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I Think Ish is right about the Precious Film

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New York Times

Fade to White

By ISHMAEL REED

Published: February 4, 2010

The blacks who are enraged by “Precious” have probably figured out that this film wasn’t meant for them. It was the enthusiastic response from white audiences and critics that culminated in the film being nominated for six Oscars by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, an outfit whose 43 governors are all white and whose membership in terms of diversity is about 40 years behind Mississippi. In fact, the director, Lee Daniels,said that the honor would bring even more “middle-class white Americans” to his film.

Ishmael Reed on AALBC.com

http://aalbc.com/authors/ishmael.htm

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New York Times

Fade to White

By ISHMAEL REED

Published: February 4, 2010

The blacks who are enraged by “Precious” have probably figured out that this film wasn’t meant for them. It was the enthusiastic response from white audiences and critics that culminated in the film being nominated for six Oscars by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, an outfit whose 43 governors are all white and whose membership in terms of diversity is about 40 years behind Mississippi. In fact, the director, Lee Daniels,said that the honor would bring even more “middle-class white Americans” to his film.

Ishmael Reed on AALBC.com

http://aalbc.com/authors/ishmael.htm

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"Precious" is certainly tailor-made for Whites who like nothing better than to seize an opportunity to feel good about themselves by sympathizing with authentic down-and-out black characters. What better way for them to reinforce their feelings of superiority than to see Blacks portrayed as the victims of their own immorality,

This relates to why white celebs are all out there raising money for Haitians who are doomed by the misfortune that seems to be their lot in life - why white do-gooders flocked to this hell hole, playing healers to the sick and saviors to orphans. After all, God has ordained them to cure the ills of the world because people like Haitians are incapable of helping themselves! Charity is, of course, a commendable pursuit, but the other side of this coin is condescention. Yes, I know, these people are sincere and caring. They never met a cause they weren't ready, at the drop of a hat, to lavish their caring sincerity on.

As for "Precious", it's not like this movie will enlighten white audiences. What it does is confirm what they already suspect. While black folks exude a "so what else is new" attitude after seeing this film, white people upon viewing it want it to be rewarded for its true grit. Oprah praises it and so should everybody else.

But the joke is on them, and it takes the form of Gaby's TV interviews, as there she sits, chirping away in full "valley girl" mode, in effect, mocking her patronizers. In the meantime, her sidekick Monique does the best acting job of her career by humoring the Hollywood powers-that-be into thinking that what she was doing on screen was acting. :lol:

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New York Times

Fade to White

By ISHMAEL REED

Published: February 4, 2010

The blacks who are enraged by “Precious” have probably figured out that this film wasn’t meant for them. It was the enthusiastic response from white audiences and critics that culminated in the film being nominated for six Oscars by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, an outfit whose 43 governors are all white and whose membership in terms of diversity is about 40 years behind Mississippi. In fact, the director, Lee Daniels,said that the honor would bring even more “middle-class white Americans” to his film.

Ishmael Reed on AALBC.com

http://aalbc.com/authors/ishmael.htm

Well Troy, to Ismael's Fade to White, I say Bull Shit! We've done this before so I'll move on.

Ismael is very deep. I read ALL of the AALBC link. Man, that was long! This caught my eye.....

"RM: It seems to me that black writers have to be marketed into neat little categories to sell books, and if you're not able to fit into any of these slots, then you have a problem"

There was a load of wisdom in that interview.

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Hello All,

I disagree with the Ishmael! I am so SICK of this argument. They used it 30 some odd years ago with The Color Purple! Frankly, Reed needs to get over it! I don't see how Precious is saying anything more to white people than it said to me as a black man. Any damn movie that ain't showing the black man as a minor Superman they take offense. There use to be they was upset because white folks always wanted to depict the mournful, caring black mother on the screen when not all of that was the least bit true. Now, Precious destroyed that stereotype and you all still ain't happy. I guess Reed would be more satisfied showing Precious's daddy having a bunch of kids and not supporting them or raising them or even knowing who they are, because that much is true! No, Sidney Poitier should lose 40 years and start remaking his old movies again. Man, pick a side and stay with it.

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I don't think current complaints about "Precious" have to do with the castration of black men, per se. What many people are disturbed about is how the motion picture establishment always chooses to reward films and roles that depict the most depraved aspects of black life, as exemplified by the performances Halle Berry and Denzel Washington were recognized for.

Sandra Bullock, for instance, is up for an Oscar for her portrayal of a magnanimous white woman, and Meryl Streep for her impersonation of an iconic gormet chef. The other white female nominees include actresses who played sympathetic and supportive mates to their woegotten men. Contrast this with Monique and Gaby's characters.

I don't agree that the flak over "Precious" is a matter of certain Blacks whining. It's just a case of them shaking their heads about a familiar pattern.

