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Will the "end of affirmative action in college admissions" soon become a reality? Maybe it's time to bone up on those books, folks.


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@nelsmaybe, I don't think affirmative action's role in black enrollment in colleges is as grand as some think. I know most black people in nyc, and I think most black people,male/female/DOSer/immgrant/teenage/20s/30s/40s/50s, outside NYC go to college absent affirmative action having an influence, and they matriculate and leave and live . For some institutions, especially the ivy leagues it may shift black enrollment, but so what, the usa is full of colleges. If learning is what you want to do , you don't need an ivy league school. Ray BRadbury is a white man, he couldn't afford to go to school, many people today still can't afford it, he went to the library. You know some of his work. LAngston hughes was a college graduate when bradbury was a baby. So... I don't know what more to say. Black kids like all children study. Some have great grades, some don't. this is all children. I don't know what your point about study quality is. I know children in NYC who are white asian or white european  or white latino and are terrible students. Some didn't go to college. Some did. 

 

@ProfD  great comment, I reply to you at the following url

https://aalbc.com/tc/profile/6477-richardmurray/?status=1793&type=status

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On 1/25/2022 at 2:58 PM, richardmurray said:

I don't think affirmative action's role in black enrollment in colleges is as grand as some think.

 

This topic never really interested me until I read a post in this community last year that revolved around the late Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. 

I saw a video whereby Dr. King spoke about how European Americans were given 'welfare checks' and etc. after hearing his views, I apply it to this issue about Affirmative action. If other people, even immigrants are given aid to be able to be educated here in America, then certainly I think African Americans should be considered for some type of aid. However, I also think about the type of education as well that has been offered. I think, in the past, we have been given faulty education and exploited to serve the goals of this system...

 

I graduated from an HBCU and believe too that America's curriculum needs an overhaul in these institutions as well, otherwise the purpose of Affirmative action is not well served. 

 

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The basic purpose of education is literacy in providing folks with the requisite skills to function in a *civilized* society.

 

Institutions of higher learning are supposed to provide specialized training in various fields of study. 

 

Ivy league institutions are exclusive country clubs, er, educational facilities that allow privileged folks to network among themselves.

 

The main purpose of all institutions of higher learning is handing out lottery tickets into the world of employment. There's a huge labor force and a finite number of jobs. 

 

The goal of affirmative action was to level the playing field in providing minorities with an opportunity to access the same education and job opportunities as white folks.

 

My feeling has always been that black folks should be using every opportunity towards their own wealth building infrastructure on all fronts. Not merely to get a *good* job and paychecks.

 

Having a solid infrastructure in place, black folks would not have to depend on affirmative action. Our institutions and job markets would be robust enough for black folks to thrive and survive independently. 😎

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All Affirmative Action did was open up professions in industries to Black men and women who for decades had been shut out of these jobs and industries simply because of the color of their skin.

For further reading on this issue, rather than relying on people who rarely do any research, here ya go:

https://www.justgreatlawyers.com/legal-guides/affirmative-action-statistics-facts

But when it was all said and done, the primary beneficiaries of Affirmative Action turned out to NOT to be Black men and women, but White women. At least this was the case in the mid-1990's.

How many of you actually knew this? 

And why Affirmative Action was needed and is probably STILL needed is because of this type of racist garbage:

https://www.clickondetroit.com/news/local/2022/05/19/roeper-school-teacher-on-leave-after-assignment-depicts-barack-obama-alongside-primates/

Nels, who seems to have it in for former President Barack Obama, would likely be okay with this. I'm not. 

Black people are NOT apes or monkeys.

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7 hours ago, Stefan said:

But when it was all said and done, the primary beneficiaries of Affirmative Action turned out to NOT to be Black men and women, but White women. At least this was the case in the mid-1990's.

How many of you actually knew this? 

I knew it. Chose not to make my diatribe longer by including that fact. Thanks for addressing it. 😎

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@Chevdove

of course black folk warrant more opportunity in the usa, considering we were not only enslaved, but that our leaders successfully guided us to be a people who in majority have bought into the myth of araciality in the usa. I don't mean that black people don't know they are black. but, most black people in the usa, based on their actions, accept the idea of a country where the individual is the standard. The black person alone in a white community for example. Most black people, by their actions, deem that the point of the usa. You don't need your community to defend you. do I concur to that mentality? no. but I comprehend it, and it is part of the reason so many black people push equality cause, as al sharpton said, the nonviolent movement isn't merely about those abusing you to stop but for you to not abuse others. Unfortunately, while most black people have accepted a peaceful agenda in the multiracial collective that is the usa, most nonblacks, have not. 

