They were not highly modified in the ensuing years.  There was no need to change them.  Whatever music or sound was produced was what changed, not the equipment.  CD and tapes were the different ways of producing sounds  


Why THANK YOU dear!

And I will BE SURE to recommend that this bit of knowledge you're sharing with us be included in the revised edition of:

Image result for book of useless information
 

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@Delano why are you are so anxious to point out when someone else is wrong.  Please tell me why what I wrote that was wrong or "kinda wrong."

 

Did you read the title of the book that Pioneer posted? Did you comprehend the statement I made in reaction to it?

 

Would you like to change you mind?

 

 

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22 hours ago, Cynique said:

Thank you.  Now stfu.


Listen, what's wrong with you?
Why you gotta act all ghetto and savage in Mel's' thread?

Now here we all are having an intelligent conversation about AfroAmerican culture and YOU had to ruin it.....lol.
Get your emotions together.

 

Anyway......

 

 


That delicious food made with cornbread is called  DRESSING instead of STUFFING is another part of AfroAmerican culture that it especially brought to my attention around the holidays.

And when I was a kid almost every Black family I knew around the entire city and even down South put GIZZARDS in their dressing.


 

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  • 2 months later...
Spoiler

 

On 5/1/2019 at 8:08 PM, Pioneer1 said:

But we don't really have an actual CULTURE.
In my opinion a TRUE culture means having your own language (not merely a corrupted form of English or a mere dialect of it which is what most AfroAmericans speak);


@Pioneer1   I agree! (damn!)

And there's an actual academic studies authored by an actual African scholar Ali A. Mazrui,  who also specialized in afro-linguistics that helped me to understand that this was the truest statement made on this board to date!!!  Most African-Americans come from West Africa where the  base language is bantu - which is the root of most swahili words - when swahili speaking cultures refer to the etymology of their words - they refer to bantu NOT latin...and etymology of those words form the culture to which many can refer to even though the british colonized a lot of Swahili-speaking people.   In fact, when we look to the seven principles of Kwanza it's important to look at the bantu etymology of the word AND NOT the AMERICAN translation. 

So, when I first thought of this topic I was trying to make a point. African-Americans  subscribe to the american culture.  It is our language that dictates our culture. Most of the time, without even noticing it -we reinforced the dominate culture - because we only know one language -american english


The things we do today would be virtually unrecognizable to a pre-colonized African.
 

 

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  the-africans-a-triple-heritage.jpg

Ali A. Mazrui, also wrote a companion book to his documentary "The Africans: a Triple Heritage" " Originally issued in connection with a PBS series, this volume by the Kenyan political scientist offers a stimulating introduction to Africa's peoples and problems. ""Throughout, Mazrui provocatively suggests remedies for Africa's malaise,'' PW wrote. (September) "
The Nature of the Continent | Program 1| Link is in the above comment
A Legacy of Lifestyles | Program 2 https://youtu.be/fByaUQppoGs

New Gods|Program 3 https://youtu.be/zyZHhMtgDzM
Tool of Exploitation | Program 4 |https://youtu.be/fNnN63hXLfo
New Conflicts|Program 5 | https://youtu.be/sAxOGImWWF4
In Search of Stability|Program 6 |https://youtu.be/zdhp5JeZkKY
A Garden of Eden In Decay|Program 7 | https://youtu.be/98DeZLWnkJg
A Clash of Cultures|Program 8 |https://youtu.be/B3AGGHooJ6I
Global Africa | Program 9 | https://youtu.be/Nf25hZe1ZhE

 

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Mel
 

I agree! (damn!)

 

 Image result for black miss america being crowned

 

 

Lol....and that's why I say we should crown you as new 1st Lady of AALBC!
 


Another problem with Swahili is it's heavily influenced by Arabic since it was helped put together by them for the purposes of trading between various indigenous groups.

Infact, even if you look at the term for Kwanzaa's 7 principles...Ngooso Saba....that word "saba" isn't African but actually Arabic or atleast Semitic in origin.

Maulana Karinga put it together but the name "Maulana" is an Arabic name as well!

And the candle lighting reminds me of Hannukah.


But I still give propers to Karinga for trying to trying to give us somewhat of a culture with our own holidays and festive rituals.

 


It is our language that dictates our culture.


Ofcourse.
Language and words set the framework of the mind.
That's why learning a new languages often FORCES a person to think from an entirely different perspective and often times changes their orientation on life.

