6 Books Published by Berrett-Koehler Publishers on Our Site — Book Cover Mosaic

Click for more detail about Your Body Is Not an Apology Workbook: Tools for Living Radical Self-Love by Sonya Renee Taylor Your Body Is Not an Apology Workbook: Tools for Living Radical Self-Love

by Sonya Renee Taylor
Berrett-Koehler Publishers (Mar 16, 2021)
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"Poet and activist Taylor (A Little Truth on Your Shirt) packs important ideas into this concise volume on body empowerment. "Radical self-love is not a destination you are trying to get to; it is who you already are," she counsels…The author’s sensible and empathetic tone will lend comfort to readers and help them to see that no matter what their body type, they are beautiful."
Publishers Weekly

"The Body Is Not an Apology wrestles you free from the habit of your shame and declares you whole, right now, just as you are. To follow its revelations and teachings leaves you different on the other side and undoubtedly more yourself."
—Prentis Hemphill, founder and Director, The Black Embodiment Initiative

"From the moment I met Sonya Renee, I knew my life, my world, and the way I view myself and others around me would never be the same. The Body Is Not an Apology is essential reading for those of us who crave understanding and those who are already on the path to learning how beautiful and complex our bodies are. It will empower you with the tools to navigate a world that is often unkind to those of us who whether by choice or design don’t adhere to society’s standard of beauty. Her words will echo in your heart, soul, and body just as they have in mine."
—Tess Holliday, plus model, author, and founder of Eff Your Beauty Standards

"The Body Is Not an Apology is a gift, a blessing, a prayer, a reminder, a sacred text. In it, Taylor invites us to live in a world where different bodies are seen, affirmed, celebrated, and just. Taylor invites us to break up with shame, to deepen our literacy, and to liberate our practice of celebrating every body and never apologizing for this body that is mine and takes care of me so well. This book cracked me open in ways that I’m so grateful for. I know it will do the same for you."
—Alicia Garza, cocreator of the Black Lives Matter Global Network and Strategy + Partnerships Director, National Domestic Workers Alliance

"The Body Is Not an Apology is a radical, merciful, transformational book that will give you deep insights, inspiration, and concrete tools for launching the revolution right inside your own beloved body. Written from deep experience, with a force of catalytic energy and so much love."
—Eve Ensler, author of The Vagina Monologues and In the Body of the World

"In 2017, #thefirsttimeisawmyself was a trending hashtag and Netflix campaign. As a disabled woman, #thefirsttimeireadmyself may well have been this book. Thank you, Sonya. Bought two copies, one for me and one for my daughter."
—Rebecca Cokely, Senior Fellow for Disability Policy, Center for American Progress, disability rights activist, and mom

"Sonya Renee Taylor is a treasure that this world simply does not deserve. The Body Is Not an Apology is the gift of radical love the world needs! We are all better off because of her presence, talent, compassion, and authentic work. Thank you, Sonya, for all that you do."
—Jes Baker, aka The Militant Baker, author of Things No One Will Tell Fat Girls

"In these times, when the search for answers to the mounting injustices in our world seems to confound us, Sonya Renee Taylor offers a simple but powerful place to begin: recovering our relationship with our own bodies. To build a world that works for everyone, we must first make the radical decision to love every facet of ourselves. Through lucid and courageous self-revelation, Taylor shows us how to realize the revolutionary potential of self-love. ’The body is not an apology’ is the mantra we should all embrace."
—Kimberl� Crenshaw, legal scholar and founder and Executive Director, African American Policy Forum


Click for more detail about The Body Is Not an Apology, Second Edition: The Power of Radical Self-Love by Sonya Renee Taylor The Body Is Not an Apology, Second Edition: The Power of Radical Self-Love

by Sonya Renee Taylor
Berrett-Koehler Publishers (Feb 09, 2021)
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Humans are a varied and divergent bunch with all manner of beliefs, morals, and bodies. Systems of oppression thrive off our inability to make peace with difference and injure the relationship we have with our own bodies.

The Body Is Not an Apology offers radical self-love as the balm to heal the wounds inflicted by these violent systems. World-renowned activist and poet Sonya Renee Taylor invites us to reconnect with the radical origins of our minds and bodies and celebrate our collective, enduring strength. As we awaken to our own indoctrinated body shame, we feel inspired to awaken others and to interrupt the systems that perpetuate body shame and oppression against all bodies. When we act from this truth on a global scale, we usher in the transformative opportunity of radical self-love, which is the opportunity for a more just, equitable, and compassionate world--for us all.

This second edition includes stories from Taylor’s travels around the world combating body terrorism and shines a light on the path toward liberation guided by love. In a brand new final chapter, she offers specific tools, actions, and resources for confronting racism, sexism, ableism, homophobia, and transphobia. And she provides a case study showing how radical self-love not only dismantles shame and self-loathing in us but has the power to dismantle entire systems of injustice. Together with the accompanying workbook, Your Body Is Not an Apology, Taylor brings the practice of radical self-love to life.