Yeah, education does need to improve. But part of the problem is , education in a school can't undo culture or heritage learned from the home, part of the home educations. And, the usa has many angry communities where the home isn't happy. the native american home on the reservation isn't dancing , having a great time. The black home in black towns in the south isn't having a party. the white home in white towns across the usa aren't dancing for joy. And as the populations of white asians or black asians, white latinos or black latinos grow, even absent their anglo or african or european cousins, they are dispirited. So a lot of people are unhappy in the usa, always have been. And the narratives about bootstraps and laziness and similar, don't hold water, are lies, but have created resentments over the centuries that a text book or teacher in a class can't switch into determinations. 

Congrats to going to a HBCU. I congratulate you not for the education there, cause education isn't about the school you go to. But I congratulate you for giving your money and rearing time to an institution of learning that hires black:) 

MLK jr said something like this right?

https://aalbc.com/tc/profile/6477-richardmurray/?status=1924&type=status

 

@Stefan I know, but to be blunt, it isn't like the Black village in the usa is capable of demanding anything. From black people in leadership positions to black people on the street, we tend to talk of the law or absence of the law, not power. so, the pathway of affirmative action was not in a black communal control. 

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On 5/21/2022 at 4:53 PM, Stefan said:

But when it was all said and done, the primary beneficiaries of Affirmative Action turned out to NOT to be Black men and women, but White women. At least this was the case in the mid-1990's.

How many of you actually knew this? 

 

I knew this. And it is so frustrating when I hear it because so many times Black people have been sidelined by other cultures who came to America for 'a piece of the pie'. But I also think that it would be so unfair to direct anger towards White women who have benefitted due to Affirmative Action. How many White women have helped me in 'the Black plight'? Many. I have so much admiration for some of the polished, professional, and compassionate White women who have sacrificed to help me. I think while we should definitely be bold in dealing with White evils that occur in America, however, we should not ignore positive humanity that comes from many walks of life. 

 

 

On 5/22/2022 at 2:46 AM, richardmurray said:

Congrats to going to a HBCU.

 

thank you @richardmurray. It was one of the most amazing experiences of my life. 

 

On 5/22/2022 at 2:46 AM, richardmurray said:

of course black folk warrant more opportunity in the usa, considering we were not only enslaved, but that our leaders successfully guided us to be a people who in majority have bought into the myth of araciality in the usa. I don't mean that black people don't know they are black. but, most black people in the usa, based on their actions, accept the idea of a country where the individual is the standard. ... Unfortunately, while most black people have accepted a peaceful agenda in the multiracial collective that is the usa, most nonblacks, have not.  ... education in a school can't undo culture or heritage learned from the home, part of the home educations.  

 

This entire post is one of the most enriching textual comments I have ever read in a long time! 

Yes, the clip of the late Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., addressing the 'Bootstrap insult to us', Ah! ... when I hear him speak, I am deeply relieved.   

Edited by Chevdove
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16 minutes ago, Chevdove said:

But I also think that it would be so unfair to direct anger towards White women who have benefitted due to Affirmative Action. How many White women have helped me in 'the Black plight'? Many. I have so much admiration for some of the polished, professional, and compassionate White women who have sacrificed to help me. I think while we should definitely be bold in dealing with White evils that occur in America, however, we should not ignore positive humanity that comes from many walks of life. 

There is no need for anger towards benevolent white folks.  Just don't fall asleep when it comes to the role they play in the maintenance of white supremacy. 

 

Helping black folks makes white folks feel better about themselves considering the legacy of America. 😎

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@Chevdove do you know of a book of graduates from hbcu's speaking on their experiences? I don't know of a book like that. I imagine it exists. I know of many individuals who have stated their time at one. but, a collection, i can not recall. 

 

Thanks, What I love about that clip is it proved what I have always said, which some people, even black people, need reminding. MLK jr wasn't a fool. Yes, I oppose the strategy of MLK jr, but I never felt or thought he was a fool. He didn't miscomprehend disadvantage. He did not  feel that black people need to unfairly struggle. He did not feel that black people should not have advantage. MLK jr, advocated non violence in the usa because when one black person is alone and don't have any other black support, all they can do usually, is fight through the system nonwhite's have constructed. A system that only provides to the individual the rule of law. But MLK jr. never thought black people in the usa didn't warrant advantage, or didn't deserve opportunity , even if unmerited. He figured  that the best way for peace in the most heavily multiracial country that only keeps accepting more new races every day is for all to have advantage , for all to have opportunity.  

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37 minutes ago, richardmurray said:

 do you know of a book of graduates from hbcu's speaking on their experiences? I don't know of a book like that. I imagine it exists. I know of many individuals who have stated their time at one. but, a collection, i can not recall. 

 

@richardmurray No I don not know of any. I wish I had the confidence to write a book about my experiences. I can't find the words in completion right now to express the deep feelings I have about it. It was as close to nirvana as I could have gotten so far, on this earth. Yes, it had some pitfalls and a significant amount of negativity but prior to going there, I thought it was going to be awful being around all of those black people. Now, afterwards, I just can't believe that I was fooled to think like that--Me!--a Black person myself. 