I remember some years ago when I was working in a restaurant and was picking up a little Espanol from some of my co-workers I would learn the words "I am hungry" in Espanol and say that exactly but it made no sense to them. In their culture they don't say "I AM hungry" instead they say "I HAVE hunger".
And when I thought about it,  it made more sense because it's silly to say you ARE hungry as if you're calling yourself "hungry" when it's actually a feeling you have.

One of the problems with us attempting to get our own language is we would have to practically invent it from scratch because there is no single dominant West African ethnic group that we could legitimately latch on too. Plus being here in the West, I believe most West African languages are too limited in their vocabulary for us to adopt without being FORCED to use English or Spanish words to compensate.

Looks like Black linguistic scholars have quite a project waiting for them if they want it.....lol.
It may take decades to outline and launch a viable and unique AfroAmerican language.

 

 

 

 

 

Most of the time, without even noticing it -we reinforced the dominate culture - because we only know one language -american english


And the fact that most of us only only know American English also has negative financial repercussions.

If you notice, most of the people of color who are financially successful in the United States whether they are Koreans, Chinese, Nigerians, Haitians, Cubans, Ethiopians, ect......they all speak languages OTHER than just English.

Like I said earlier, speaking more than one language FORCES your brain to think in different modes but it ALSO allows you to talk and plan business and other economic moves amongst eachother without worrying about White people eave's dropping in and stealing your ideas or trying to thwart your business plans.

If you notice out in public, AfroAmericans can be talking and it doesn't bother them at all but Caucasians tend to get ANGRY and nervous as hell when Africans and other people of color start speaking in a foreign language around them!


They start looking around, sighing, rolling their eyes, ect......because they can't figure out what those people are up to, lol.

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Isn't there a Black Aesthetic that transcends time and place?Which comes across both verbally and non verbally. Have you seen non Black people pull off African or even Afro American clothing.

Same thing with cadence slang and tonality in speech. Does Wesley Snipes seem more Black than Denzel Washington. Meek Mill versus Drake.

I am not certain where I would put Eminem. He doesn't try and sound black but he loves hip hop in a way that Jay Z doesn't. Eminem loves hip hop Jay Z loves hustling. In. my opinion 

 

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5 hours ago, Delano said:

Isn't there a Black Aesthetic that transcends time and place?

 

@Delano  I shared this concept with my Nigerian ( Igbo) friend - because he displays this rhythm, tempo and cadence in all his creative endeavors.  

He mentioned I have it too.  I’ve noticed it others - who like Slim Shady, do not  share  our phenotypic traits.  So, these traits appear to be genetic but not limited to ethnicity. 

 

So, do you include genetic traits in your definition of culture?   If so, would this mean African-American culture would be a misnomer?  

 

Would it be more inclusive to say - cultural traits found predominately in the African-American ethnic group.  

 

This is what the documentary  video, I posted “The Africans - Three Heritages” talks about too! 

11 hours ago, Pioneer1 said:

Lol....and that's why I say we should crown you as new 1st Lady of AALBC!

 

😂😂😂. @Pioneer1 I keep telling you that’s the main reason I can’t be moderator!  Moderators are supposed to provoke NOT agree!  

11 hours ago, Pioneer1 said:

If you notice out in public, AfroAmericans can be talking and it doesn't bother them at all but Caucasians tend to get ANGRY and nervous as hell when Africans and other people of color start speaking in a foreign language around them!

 

Sadly, history has shown this to be true. Whenever a group is captured and colonized the first thing outlawed is language. 

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5 hours ago, Wosey said:

Mel Hopkins it is called the Yoruba language, it has several dialects but there is a universally accepted form. It is currently spoken by approximately 80 million individuals in the world with 56 million native speakers.



Hello and welcome to the site.

I'm curious......
Have you been initiated in or do you practice the IFA belief system of West Africa?

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Hello Piooneer1,

 

Thanks for welcoming me. Unfortunately i don't practice the IFA belief system. IFA system  is very much Yoruba. Yorubaland was impacted by colonialism. I grew up with Christianity. I am currently researching and reading on role missionaries played in colonization of Africa  and I wonder, is christianity and colonialism inseparable? Is it a case of;

 

"Take their language and take their gods and you have taken their future".

 

I am beginning to read about Yoruba deities and mythology and it is fascinating!

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16 hours ago, Delano said:

which episode a do you mean? 

Also i am not knowledgeable enough to have a strong position. Anthropology and genetics is not my area of knowledge. 

