Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Chevdove

Black Santa Prank

Recommended Posts

 

Black Santa Prank

 

I hope I don't offend anyone, but if so, please let me know so I can make amends here.

A few months back, my son showed me this youtube, and because, on a more sober note, I 

am sharing a deep message about the true oppressions of this ancient history about Ole Saint Nick, and

because these 'comic relief' made me laugh, I thought it okay to share a little light hearted youtube

about this spin off of 'Black Santa'-- or maybe Brown Santa, or maybe even White Santa...

 

My son showed me this youtube in the parking lot while getting fuel and I thought it was so hilarious,

I laughed till I cried. And I just ran across another one I also thought was pretty funny. So here they are:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lol, this will probably be a Buzz Kill but........

That second vido of the "Black Santa" ((shakes head))

There's a number of destructive and dangerous stereotypes in it that I THOUGHT were behind us but it seems that the young brother who is staring in it and helped to produce it is trying to bring back and promote.

Let's unpack this, shall we.........

 

 


First of all, faaaar more Caucasian men (Santas and priests included) drink liquor than Black men. Infact, they INVENTED it so why did that scene have to involve the Black Santa drinking liquor out of a flask?

Is the producer of this video trying to incinuate that drinking liquor is a "Black" thing?


Secondly, just like liquor there are more Caucasian men with guns too.
Infact, in America there is a " gun culture".
So why they got the Black Santa packing heat playing off the stereotype of Black males being gun toting thugs.


Third, why are they playing off and joking on the stereotype of Black males being thieves and burgulars?



Now, some of you say,
"Oh lighten up Pioneer it's just joking and having fun....they aren't serious. Even the Black man in the video is cool with it!
You're seeing more into it than there really is!".


 

Well, if they aren't serious and just having fun playing off of stereotypes then....


-Why didn't they show "Black Santa" with a bunch of naked women sitting on his lap promoting the stereotype that Black men are sexually promiscuous and have a bunch of "hoes"?
That IS a stereotype of Black men, wonder why THAT isn't being promoted much?

-Why didn't they show a Black Santa clause with a massive buldge in pants promoting the myth that Black men have large penises?
That TOO is a stereotype of Black men, but they don't want to promote THAT stereotype.
They want to hide and bury THAT steretype....lol.

Or what about showing the "Black Santa" shooting hoops on the basketball court?
Black men being athletic and good at basketball is a stereotype too!

If you pay attention to the television and music industry and what's been promoted for the past 40 years or so...you'll notice the type of stereotypes of Black males that are promoted are carefully chosen.

It reminds me of the Eddie Murphy Saturday Night Live skits where he uses his funny as hell talent to further re-enforce negative stereotypes of Black men but not the positive ones.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I basically agree @Pioneer1. I did not find the first video very funny because it used worn out stereo typical Black tropes and the acting acting was bad. For that reason i did not watch the second video.

 

It is why i don't find Madea film very funny. If you've seen on you've seen them all. But i get why owople find this stuff funny, so I dont try to kill anyone's "buzz."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah that's a no from me. 

 

I only watched the first. This is the type of comedy that makes other races laugh. They are very comfortable with this image of how black people talk. That's why videos like this can and will always have hundreds of thousands or millions of views. If you ever want any viral fame or be popularity, just act out a black stereotype that makes people comfortable.

 

Maybe I'm getting old, but I didn't find it funny at all. We don't even talk like that among each other.

 

There's a youtube channel (I won't name it so I won't promote it) that basically reviews books but the guy does it in a "thug" style. Durag, gold chain, bucking his eyes, screaming. It is a very popular channel and goes off the same premise. People watch to see the buffoonery. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Walkman93 said:

Maybe I'm getting old, but I didn't find it funny at all.

 

That is what I think about myself.  A friend once told me that I need to turn my brain off, relax and just enjoy the nonsense.  I'm just not built that way fortunately there is a pretty of stuff that I do find funny.

 

It is not that stereotypes are not funny, it is just the gratuitous use of them is not funny to me.  I thought for example that The Boondocks satire was funny and at times brilliant -- which is particularly remarkable coming from the brain of such a young man (at the time).

 

@Walkman93 please email or message me the name of the the channel I'd like to check out one of the book reviews. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/1/2020 at 11:36 AM, Pioneer1 said:

t reminds me of the Eddie Murphy Saturday Night Live skits where he uses his funny as hell talent to further re-enforce negative stereotypes of Black men but not the positive ones.

 

True. I never watched much of Eddie Murphy but yes, these skits reminds me of him. I do remember he did something like this Mr. Rogers skit.