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30 minutes ago, richardmurray said:

MLK jr wasn't a fool. Yes, I oppose the strategy of MLK jr, but I never felt or thought he was a fool. He didn't miscomprehend disadvantage. MLK jr, advocated non violence in the usa because when one black person is alone and don't have any other black support, all they can do usually, is fight through the system nonwhite's have constructed. But MLK jr. never thought black people in the usa didn't warrant advantage, or didn't deserve opportunity , even if unmerited. He figured  that the best way for peace in the most heavily multiracial country that only keeps accepting more new races every day is for all to have advantage , for all to have opportunity.  

Dr. MLK Jr. definitely understood the struggles of black folks in America during his time and into the future especially considering the system constructed by white folks. 

 

Also, as a man of faith and knowing black folks were out-gunned and also that white folks enjoy killing, I'd imagine Dr. MLK Jr. felt that non-violence was a better approach than the wholesale slaughter of black folks in America. 

 

Dr. MLK Jr. saved AfroAmerican lives through non-violent protest and resistance. He wrote a book entitled "Why We Can't Wait".  Despite the marginal gains of black folks in America, I doubt that even Dr. MLK Jr. understood the global impact of the system of white supremacy and how long it stands to last. 😎

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5 hours ago, ProfD said:

Dr. MLK Jr. definitely understood the struggles of black folks in America during his time and into the future especially considering the system constructed by white folks. 

 

Also, as a man of faith and knowing black folks were out-gunned and also that white folks enjoy killing, I'd imagine Dr. MLK Jr. felt that non-violence was a better approach than the wholesale slaughter of black folks in America.


I hope everyone now understands WHY I question suggestions that Black people arm themselves.

If one is purchasing a legal firearm for home protection and obtains the necessary permits, I have no problem with this. I've been advocating this myself for more than two decades. But you'd better learn how to use the firearm or else you'll end up shooting someone you know.

But we all know that many Black people, no matter how old, have arrest records. That is a huge drawback, not so much for law enforcement, but for the news media. How many times have we read or heard a news report that intoned "he (or she) has a long record?" Do you how many people I've encountered who always thought dimly of our people's abilities and our accomplishments? How many have YOU heard say this?

Dr. King was well aware of this in his time on this planet. But he really did not know the extent of White hatred against Black people until he marched in northern cities. Here's the proof:

https://www.chicagotribune.com/opinion/commentary/ct-mlk-king-marquette-park-1966-flashback-perspec-0731-md-20160726-story.html

Now, for those who demand that Black people should arm themselves enmasse, that is completely foolish. For what end? To be arrested by the busload? Or to counterattack and exact revenge? We'd be slaughtered.

We would be giving White racists a chance to do what they've long dreamed of. To slaughter us.

 

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@Chevdove glad it was a great experience... I am saddened that you don't feel the confidence  to start such a literary venture, being part of this community. We are in AALBC and you don't feel you can do it. Well, I know you can. and I hope you decide to. 

 

@ProfD fair enough

 

@Stefan for me, the black village has many tribes and each tribe has their own size, some are small, some are large, and they each have their own goals, some are peaceful, some are violent, but for me, each can succeed. the question for each black person, is which tribe do you belong too. 

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3 hours ago, Stefan said:

I hope everyone now understands WHY I question suggestions that Black people arm themselves.

If one is purchasing a legal firearm for home protection and obtains the necessary permits, I have no problem with this. I've been advocating this myself for more than two decades. But you'd better learn how to use the firearm or else you'll end up shooting someone you know.

Now, for those who demand that Black people should arm themselves enmasse, that is completely foolish.


We would be giving White racists a chance to do what they've long dreamed of. To slaughter us.

I'm among the foolish who feels that black folks should arm themselves.

 

No, I don't think every black person walking the streets should be strapped. That would be reckless.

 

However, I'm in agreement that black folks who are qualified to legally possess and know how to use a firearm should have them.

 

Homeowners should definitely have some kind of home defense. Again, with the proper protocols in place to secure it. 

 

I'm not advocating that black folks should provoke white racists. I just believe we should be ready for war if they ever decide to wage it against us. I stay ready to protect mine. 😎

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On 5/23/2022 at 9:21 PM, richardmurray said:

glad it was a great experience... I am saddened that you don't feel the confidence  to start such a literary venture, being part of this community. We are in AALBC and you don't feel you can do it. Well, I know you can. and I hope you decide to. 

@richardmurray Thank you. I really, really appreciate this. I have so much doubt but I do hope that I can get the confidence up to write about my experiences. 

Part of my doubt is that I know that my views are extremely controversial and stem from my anguish about slavery in America. 

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@Chevdove my pleasure, I always support creativity among black people which is the heart of black nationalism. 

All I can add is, many artists have published work that was not received well when they were alive but had great reception afterwards. Controversial content is one of the most respectable things an artist can do because by default controversial content goes against fiscal profitability or mass appeal. So, I hope you create the book so that it exists in the ether of work that always gets its due .

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