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"Precious" is certainly tailor-made for Whites who like nothing better than to seize an opportunity to feel good about themselves by sympathizing with authentic down-and-out black characters. What better way for them to reinforce their feelings of superiority than to see Blacks portrayed as the victims of their own immorality,

This relates to why white celebs are all out there raising money for Haitians who are doomed by the misfortune that seems to be their lot in life - why white do-gooders flocked to this hell hole, playing healers to the sick and saviors to orphans. After all, God has ordained them to cure the ills of the world because people like Haitians are incapable of helping themselves! Charity is, of course, a commendable pursuit, but the other side of this coin is condescention. Yes, I know, these people are sincere and caring. They never met a cause they weren't ready, at the drop of a hat, to lavish their caring sincerity on.

As for "Precious", it's not like this movie will enlighten white audiences. What it does is confirm what they already suspect. While black folks exude a "so what else is new" attitude after seeing this film, white people upon viewing it want it to be rewarded for its true grit. Oprah praises it and so should everybody else.

But the joke is on them, and it takes the form of Gaby's TV interviews, as there she sits, chirping away in full "valley girl" mode, in effect, mocking her patronizers. In the meantime, her sidekick Monique does the best acting job of her career by humoring the Hollywood powers-that-be into thinking that what she was doing on screen was acting. :lol:

Wow, interesting and thought provoking and you might have hit on something there. I guess there are black directors and writers who will make films specifically for whites that protrays other blacks in the worse possible situations to reinforce the white society's feelings of superiority. As far as I am concerned the movie "Good Hair" does the same thing, maybe even worse.

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As usual the lady from The great prairie state of Illinois speaks with wisdom and clarity.

When is this moive gonna be on Netfix I anxious to see if and create a well informed decision.

Capree, I'd be very surprised to learn if white folks bother to go see Good Hair in meaningful numbers. Shoot it was tough enough getting Blakc folks to show up. I watched it on DVD, but it did not hold my interest enough for me to watch it to the end...

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Wow, interesting and thought provoking and you might have hit on something there. I guess there are black directors and writers who will make films specifically for whites that protrays other blacks in the worse possible situations to reinforce the white society's feelings of superiority. As far as I am concerned the movie "Good Hair" does the same thing, maybe even worse.

OMG!!!! This is embarrassingly ridiculous. Black directors make movies they feel are relevant to their personal agendas and those of their targeted audience (which is generally black). White people have nothing to do with it. Negroes need to move past their paranoiac race fantasies of persecution and see reality for it is. The Negroes who were upset about Chris Rocks movie were embarrassed that non-whites would now know the astringent details of the difficulty of grooming and managing black hair (as if they didn’t already know!). Outside of the deep rooted shame and self loathing of their natural hair, there is no sane reason for Negroes to protest such a simple movie. I personally heard two black women bitterly complain the Rock had “exposed black women’s secrets” (I know…I know, as pathetic as that sounds -I actually heard them say it!).

Same can be said for the movie Precious. It was a hard core gritty story about a young black woman’s tragic life. All the trappings and characters in the movie are real and black America is filled with legions of Negroes who are carbon copies of every single character in this movie. So why all the histrionics and temper tantrums about situations, behavior and characters that are pandemic in black America? Makes no sense…….

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In the world of entertainment, it does make sense that an industry controlled by white moguls doesn't hesitate to exploit race. A lot of politics is involved in the "bestowing-of-awards" process. It's not always about good performances but about whose turn it is.

Taking this a step further, white Hollywood always seizes an opportunity to pat itself on the back, and nominating pictures about Blacks for Oscars will placate those who might accuse the industry of being racist. Blacks who point out that the pictures and roles singled out for recognition are always ones about the down side of black life, have a point. Aestheticism is Tinseltown is always tainted by cynicism. <_<

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. Black directors make movies they feel are relevant to their personal agendas and those of their targeted audience (which is generally black). White people have nothing to do with it.

(With that comment you reveal that you don't know a damn thing about America, the movie business, black directors or filmmaking.

Why am I not surprised.

You got in there crying and snotting over this sad story and now you can't even see straight enough to tell it like it is. Admit it. It's all emotional.

You like the movie. Lots of black people have questions about it. Maybe you're right. Maybe THEY are. Get over it.

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In the world of entertainment, it does make sense that an industry controlled by white moguls doesn't hesitate to exploit race. A lot of politics is involved in the "bestowing-of-awards" process. It's not always about good performances but about whose turn it is.

Taking this a step further, white Hollywood always seizes an opportunity to pat itself on the back, and nominating pictures about Blacks for Oscars will placate those who might accuse the industry of being racist. Blacks who point out that the pictures and roles singled out for recognition are always ones about the down side of black life, have a point. Aestheticism is Tinseltown is always tainted by cynicism. <_<

(Cynique, in my absence you have become a clear and cogent critic and commentator.

I wonder how long it will take me to get you back out to lunch again? Hmmmm. What will I have to do?? Hmmmm...

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