 

On 4/1/2020 at 8:48 PM, Troy said:

It is why i don't find Madea film very funny. If you've seen on you've seen them all.

 

My reaction to these vides was, like Madea. For me, it was kind of like 'a knee jerk reaction'. I thought 

the few Madea films I watch were funny, but after watching the first few, I stopped altogether.

On 4/1/2020 at 11:36 AM, Pioneer1 said:

Lol, this will probably be a Buzz Kill but........

 

Again, @Pioneer1 For me, this was a knew jerk reaction. As I was watching, I thought it was funny but, yes, all

the while, I thought, in the back of my mind, this is like 'a black face' or a minstel show. 

 

I remember years ago, I watch Martin Lawrence and Eddie Murphy doing their Drag Queen and I thought it was funny,

but I was abruptly 'corrected' by some Black men! They responded that it was offensive to see Black men mock

Black women, and it was SOOooo awakening for me.

 

So therefore, I won't post anything like this anymore.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Troy

It is why i don't find Madea film very funny. If you've seen on you've seen them all. But i get why owople find this stuff funny, so I dont try to kill anyone's "buzz."


Not only don't I find the Madea character funny, I find it down right offensive.
Just another attempt to "masculinize" the image of AfroAmerican women and make them look less lady-like.  
This masculinization of AfroAmerican women ain't new.  I believe  Sojourner Truth  during a speech showed the audience her titties and said, "Ain't I a woman too?" in response to the way so many sisters were mistreated in those days.

People wonder why a Caucasian police officer pulls over a Black woman and beats her or kills her but perhaps he had the character of a loud, angry, masculine brutish Black woman in his head from those Madea flicks and others like them.

It used to be an insult among children to say "your mother wears combat boots" because of what it implied. When it became acceptable and even desirable for so many older Black women to be portrayed as "stong" and "mannish" I'm not sure.

On a lighter note, I actually DO have a level of respect for our brother Tyler Perry for his business skills and charitable work.  So I give credit to where credit is due.


 

 


Chev

 

So therefore, I won't post anything like this anymore.


Lol.......
My comments weren't meant to be a reprimand, they were just my opinions.

I'm actually GLAD you started this thread and posted those videos because it opened up a conversation about things I wanted to express!

As far as Eddie Murphy and Martin.......
It's one thing to put on a dress and act like a woman (FOR ACTING ONLY) once or twice in one's career, but it's an entirely different thing to make a CULTURE out of it like Tyler Perry did.

When you know Hollywood has a history of attempting to demasculinize and even dehumanize you, how much money could they pay you to sell your soul like that?

 

 

 


Walkman

Your dislike of Black buffoonery and coonery has less to do with age and more to do with common sense and a sense of self respect that a person SHOULD have at any age.
I found shit like that offensive even in my 20s.

I remember going into barbershops and laundry mats where Jenny Jones and Jerry Springer were on television and I'd request them to turn the channel to more respectable programming.

Most people with basic common sense would find attempts to criminalize and dehumanize them offensive but then again, many of our people don't have a lot of sense so perhaps they don't know when they're being insulted.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Pioneer1 said:

So therefore, I won't post anything like this anymore.


Lol.......
My comments weren't meant to be a reprimand...

 

@Chevdove I ditto that. Please don't edit youself cause two old fuddie duddies don't share your sense of humor.

 

@Pioneer1 i always said the culture wants to feminize men. The more you can get men in the salons buying products and the stores buying trendy fashions, getting piercings and fancy hairstyles and their tie nails painted the more money you can make of them.

 

4 hours ago, Pioneer1 said:

When it became acceptable and even desirable for so many older Black women to be portrayed as "stong" and "mannish" I'm not sure.

 

The ideal of what is feminine is a white man's construct.  This ideal is the one that you embrace @Pioneer1. Things changed substantially for white women as they gained more rights.

 

Black wpmen benfited too but were never really considered the feminine idea... by the larger society.... but that what Black men are here for 😉

 

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/4/2020 at 4:26 PM, Pioneer1 said:

Lol.......
My comments weren't meant to be a reprimand, they were just my opinions.

 

That's okay Brother! LOL. @Pioneer1Sometimes it's good to have this kind of checks and balances!

 

 

On 4/4/2020 at 4:26 PM, Pioneer1 said:

As far as Eddie Murphy and Martin.......
It's one thing to put on a dress and act like a woman (FOR ACTING ONLY) once or twice in one's career, but it's an entirely different thing to make a CULTURE out of it like Tyler Perry did.

 

You are not lying! Tyler Perry keeps on going and going with this. 

I heard he is not mad at Spike Lee though, and he dedicated a stage to him in Atlanta or something like this.

I wonder how Spike Lee has responded?

