Jump to content

A Little Depressed The Past Couple Days


Recommended Posts

Troy

I wouldn't say "white people" in general but the White Establishment.....the wealthy influencial group of Caucasians who control much of this society.....are using multiple methods INCLUDING funding BLM to promote HOMO (not hemo which has to do with blood) philia in the AfroAmerican community and make it more acceptable to the masses.

I'm not sure if they are funding Yvette for this or even funding her at all, but they ARE funding BLM for this very reason.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 90
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Welcome back .

Troy Dude, what impact has BLM had on your life, or the life of anyone you know? BLM's pro-homophilia platform negatively impacts the social status of AfroAmericans in general and makes us loo

I wish I could disagree with this, but I cannot. I will qualify my position with the fact that black people succeeded in building our own cities in the 1910s and 1920s, only for white people to destro

Here is a related anecdote:

 

Read the review about one of the Black Lives Matters principals, Patrisse Khan-Cullors, When They Call You a Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter Memoir. The late Kam Williams wrote the review. The author of the book, a sister I though I was cool with emailed me  vigorously trashing the review. There is a video on the page that i arranged for the author to appear in but she ghosted me which was a pretty shitty thing to do.

 

Now the review was Kam's assessment, was the review worth burning a bridge with AALBC? What did Kam do wrong mention Patrice's dysfunctional upbringing or her Homosexuality? 

 

While I don't think the oligarchy is using homosexuality to destroy the Black community, the current climate of political correctness and hypersensitivity is hurting us. 

 

I have no issue with BLM, but their prominence is a function of and largely a creation of media coverage.  Since we don't control media, we don't control who represents Black the mainstream.

 

The are important groups in NYC, for example, doing real work in the community. You will rarely learn about them on network TV. They don't have social media folks sending tweets or posting on Instgram -- they doing real work and don't need retweets.

 

"A group's prominence on social media is inversely proportional to it's relevance to our people."

 

Without twitter BLM would never have emerged. As far as it's relevance lets judge that in another decade after the twittersphere (if it still exists) has moved on to the next shiny thing.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Troy

"Political correctess" is a tool that many racist Caucasians are now using to harass and terrorize AfroAmericans.

Originally political correctness was a code of conduct meant to protect AfroAmericans and women from racist and sexist jokes and slurs endured in the work place and society in general from White males. Now that homophiles, biophiles, and transexuals have been added to the list of "protected groups" racists Caucasians monitor the speech and behavior of AfroAmericans and seize upon any opportunity to point the finger and accuse them of political incorrectness, insensitivity, sexism, homophobia, and even reverse racism.

A good example is when Ginuwine refused to kiss a man and was called a homophobe and harassed for it:

https://www.bet.com/music/2018/01/08/ginuwine-big-brother-celebrity-trans-woman-twitter-debate.html

 

 



While I don't think the oligarchy is using homosexuality to destroy the Black community,


Ofcourse they're not trying to destroy it....because they know they can't, lol.
But they are trying to DESTABLIZE it (even further) by confusing the roles and expectations of males and females thus pitting them against eachother and lowering the birth/population rate. BLM is just one of their tools for this.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Dude, what impact has BLM had on your life, or the life of anyone you know? Do you think anyone would be made gay by following them on Twitter?

 

BLM does give white corporations the ability to appear "woke," by providing  BLM a platform. The "alphabet people" as you describe them are in now.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Troy

Dude, what impact has BLM had on your life, or the life of anyone you know?


BLM's pro-homophilia platform negatively impacts the social status of AfroAmericans in general and makes us look even more immoral and broken.

You're looking at things from a typical U.S. INDIVIDUALISTIC mentality.
You say what BLM does and what gays do have nothing to do with you and little impact on your life....which is the way it SHOULD be....but not the way it IS.

When people from other nations and cultures (nations and cultures that are far more collectivist than ours) come to the United States or watch the politics of this nation from abroad and they see AfroAmericans engaged in or associated with crime, violence, mass incarceration, and now homophile and pedophile behavior....it justifies the mistreatment in their minds.
If they see some acting that way...they assume ALL act that way.

