3 Books Published by University of New Orleans Press on Our Site — Book Cover Mosaic

Click for more detail about New Orleans Griot: The Tom Dent Reader by Tom Dent and Edited by Kalamu ya Salaam New Orleans Griot: The Tom Dent Reader

by Tom Dent and Edited by Kalamu ya Salaam
University of New Orleans Press (Jan 22, 2018)
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A mid-twentieth century African American writer and cultural activist, Tom Dent worked tirelessly to help cultivate the Black Arts Movement, mentoring numerous other artists and writers. Taken from his papers held at the Amistad Research Center in New Orleans, this vital collection brings together Dent’s fiction, poetry, essays, interviews, and drama, including many previously unpublished works. With introductions by Kalamu ya Salaam, New Orleans Griot: A Tom Dent Reader showcases the remarkable life and writing of Tom Dent, from his early days in New York to working with the Free Southern Theatre in Mississippi to his astute observations of New Orleans and the black Mardi Gras Indians.


Click for more detail about Everybody Knows What Time It Is: But Nobody Can Stop the Clock by Reginald Martin Everybody Knows What Time It Is: But Nobody Can Stop the Clock

by Reginald Martin
University of New Orleans Press (Oct 16, 2010)
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The future South is not what it used to be. In the year 2020, when no one can see clearly, three of the South’s children find themselves embroiled a twisted tale of music, murder, sex . . . and history.


Click for more detail about The Katrina Papers: A Journal of Trauma and Recovery by Jerry W. Ward The Katrina Papers: A Journal of Trauma and Recovery

by Jerry W. Ward
University of New Orleans Press (May 16, 2009)
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The Katrina Papers is not your average memoir. It is a fusion of many kinds of writing, including intellectual autobiography, personal narrative, political/cultural analysis, spiritual journal, literary history, and poetry. Though it is the record of one man’s experience of Hurricane Katrina, it is a record that is fully a part of his life and work as a scholar, political activist, and professor. The Katrina Papers provides space not only for the traumatic events but also for ruminations on authors such as Richard Wright and theorists like Deleuze and Guattarri. The result is a complex though thoroughly accessible book. The struggle with form? the search for a medium proper to the complex social, personal, and political ramifications of an event unprecedented in this scholar’s life and in American social history? lies at the very heart of The Katrina Papers. The book depicts an enigmatic and multi-stranded world view which takes the local as its nexus for understanding the global. It resists the temptation to simplify or clarify when simplification and clarification are not possible. Ward’s narrative is, at times, very direct, but he always refuses to simplify the complex emotional and spiritual volatility of the process and the historical moment that he is witnessing. The end result is an honesty that is both pedagogical and inspiring. ?Hank Lazer