 

On 4/4/2020 at 4:26 PM, Pioneer1 said:

perhaps they don't know when they're being insulted.

 

Lol. Maybe.

 

On 4/4/2020 at 9:17 PM, Troy said:

I ditto that. Please don't edit youself cause two old fuddie duddies don't share your sense of humor.

 

Okay. Thanks @Troy! But again, I don't mind taking a little heat from the brothers. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Troy

Like you said, what is considered "feminine" is a white man's construct because we've always had different standards in our community about what makes a good/cool/real man.

Do you remember back BEFORE the 80s when AfroAmerican men used to get their "nails done"?  
I do.
I remember when Black men used to get their nails manicured and coated with clear nail polish up in the barbershops!

I remember Black men have always been good cooks in the home even at a time where in larger American society cooking was considered a woman's responsibility.




but that what Black men are here for


Powerful!
One of the most on-point things I've heard in a while because it "orientates" you to what your responsibility is.

 

 

 



Chev

 

 

Sometimes it's good to have this kind of checks and balances!


Shhh.....don't say "check"!
....it'll just remind me of those stimulus checks I'm waiting on, lol.

You KNOW the world is coming to an end when Republican conservatives start giving a way money, lol.
Anyway.....

I didn't know there was a rift between Tyler Perry and Spike Lee.
I'm going to pretend like I can't google it and ask you WHAT HAPPENED?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/7/2020 at 10:20 AM, Pioneer1 said:

don't say "check"!
....it'll just remind me of those stimulus checks I'm waiting on, lol.

 

lol!

 

On 4/7/2020 at 10:20 AM, Pioneer1 said:

I didn't know there was a rift between Tyler Perry and Spike Lee.
I'm going to pretend like I can't google it and ask you WHAT HAPPENED?

 

You know @Pioneer1 I didn't follow the story very well, but I am sure there is/was a rift.

I think years back it stemmed from Spike Lee in that he did not like Tyler Perry's style of presenting

Black people. I think he referred to it as bringing back the days of Amos and Andy. Now, I didn't 

have any idea what even that meant myself--Amos and Andy. But I googled years ago and

found out that Amos and Andy was before my time, but it was about two black men

who portrayed black people in the same way that Tyler Perry does. 

I would have to google myself to find out more about the rift between Tyler Perry and Spike Lee.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is no beef between Spike and Tyler. This is white provocateurs (and their Black social media stooges).

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chev

Did you know the original Amos and Andy weren't even AfroAmerican but actually Caucasian performers who learned to mimic the voices and behaviors of AfroAmericans at that time?



Troy

When I watch that video clip.......
I can't help but to notice that although the show has a "Black vibe" to it, Spike Lee looks to be the ONLY authentic Black man on the set!

Everyone else has that Puerto Rican/mixed look.

Say what you will about the quality of them, but atleast back in the 70s when you had those stereotypical "What's Going Down" and "Jive Sucka" shows on television and radio that catered to the AfroAmerican audience.....the hosts were CLEARLY AfroAmerican.
There was no head scratching and trying to guess their background.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Pioneer1 said:

Everyone else has that Puerto Rican/mixed look.

 

Pioneer there are blond haired blue eyed Puerto Ricans, Puerto Ricans much darker than spike, and everything in between.

 

Puerto Rico is a nationality, you can't assume someone is from PR based upon the color of their skin any more than you can do that for an American.

 

To your point, sure Spike is the darkest dude on the set but the station is not designed to appeal only to Black people any more than rap music is.

 

 I'm sure that is why many of the Power, KISS, Hot f.m. radio stations use people like that Black sounding white people and lighted "skinned" Black people. Welcome to America.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/9/2020 at 6:14 PM, Troy said:

There is no beef between Spike and Tyler. This is white provocateurs (and their Black social media stooges).

 

@Troy It's good to hear Spike speak on this! But nevertheless, the man that interviewed him used the term 'Bufoonery' and 'Coonery', LOL, so at least I know that I heard the same misinformation that he did and that was going around. I am glad that Spike and Tyler are friend, but then the explanation that Spike gave was definitely vague as he used the terms 'my opinion' and tried to separate 'his opinions' from what Tyler Perry does produce. It does sound like a lot of 'straddling the fence' rhetoric. Tyler Perry does do a lot of that kind of coonery and this cannot be denied. Yes, it pays a lot of money but, even if Spike pulls back and chooses not to give 'others' the benefit of 'dividing to conquer', imo, this kind of issue can do that all by itself. As a Black person, I think we should at some point address this kind of money-making issue, and yes, this thread that I started, does address this 'knee jerk' kind of comedy. 