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 5 weeks later...
On 11/3/2019 at 12:37 PM, Kareem said:

Hey @Chevdove I know I'm late responding to all this. But this point is very real. @Pioneer1 pointed out how Nipsey Hussle is the Tupac Shakur for Millennials. Sounds about right. I never have and never will understand the obsession with Tupac by black Americans. He's just a typical thug. What has he done to uplift, educate, motivate, etc.? NOTHING. Again, I know nothing about Hustle. But I believe what Pioneer said because it makes sense.

 

I do not understand the hype about Tupac, either, and I did listen to some of Nipsey's music and understand his platform, therefore, I think the two are absolutely different.

Nipsey me the leader of Eritrea, and was about to do some kind of business venture. He also began to promote STEM for young black kids and etc.

His music was intense for me, but, I understand his platform.

Nipsey was definitely political but not sure about Tupac.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/20/2019 at 7:09 PM, Pioneer1 said:

When people from other nations and cultures (nations and cultures that are far more collectivist than ours) come to the United States or watch the politics of this nation from abroad and they see AfroAmericans engaged in or associated with crime, violence, mass incarceration, and now homophile and pedophile behavior....it justifies the mistreatment in their minds.
If they see some acting that way...they assume ALL act that way.

 

Man this is hyperbolic.  Thinking people know better than to prejudge an entire group of people based upon the behavior of a few individuals.  Besides the most dysfunction behavior, as you define it, is engaged in by white men.  There is a white gay man who is a front running for POTUS. The catholic Church, which is run by white men, is riddled with pedophiles.

 

Surely, the people from abroad that you say are judging us can see a stark difference between President Obama and 45.  Why would they not use this as an example by which to judge Black people -- using your analogy?

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/20/2019 at 3:39 AM, Chevdove said:

Nipsey me the leader of Eritrea, and was about to do some kind of business venture. He also began to promote STEM for young black kids and etc.

His music was intense for me, but, I understand his platform.

 

Your post made me look into Nipsey Hussle a little more. I came across an interview with him on the Breakfast Club. He talked about the book/movie "The Spook Who Sat By The Door." He talked about having the power to mobilize a lot of black people. It was similar to that line in the Malcolm X movie when the cop said "No man should have that much power."

 

Anyway, Hussle was dead a month or two later. A good friend of mine believes that was the reason he was killed. I also saw that Hussle was in a long-term relationship with a beautiful black woman and mother of one of his children named Lauren London. Never heard of her either until a few days ago. But that alone differentiates Hussle from Tupac. I don't believe a black man can be a true leader of black people without a black woman at his side. That's why Malcolm (and Betty), Medgar (and Myrlie), and MLK (Coretta) were so influential and powerful. I've grown more skeptical of Nelson Mandela over the years. But he and Winnie were also very powerful. Who is/was a powerful, influential black couple now? The Obamas work for white liberals. Jay-Z and Beyonce are just celebrities looking out for themselves. It just doesn't exist anymore.

 

I just wonder why I never heard of Hussle until he was dead? I don't listen to hip-hop anymore as most of it since the early 1990s is garbage. But if he as doing good thing, I'd think he'd be on my radar.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Kareem said:

But if he as doing good thing, I'd think he'd be on my radar.

 

Well I guess it depends on where you get your information. I never heard of Nispey before he died either, but there are many Black people doing great things. their stories don't make mainstream media and most aren't goifing around on Twitter.

 

This is one reason the lost of black owned newspapers and magazines have been so devastating.

 

Our culture is obsessed with celebrity. It is a sickness...

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/22/2019 at 9:10 PM, Kareem said:

I just wonder why I never heard of Hussle until he was dead? I don't listen to hip-hop anymore as most of it since the early 1990s is garbage. But if he as doing good thing, I'd think he'd be on my radar.

 

@Kareem Me too. I never heard of him until he was dead! But, I feel that his movement was on point.

Although he died young, I feel that his life was very complete. 

