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Help Us Select Our August Book

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Pick a book for our Reading listWhat book would you like to read and discuss?

 

We have decided to open up the process of selecting the books on a reading list to readers, authors, educators, publishers, or anyone who has an interest in discussing a book on AALBC.

 

We are looking for suggestions for our August reading list here.  The only criteria is that the book be; written by, or about, Black people; and it should be in print and available for purchase.  All genres in fiction and nonfiction are acceptable.

 

The book does not need to be on AALBC.com. If the chosen book is not on AALBC.com, it will be added.

 

Simply reply to this post to suggest a book for August. When you suggest a book tell us why you are suggesting it; that will help us (myself and the club's moderator Tony Lindsay) chose a book from the titles suggested.

 

The August book will be selected from books suggested here.

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My suggestion for the August Book would be "Blissfield" by Heather Neff.  This book is a coming-of-age tale of a girl named Bethany who arrives in Blissfield, NC to live with her grandmother and befriends two young misfits in the town named Gideon and Nina Price.  All three of them have been traumatized by their upbringing and form a bond that is shaken to the core by events that happen in the book, as they grow into adulthood

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Greetings all, I read To Funk and Die in LA, and what a different read. I had never read a Nelson George novel, and I was not expecting the musical history lessons. The novel being written in third person also surprised me. The protagonist, D Hunter, was faced with several challenges and for the most part he pushed through. I enjoyed the LA lifestyle the text offered, and much like D, I would be a fish out of water in LA, but as the protagonist adjusted in the story so did I in the read. It was enjoyable meeting so many culturally different characters. The racial tension present in text was not expected, but one has to assume a city as diverse as LA must have different racial facets beyond the typical Black and white drama.  I was also surprised by D Hunter’s HIV status and was impressed by how George worked into the plot with acceptance and concern. Dr. Funk’s creative stability even within his mental health issues was another shocker for me, but completely believable considering how creative genius exist. The only problem with the story was the delaying of the mystery, it was not always upfront for the protagonist, but on the other hand I really enjoyed the family and friends D related to daily. It was a good read and I would read another D Hunter mystery.     

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