 

15 hours ago, Pioneer1 said:

Did you know the original Amos and Andy weren't even AfroAmerican but actually Caucasian performers who learned to mimic the voices and behaviors of AfroAmericans at that time?

 

@Pioneer1 Oh Gosh! LOL. I realized this after I logged off days ago because I did a quick google. I couldn't believe it!

It's just like this thread! LOL. Two White men micmicing Black males -- Man! 

Then there was a spin off of Black men using the same name 'Amos and Andy' and continuing on for years!

Kind of like a spin off of TYRONE and JABARI....

So, this has been going on for so long!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Pioneer1 said:

can't help but to notice that although the show has a "Black vibe" to it, Spike Lee looks to be the ONLY authentic Black man on the set!

 

Get out!!! This is exactly what I described in the other recent thread about the term SLAV!!!

 

12 hours ago, Troy said:

Puerto Rico is a nationality, you can't assume someone is from PR based upon the color of their skin any more than you can do that for an American.

 

Ah! But Troy, they still do have an ORIGIN! And to equate that with the term 'AMERICAN'!? Isn't that a little to broad?

American people have a history too.

 

12 hours ago, Troy said:

the station is not designed to appeal only to Black people any more than rap music is.

 

Yes, but this particular topic addressed to Spike Lee about 'COONERY' and 'BUFOONERY' does address a specific culture and so, 

in this regard, it does make sense to me what Pioneer is saying. I gather though, that the men interviewing Spike may be, at least, Part-African AMerican?

I'm not sure though.

 

12 hours ago, Troy said:

Welcome to America.

 

 Uhm. I don't know about this take though. So White Americans are allowed to define other cultures, and joke about others, but we cannot make specific acknowledgements or comments about who is doing this? We can't question or take offense about people 'making fun of our cultural antics' because we are all in a melting pot? Is it a melting pot, really?

 

But yeah, I guess that's America.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

America is far from a melting pot as current hyper partisan politics illustrate.

 

2 hours ago, Chevdove said:

Ah! But Troy, they still do have an ORIGIN! And to equate that with the term 'AMERICAN'!? Isn't that a little to broad?

American people have a history too.

 

@Chevdove my point to Pioneer was simply that any "look" he attributed to a Puerto Rican is based upon a prejudice caused by American indoctrination.  @Pioneer1 have you visited PR and ventured beyond the hotel swimming pool? In terms of what you call racial diversity PR is pretty diverse.

,

2 hours ago, Chevdove said:

Yes, but this particular topic addressed to Spike Lee about 'COONERY' and 'BUFOONERY' does address a specific culture and so, 

in this regard, it does make sense to me what Pioneer is saying. I gather though, that the men interviewing Spike may be, at least, Part-African AMerican?

I'm not sure though.

 

Again the issue of trying to determine if the speaker is part "African-American," is of little consequence.  By your definition I'm "part African -American." From my perspective it is not based upon your skin color it is a function of the culture you identify with.  Again you can't determine this by someone's nationality ot skin color.  You have to get to know them.

 

I know our country people prefer simplicity, there is no room for gray areas, subtlety, or even a little uncertainty. 

 

BTW, I'm sure Spike think Perry films are "Coonery," and probably laments the fact that he has been able to enrich himself to a greater level than he has. Spike is not dumb enough to continue publicly degrading another filmmaker for the amusement of Hot 97 listeners.  Even the title of the Hot 97 Video uses the word "beef," when there is no beef.  A Tyler-Spike beef is something that Hot 97 is promoting for ratings.  

 

2 hours ago, Chevdove said:

I don't know about this take though.

 

I use the "Welcome to America" phrase as a sarcastic response acknowledge America's ills.  Someone expresses surprise that America incarcerates more people than any other first world nation, I say "welcome to America." Shocked we elected a dim-witted, con artist as president; I say, "Welcome to America." 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Troy

Ofcourse Puerto Rican is a nationality and not a race, if you remember I'm the one who usually educated OTHERS on this very matter....lol.
But it's also an ETHNIC GROUP (within an ethnic group) in America now and although their phenotypes run the gamut...the vast majority of Puerto Ricans are mixed race and look like the mixed AfroAmericans of the United States.

Italian is a nationality without a set "look" also, but if you went to Little Italy but come across a group of men all with yellow skin, bone-straight black hair, and slanted eyes and ask them are they Italian....they'll look at you like you're half crazy figuring you should know better.

The fact is, certain "looks" are dominant among certain ethnic groups.
So in THIS CONTEXT, it's safe to say that for this discussion there indeed is a "Puerto Rican look".

