Book Review: Terminus: Tales of the Black Fantastic from the ATL

Click for a larger image of Terminus: Tales of the Black Fantastic from the ATL

by Milton J. Davis

    Publication Date:
    List Price: $17.95 (store prices may vary)
    Format: Paperback
    Classification: Fiction
    Page Count: 244
    ISBN13: 9780999278925
    Imprint: MVmedia, LLC
    Publisher: MVmedia, LLC
    Parent Company: MVmedia, LLC

    Read a Description of Terminus: Tales of the Black Fantastic from the ATL



    Book Reviewed by Amanda Robinson


    Atlanta is one of the most popular cities in this country. This metropolis is one of the few epicenters dripping Black pride. This city has produced some of the most iconic musicians, including Outkast, Gladys Knight, TLC, and Mary Lou Williams. Atlanta also bears a great history, having been used for military operations during the Civil War, and was home to Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. This great city even has a popular show named after it, created by its very own Donald Glover. But it doesn’t end there — Atlanta is home to the busiest airport in the entire world.

    Terminus is a compilation of mythical fantasies edited by Milton J. Davis, and authored by himself along with eight other writers whose, goal was to set their stories in the historic city of Atlanta. Each story is a dive into the deep end of make believe and unabridged imagination. Some of the stories are founded on the routine of everyday citizens, such as detectives, security guards and fire inspectors, who by chance encounter unordinary occurrences. On the other hand, several of the other anecdotes seem to be entirely concocted, and are in no way relatable. Terminus is, at times, gory in its fantastical depiction and is definitely not meant for the faint of heart. This book is surely for those who are captivated and enticed by mystery.

    I found myself confused during some parts of this compendium because it was at times very ambiguous. I have never been a huge fan of the mixture of fantasy with mystery, and that is exactly what this book is compiled of. Every once in a while, readers can expect to encounter a sprinkle of love and a dash of hope, but taking into consideration every anecdote, Terminus is overall a folklore of complexities in both the characters and the storylines as well.

    This book felt more like a marathon on the Sci-Fi channel than a representation of another dimension of Atlanta. I may have commenced reading this book with the preconceived notion that I would feel more like I was actually in the city, but instead it felt like Atlanta was some far off backdrop. Terminus was not my favorite cup of tea, but I definitely recommend it to anyone who appreciates monsters and the supernatural.

    Read MVmedia, LLC’s description of Terminus: Tales of the Black Fantastic from the ATL.