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Melanin Is Worth More Than Gold: Is This The Era Of The Blessed Generation?


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https://keyamsha.com/2020/06/05/miwmtg-pr/

Washington, D.C.— June 5, 2020Today, The Mhotep Corporation announced immediate availability of the new book “Melanin Is Worth More Than Gold: Is This The Era Of The Blessed Generation.”

“As the subtitle indicates, this is a new era. The era of the Blessed Generation,” said Nnamdi Azikiwe, the book’s author. “This is a new era because melanin is worth over $395 a gram more than gold. Not only that the Red, Black, and Green flag is approaching its 100th anniversary. Combined with the Afro, official currency of the United States of Africa being potentially worth over $2 the new era can’t be denied.”

Positive Customer Impact

Over 100,000 visitors to Keyamsha.com without benefit of media exposure attest to the attractive power of the chemical primarily responsible for the appearance of our hair, skin and eyes having a dollar value. Mr. Azikiwe learned melanin is worth more than gold while preparing for the March 2014 Sacred Libation Ceremony honoring African-American women lynched in America. The book enables us to activate the “audacious power” Dr. Adam Clayton Powell told us to seek. The new grammar of people educated regarding melanin produces a new rhetoric. The rhetoric invokes power Dr. Huey P. Newton still tells us comes with the ability to define phenomena.

 

Our Blood, Our Melanin and Africa Unites Us

Melanin myths, Urban legends, and hoaxes perpetrated by social media miscreants dubbed the “Melanin Deniers” prompted the publication of “Melanin Is Worth More Than Gold.” They did that by launching a Melanin Twitter Bomb aimed at African American women and people of African ancestry in general on March 24, 2017.

our-blood-our-melanin-and-africa-unites-

The culturally coded symbolism embedded in the Red, Black and Green tells those who are willing to know the truth: Our Blood Our Melanin and Africa UNITES US!!!

The book is available for immediate download as an eBook on Smashwords, Barnes and Noble, Kobo and other retailers.

 

Founded in 2003, The Mhotep Corporation has a wide range of products designed to fulfill its mission to “engage, entertain and educate” audiences.

###

The Mhotep Corporation and its products are either registered trademarks or trademarks of The Mhotep Corporation in the United States and/or other countries.

The names of actual companies and products mentioned herein may be the trademarks of their respective owners.

For more information, press only:

PR Contact Name Nnamdi Azikiwe

Phone number: 202-294-0018

Email: nnamdi.azikiwe@gmail.com

For more information on Product:

Website: http://www.keyamsha.com

Online version of this post: https://keyamsha.com/2020/06/05/miwmtg-pr/

Smashwords: https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/1015855

Edited by Nnamdi Azikiwe
Remove direct link to Ama*on and make Troy happy.
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17 hours ago, Troy said:

Aren't there any Black-owned bookstores you can send readers to

You changed my whole approach to selling books. Thank you Troy. I mean that in all possible ways. I am truly grateful. What I really need is a system to make that happen. How to get all the Black book stores to carry my book? That is the question I am working on right now.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Nnamdi Azikiwe said:

How to get all the Black book stores to carry my book?

 

That is probably not possible Nnamdi. You want your book in every store where it is likely to sold to readers who will buy it. Every bookseller and store has their own tastes and focus. Indentify the stores where your book will most likely resonate and work with them.

 

I'm in the process of trying to figure out how Black dustributors and booksellers can work together reclaim revenue going to Amazon and bookshop.org and to drive demand for important books. We are FAR to dependent upon the majority culture when it comes deciding which authors have a voice.

 

This is a hard problem to solve but it is not intractable.

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1 hour ago, Troy said:

This is a hard problem to solve but it is not intractable.

I have three primary skills: attention to detail, critical thinking and problem solving. In fact here's how it works: find a model that does "most" of what you want and then figure out what it is missing. For instance you just described "work together to reclaim revenue." Put a dollar figure on that revenue. Show how it benefits those distributors and booksellers. The rest will take care of itself.

 

Affiliate marketing will have to be part of the picture too. Do people who shop with AALBC have a way to earn income from directing their friends to shop here like people do on A2Z?

 

Yesterday I had an idea for "Black bookstore day." When was the first Black bookstore opened? What is the history of Black Bookstores? Why are Black Bookstores important. Believe it or not I met a young woman this summer who is an African-American college graduate who had no idea there were Black bookstores until she met me. That's a problem too. People can't shop with us if they do not know we are open for business.

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9 hours ago, Nnamdi Azikiwe said:

Do people who shop with AALBC have a way to earn income from directing their friends to shop here like people do on A2Z?

 

I'm actually working on that as we speak. My test case will be this book. https://aalbc.com/books/bookinfo.php?isbn13=9781568528403 

 

I'm work on securing all the available copies. Amazon will only be able to sell used copies. Looking at giving affiliates 25% of sale price.

 

9 hours ago, Nnamdi Azikiwe said:

People can't shop with us if they do not know we are open for business.

 

When white folks wanted to support Black bookstores this summer they made it happen. I can give you numerouse examples of what they did.

 

I can also give you examples of where we failed to step up.

 

I've shared examples of both on these forums

 

Some responsibility is on the reader too. If that Black college graduate was not aware there were Black owned books stores, that means she never bothered to look.

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10 hours ago, Troy said:

that means she never bothered to look.

True. Thing is she never even knew Black bookstores existed. At one time, I was the same way.

 

Strange as it may seem, I grew up about three blocks from Pyramid books in DC on Georgia Avenue. Went past there everyday on my way to high school. A friend's cousin was friends with a competitor of Pyramid, Jewels of Aton. I was a grown man before I knew either one of them existed. AND i LOVE READING!!! The distance I traveled to find comic books compared to how close those two stores were even now amazes me.

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