 

 

 

have you visited PR and ventured beyond the hotel swimming pool? In terms of what you call racial diversity PR is pretty diverse.


Perhaps, or.....
IF YOU visited Puerto Rico, went beyond the tourist areas, and saw a racial diversity of people perhaps THEY TOO like you were from other parts of the world and weren't indeed Puerto Ricans either!

If this were the case, then you may have been assuming Puerto Rico was more racially diverse than it actually was....lol.


 

 

 



Chev

Caucasians have always had a "secret love affair" with Black people and our style of behavior, talk, and dress. They love the creativity of Black people (music, art, dance, dress, ect...) but don't like Black people....so they go out of their way to find Caucasians who can imitate our style the best. They know our styles are superior.

This is where your Bee Gees, Marky Mark and the Funky Bunch, Michael McDonalds, and Eminems are so popular.

Infact, the entire Pop music genre was built upon Caucasian musicians trying to mimic and style AfroAmerican music.
Pop music is nothing but watered down R&B like "southern food" is watered down Soul Food, lol.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I dunno @Pioneer1 I just think when you throw out comments like Spike being the "only authentic Black man" and the others being "Puerto Rican/mixed," it just become a sloppy conversation, because those terms only have meaning to you and oeople who think like you.

 

For example the one doing most of the talking (far right) just looked like a straight up white boy. The one to the left of spike could be Black, though not "authenticity" Black as you'd describe it. I wouldn't put a qualifier on someone's Blackness. That is like saying Cynique is not authetically Black, and that Del is more authentically Bkack than me...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Troy

Lol, if you don't like the term "authentic Black man" how about ADOS?

American Descendant Of Slavery

Spike looks like the only ADOS on the set.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/11/2020 at 11:52 AM, Troy said:

my point to Pioneer was simply that any "look" he attributed to a Puerto Rican is based upon a prejudice caused by American indoctrination

 

@Troy So true!

 

On 4/11/2020 at 11:52 AM, Troy said:

Again you can't determine this by someone's nationality ot skin color.  You have to get to know them.

 

Again, so true.

On 4/11/2020 at 11:52 AM, Troy said:

Someone expresses surprise that America incarcerates more people than any other first world nation, I say "welcome to America." Shocked we elected a dim-witted, con artist as president; I say, "Welcome to America." 

 

Yes. okay. LOL.

 

On 4/11/2020 at 1:24 PM, Pioneer1 said:

...so they go out of their way to find Caucasians who can imitate our style the best. They know our styles are superior.

 

Yites!!! @Pioneer1 This is true! I believe you. And again, think about this though, many of 'us' do the same thing in return. Many Black folk are completely obsessed about White people and White cultures and go 'all out' to micmic them to the point that some even go much farther than that and try to chemically change their phenotype permanently. 

 

You know, I think, even regarding this thread, some of what you say about White people micmicing us would not be bad if they don't harbor the hate.

Actually, immulating a good quality of someone else can be seen as positive, but the hate that some people have always creeps into the mix.

On the other hand, if Black people that wear blonde hair want to do it to look good and see this as a positive aspect of many White people, then that shouldn't be looked at as if it is a bad thing, but when it is done due to Black-Self-Hatred, then that is the problem.

 

But you mention Michael McDonald; I don't see him as emulating Black people though, he has a very 'heavy voice' and it compliments

our kind of music, imo. 

 

 

On 4/11/2020 at 1:24 PM, Pioneer1 said:

This is where your Bee Gees, Marky Mark and the Funky Bunch, Michael McDonalds, and Eminems are so popular.

Infact, the entire Pop music genre was built upon Caucasian musicians trying to mimic and style AfroAmerican music.
Pop music is nothing but watered down R&B like "southern food" is watered down Soul Food, lol.

 

Yes, this is interesting point you make.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chev

You're right, the mimicking goes both ways.
I also like listening to Michael McDonald and the Doobie Brothers myself.
However I do recognize that much of their fame comes from their ability to imitate "Black" music.

 



On the other hand, if Black people that wear blonde hair want to do it to look good and see this as a positive aspect of many White people, then that shouldn't be looked at as if it is a bad thing, but when it is done due to Black-Self-Hatred, then that is the problem.


And that IS the problem, it's done out of self-hatred.

When Caucasians imitate Black people it's done for strategic purposes. To "steal" the culture and claim it as their own. They aren't trying to BE Black....just confiscate the ideas.
But when most Black people try to imitate Caucasians it's in an effort to actually BECOME them.

Blonde hair is genetically recessive. The only reason most AfroAmericans desire to have it is NOT because it's stronger or naturally looks better than black hair, but because it's a predominately Caucasian trait and they feel it makes them look more Caucasian.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...