He had a hard life, a high school drop out and then he became a millionaire.

He really focused on 'cutting out the middle man' in finances and etc.

 

 

On 12/22/2019 at 9:10 PM, Kareem said:

Your post made me look into Nipsey Hussle a little more. I came across an interview with him on the Breakfast Club. He talked about the book/movie "The Spook Who Sat By The Door." He talked about having the power to mobilize a lot of black people. It was similar to that line in the Malcolm X movie when the cop said "No man should have that much power."

 

Anyway, Hussle was dead a month or two later. A good friend of mine believes that was the reason he was killed.

 

Oh yes. It would not surprise me at all. I think I heard that he was suppose to have a meeting with the LA police force about stopping gang violence the day before he was killed.

And, I hope Laura London will be comforted. Yes, that was another one of Nipsey's focus. He campainged hard, even in his music about Black relationships!

 

 

 

 

On 12/23/2019 at 12:13 AM, Troy said:

This is one reason the lost of black owned newspapers and magazines have been so devastating.

 

@Troy I agree. It has been devastating.

 

On 12/23/2019 at 12:13 AM, Troy said:

Our culture is obsessed with celebrity. It is a sickness...

 

We are flooded with so much celebrity 'this and that'!

NOw, today we also have so many Black celebrities too, and at first, say yes--it's about time, but then, this too, is

a distraction in some ways. It takes away from issues that I feel we need to address but are not.

I get so distracted myself, but nevertheless, I still try to limit myself.

 

In the very nature of this thread, if I constantly read celebrity news and get caught up into media hype, it can get down right depressing.

Instead of being 'the focus' in every day day-to-day things going on around my own surroundings, I sometimes find myself looking at someone

elses' life too long, and then lose focus my own human presence. It's sickening.

I wish there were community venues, Black people affairs, that were promoted nearby, then I would have to stop watching media 

and go and attend and be around people! 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Troy

Man this is hyperbolic. Thinking people know better than to prejudge an entire group of people based upon the behavior of a few individuals. Besides the most dysfunction behavior, as you define it, is engaged in by white men.


This isn't hyperbole, it's a sociological fact that most people who come from COLLECTIVIST societies tend to judge groups by the INDIVIDUALS they meet.

If you don't understand this concept, how do you think the world feels about America with TRUMP as the head of it?
How did you think the world felt about America with BUSH as the head 15 years ago?

People in other countries were constantly asking what was wrong with the AMERICAN PEOPLE that they would allow such an idiot to become their leader.

AfroAmericans must shake off this extreme "individualism" they learned from Caucasians and stop being so self-centered and concerned ONLY with matters that concern us personally.
We need to seriously concern ourselves with how OTHER people think, especially when they think of us.

I used to think it was wrong to judge an entire group based on the behavior of just a few people but the older I got the more I began to understand why this is done.

When people from other nations come to America and see AfroAmerican men hanging around on the street begging for dope money, older people being disrespected in the neighborhoods, or grown men walking around with blonde hair and limp wrists acting all sissified and feminine in a flamboyant and comical manner they not only judge THOSE INDIVIDUAL AfroAmericans who are behaving in such a disgraceful manner but they also make judgements about AfroAmericans as a whole!

Wanna know why?

Because they figured if AfroAmericans as a group had any honor and pride the majority of them wouldn't ALLOW a handful to make fools of themselves in public and disgrace the majority!

An the individual is a reflection of the whole to various degrees.

Some of the shit that goes on in Black neighborhoods would NEVER go on in East Asian or Arab communities in America because these communities tend to have so much of a code among themselves that if just ONE person attempted to engage in such behavior every man who sees it would feel OBLIGATED to confront the offenders on sight!
No need to have peace rallies and meetings, every man who sees it will immediately TAKE ACTION.

Go to Korean town in Los Angeles and get on the bus and all of the young Koreans know they BETTER get up and let an elder Korean sit down first and if they don't all the other Koreans who see it will give them a mean look, say something, and then CONFRONT them over it!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...