5 Books Published by Abingdon Press on AALBC — Book Cover Collage

Click for more detail about How Sweet the Sound by Vanessa Miller How Sweet the Sound

by Vanessa Miller
Abingdon Press (Mar 04, 2014)
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Shar Gracey wants nothing more than to sing the Lord’s praises, so she jumps at the chance to join a traveling choir led by the father of black gospel music, Thomas A. Dorsey. Better yet, the opportunity will give her money to pay for her ailing mother’s medical care. While on tour she falls under the tutelage of gospel great Mahalia Jackson—and falls for the handsome but not-so-great Nicoli James, whose desires for Shar are fueled by his own greed. Shar would do anything for Nicoli—and he knows it—so when his life is threatened after a night of gambling, Shar agrees to help pay Nicoli’s debt, only to have her faith and dreams shattered. Reeling from the betrayal, Shar loses her voice and she believes that she will never sing again. She has no place to run except back home to her seriously ill mother—and the man she left behind, who would move heaven and earth to make Shar’s pain go away. Even if it means he has to let her go … again.


Click for more detail about Wake Up: Hip-Hop, Christianity, and the Black Church by Cheryl A. Kirk-Duggan and Marlon F. Hall Wake Up: Hip-Hop, Christianity, and the Black Church

by Cheryl A. Kirk-Duggan and Marlon F. Hall
Abingdon Press (Jun 01, 2011)
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First an expression of black urban youth, Hip Hop music continues to expand as a cultural expression of youth and, now, young adults more generally. As a cultural phenomenon, it has even become integral to the worship experience of a growing number of churches who are reaching out to these groups. This includes not just African American churches but churches of all ethnic groups. Once seen as advocating violence, Hip Hop can be the Church’s agent of salvation and praise to transform society and reach youth and young adults in greater numbers.

After looking at Hip Hop’s socio-historical context including its African roots, Wake Up shows how Hip Hop has come to embody the worldview of growing numbers of youth and young adults in today’s church. The authors make the case that Hip Hop represents the angst and hope of many youth and young adults and that by examining the inherent religious themes embedded in the music, the church can help shape the culture of hip-hop by changing its own forms of preaching and worship so that it can more effectively offer a message of repentance and liberation.


Click for more detail about Long Time Coming by Vanessa Miller Long Time Coming

by Vanessa Miller
Abingdon Press (Nov 01, 2010)
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Deidre Clark-Morris is a faithful Christian who has everything she could dream of, except the children her heart longs for. Kenisha Smalls has lived in poverty all her life. She has three children by three different men and has just been diagnosed with inoperable cancer. While the meeting between these two women appears accidental, it becomes their catalyst of hope. Neither woman expects the blessing that God has in store for her. While Deidre guides Kenisha on the path to eternal life with Jesus Christ, Kenisha teaches Deidre how to stand strong against the storms of life.


Click for more detail about Keep It Real: Working with Today’s Black Youth by Anne E. Streaty Wimberly Keep It Real: Working with Today’s Black Youth

by Anne E. Streaty Wimberly
Abingdon Press (Oct 01, 2005)
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The first edition of Working with Black Youth, edited by Charles R. Foster and Grant S. Shockley, was published in 1989. Since that time the challenges for black youth have only intensified and grown in complexity. A burning question of Black churches continues to be: How can we effectively ministry with our youth? Youth want their questions heard. They want to see hope modeled. They need leadership opportunities.

While there are no quick, easy, or singular approaches to working with black youth, there can be a framework to offer vital and relevant youth ministry. This book proposes a comprehensive framework that has evolved over ten years of annual youth and family convocations of the Interdenominational Theological Center as well as youth and family forums and activities related to the Youth Hope-Builders Academy of ITC. The framework builds on the image of the congregation as a "village of hope" where pastors and leaders get real to offer the church as a place of support, guidance, and accountability for youth, parents, and other adults who are raising today’s black youth.

Contributors: Daniel O. Black, Philip Dunston, Maisha I. Handy, Michael T. McQueen, Tapiwa Mucherera, Elizabeth J. Walker, Herbert R. Marbury, Annette R. Marbury, and Anne E. Streaty Wimberly

Offers the "village of hope" as a framework where pastors and leaders offer the church as a place of support, guidance, and accountability for youth, parents, and other adults who are raising today’s black youth.

The first edition of Working with Black Youth, edited by Charles R. Foster and Grant S. Shockley, was published in 1989. Since that time the challenges for black youth have only intensified and grown in complexity. A burning question of Black churches continues to be: How can we effectively ministry with our youth? Their world is fast-paced, media-centered, techno-savvy, hip-hop, violent, and plagued with HIV/AIDS. The Church wants to guide youth toward a Christian identity with values for wise decision-making. Youth want their questions heard. They want to see hope modeled. They need leadership opportunities.

While there are no quick, easy, or singular approaches to working with black youth, there can be a framework to offer vital and relevant youth ministry. This book proposes a comprehensive framework that has evolved over ten years of annual youth and family convocations of the Interdenominational Theological Center as well as youth and family forums and activities related to the Youth Hope-Builders Academy of ITC. The framework builds on the image of the congregation as a "village of hope" where pastors and leaders get real to offer the church as a place of support, guidance, and accountability for youth, parents, and other adults who are raising today’s black youth.

Contributors: Daniel O. Black, Philip Dunston, Maisha I. Handy, Michael T. McQueen, Tapiwa Mucherera, Elizabeth J. Walker, Herbert R. Marbury, Annette R. Marbury, and Anne E. Streaty Wimberly


Click for more detail about Benjamin Banneker: Genius of Early America by Lillie Patterson Benjamin Banneker: Genius of Early America

by Lillie Patterson
Abingdon Press (Mar 01, 1978)
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True, young Benjamin’s "eyes fairly danced with excitement," but it’s contagious: this is an inspirational biography so thoroughly conversant with black aspirations and Maryland history (the author is a black Baltimore librarian) and so attentive to the particulars of its hero’s accomplishments as to make him a hero indeed. At six he becomes the proud co-owner of 100 "Crown Colony of Maryland" acres. From the Bible (and his grandmother) he learns to read; a Quaker schoolmaster opens up a "new world" of mathematics, of "parts to be added, divided, made larger or smaller, taken apart and put together again." On Patterson’s part, calculated words. The sight of a watch, and its loan, starts him building "the wonderful wooden clock" that first makes him famous. Educated neighbors, the Quaker Ellicotts, acquaint him with surveying and astronomy; and, at almost 60, he exchanges most of his farm for a lifelong annuity and time to pursue his new interests. Though the account is dramatized, what is invented is not implausible—and what is crucial or controversial is forthrightly stated. Banneker collaborates with Andrew Ellicott in surveying the land for the new capital city; then, after Pierre L’Enfant is dismissed, the two execute his plans. Did Banneker himself redraw the plans from memory? The evidence is lost, we’re informed; sufficient, the ascertainable. But what is most intriguing, and made Banneker still "more famous," is his almanac. From the details of its compilation—complete to original astronomical charts (B. Franklin’s were borrowed)—we come to appreciate its significance in demonstrating (as a publisher’s foreword noted) "that the colour of the skin is in no way connected with strength of mind or intellectual powers." So, BB, "philomath"—in the most meticulously appreciative young biography yet. —Kirkus Review