@Delano  Gotcha! And I think that's the truth for most of us. I think your position should also be considered too. Often we believe others are appropriating the African american culture because we expect people too look a certain way  - but who can dictate who belongs to the culture and who does not. 

On 8/5/2019 at 1:26 PM, Mel Hopkins said:

the-africans-a-triple-heritage.jpg

Ali A. Mazrui, also wrote a companion book to his documentary "The Africans: a Triple Heritage" " Originally issued in connection with a PBS series, this volume by the Kenyan political scientist offers a stimulating introduction to Africa's peoples and problems. ""Throughout, Mazrui provocatively suggests remedies for Africa's malaise,'' PW wrote. (September) "
The Nature of the Continent | Program 1| Link is in the above comment
A Legacy of Lifestyles | Program 2 https://youtu.be/fByaUQppoGs

New Gods|Program 3 https://youtu.be/zyZHhMtgDzM
Tool of Exploitation | Program 4 |https://youtu.be/fNnN63hXLfo
New Conflicts|Program 5 | https://youtu.be/sAxOGImWWF4
In Search of Stability|Program 6 |https://youtu.be/zdhp5JeZkKY
A Garden of Eden In Decay|Program 7 | https://youtu.be/98DeZLWnkJg
A Clash of Cultures|Program 8 |https://youtu.be/B3AGGHooJ6I
Global Africa | Program 9 | https://youtu.be/Nf25hZe1ZhE

 

 

@Delano  this is documentary I referencing.

 

On 8/6/2019 at 2:07 PM, Wosey said:

Mel Hopkins it is called the Yoruba language, it has several dialects but there is a universally accepted form. It is currently spoken by approximately 80 million individuals in the world with 56 million native speakers.

@Wosey, thank you.  Are you a native speaker? what is the name of the universally accepted dialect?  

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17 hours ago, Mel Hopkins said:

Often we believe others are appropriating the African american culture because we expect people too look a certain way  - but who can dictate who belongs to the culture and who does not. 

Sounds like a version of Blacker than Thou

 

This paper attempts to place the African immigrant and the African American in the context of their conditions in the United States. It addresses the issue of Americanization and the development of multiple identities that is fundamental to the contestation of “Blackness” in the United States. More importantly, the study discusses resource allocation and appropriation as critical to understanding the schisms between the African immigrant and the African American, focusing especially on how the conflict and tension potentially benefits other racial categories. It highlights the fact that conflict and tension between both groups result directly from the dominant White racial framing, wherein powerless groups unable to effectively challenge the forces that oppress them, attack themselves or people like themselves. To explain this complex interaction between Whites, African immigrants, and African Americans, this paper develops the theory of manipulative deflection, the central tenet of which is the subjective experience of deprivation that diminishes the construction of a holistic Black identity and produces confusion and conflict among Blacks in the United States.

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Well @Maurice when you are ready to buy The Fire This Time, consider buying it through AALBC.

 

Did add Mazrui's books to the site (18 I could find) to AALBC including The Africans: A Triple Heritage.  

 

I watched most of the 1st episode last night.  It was rather slow moving (maybe I was just tired). He did not seems to be aware that Africans actually traveled across the ocean to the Americas before Columbus, based upon the way he described the African's relationship with the ocean.  This would be surprising since The work of Leo Weiner and Ivan Van Sertima was available when the documentary was made.

 

Click for a larger image of The Africans: A Triple Heritage

The Africans: A Triple Heritage
by Ali Mazrui

Publication Date: 
List Price: $24.95 (store prices may vary)
Format: Hardcover
Classification: Nonfiction
Page Count: 336
ISBN13: 9780316552004
Imprint: Little, Brown and Company
Publisher: Hachette Book Group
Parent Company: Hachette Livre

 

Book Description:

Looks at the history, geography, and culture of Africa, assesses native, Arab, and Western influences, and discusses sports, religion, government, and social issues in Africa

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No, not really. It is not cost effective for me to drop ship a small quantity of books internationally. 

 

However, if it is a book I ship directly, that is otherwise unavailable to you, then it might be worthwhile. I'd need your address and name of the book (for the weight).  Was there a specific title you had in mind?

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At some point I'm gonna drop all my affiliate links and take direct orders for all books, in print, shown on the site. It will be much easier to order books than it is now. My goal is to have this setup in less than a year.

 

Until then you'll have to tell whichs books you want (ISBN preferred), and then i can give you a quote.

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