"This book took my breath away. It’s an unexpected and urgent embrace of truth." —Bren� Brown, Ph.D., author of the New York Times #1 bestseller, Dare to Lead

"Poet and activist Taylor (A Little Truth on Your Shirt) packs important ideas into this concise volume on body empowerment. "Radical self-love is not a destination you are trying to get to; it is who you already are," she counsels…The author’s sensible and empathetic tone will lend comfort to readers and help them to see that no matter what their body type, they are beautiful."
Publishers Weekly

"The Body Is Not an Apology wrestles you free from the habit of your shame and declares you whole, right now, just as you are. To follow its revelations and teachings leaves you different on the other side and undoubtedly more yourself."
—Prentis Hemphill, founder and Director, The Black Embodiment Initiative

"From the moment I met Sonya Renee, I knew my life, my world, and the way I view myself and others around me would never be the same. The Body Is Not an Apology is essential reading for those of us who crave understanding and those who are already on the path to learning how beautiful and complex our bodies are. It will empower you with the tools to navigate a world that is often unkind to those of us who whether by choice or design don’t adhere to society’s standard of beauty. Her words will echo in your heart, soul, and body just as they have in mine."
—Tess Holliday, plus model, author, and founder of Eff Your Beauty Standards

"The Body Is Not an Apology is a gift, a blessing, a prayer, a reminder, a sacred text. In it, Taylor invites us to live in a world where different bodies are seen, affirmed, celebrated, and just. Taylor invites us to break up with shame, to deepen our literacy, and to liberate our practice of celebrating every body and never apologizing for this body that is mine and takes care of me so well. This book cracked me open in ways that I’m so grateful for. I know it will do the same for you."
—Alicia Garza, cocreator of the Black Lives Matter Global Network and Strategy + Partnerships Director, National Domestic Workers Alliance

"The Body Is Not an Apology is a radical, merciful, transformational book that will give you deep insights, inspiration, and concrete tools for launching the revolution right inside your own beloved body. Written from deep experience, with a force of catalytic energy and so much love."
—Eve Ensler, author of The Vagina Monologues and In the Body of the World

"In 2017, #thefirsttimeisawmyself was a trending hashtag and Netflix campaign. As a disabled woman, #thefirsttimeireadmyself may well have been this book. Thank you, Sonya. Bought two copies, one for me and one for my daughter."
—Rebecca Cokely, Senior Fellow for Disability Policy, Center for American Progress, disability rights activist, and mom

"Sonya Renee Taylor is a treasure that this world simply does not deserve. The Body Is Not an Apology is the gift of radical love the world needs! We are all better off because of her presence, talent, compassion, and authentic work. Thank you, Sonya, for all that you do."
—Jes Baker, aka The Militant Baker, author of Things No One Will Tell Fat Girls

"In these times, when the search for answers to the mounting injustices in our world seems to confound us, Sonya Renee Taylor offers a simple but powerful place to begin: recovering our relationship with our own bodies. To build a world that works for everyone, we must first make the radical decision to love every facet of ourselves. Through lucid and courageous self-revelation, Taylor shows us how to realize the revolutionary potential of self-love. ’The body is not an apology’ is the mantra we should all embrace."
—Kimberl� Crenshaw, legal scholar and founder and Executive Director, African American Policy Forum


Click for more detail about Black Fatigue: How Racism Erodes the Mind, Body, and Spirit by Mary-Frances Winters Black Fatigue: How Racism Erodes the Mind, Body, and Spirit

by Mary-Frances Winters
Berrett-Koehler Publishers (Sep 15, 2020)
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This is the first book to define and explore Black fatigue, the intergenerational impact of systemic racism on the physical and psychological health of Black people—and explain why and how society needs to collectively do more to combat its pernicious effects.

Black people, young and old, are fatigued, says award-winning diversity and inclusion leader Mary-Frances Winters. It is physically, mentally, and emotionally draining to continue to experience inequities and even atrocities, day after day, when justice is a God-given and legislated right. And it is exhausting to have to constantly explain this to white people, even—and especially—well-meaning white people, who fall prey to white fragility and too often are unwittingly complicit in upholding the very systems they say they want dismantled.

This book, designed to illuminate the myriad dire consequences of living while Black, came at the urging of Winters’s Black friends and colleagues. Winters describes how in every aspect of life—from economics to education, work, criminal justice, and, very importantly, health outcomes—for the most part, the trajectory for Black people is not improving. It is paradoxical that, with all the attention focused over the last fifty years on social justice and diversity and inclusion, little progress has been made in actualizing the vision of an equitable society.

Black people are quite literally sick and tired of being sick and tired. Winters writes that my hope for this book is that it will provide a comprehensive summary of the consequences of Black fatigue, and awaken activism in those who care about equity and justice—those who care that intergenerational fatigue is tearing at the very core of a whole race of people who are simply asking for what they deserve.


Click for more detail about Inclusive Conversations: Fostering Equity, Empathy, and Belonging Across Differences by Mary-Frances Winters Inclusive Conversations: Fostering Equity, Empathy, and Belonging Across Differences

by Mary-Frances Winters
Berrett-Koehler Publishers (Jul 28, 2020)
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What is impressive is not only how Winters builds a case for the urgency and need for bold, inclusive conversations but that she also gives specific strategies and competencies to turn her theory into practice.
—Dr. Sheila Robinson, publisher and CEO, Diversity Woman Media

Effective dialogue across different dimensions of diversity, such as race, gender, age, religion, or sexual orientation, fosters a sense of belonging and inclusion, which in turn leads to greater productivity, performance, and innovation. Whether in the workplace, faith communities, or educational settings, our differences can tear us apart rather than bring us together if we do not know how to communicate. Recognizing our collective responsibility to earnestly address our differences and increase understanding and empathy will not only enhance organizational goals but will also lead to a healthier, kinder, and more compassionate world.

Award-winning diversity, equity, and inclusion consultant Mary-Frances Winters has been leading workshops on what she calls Bold, Inclusive Conversations for years. In this book she offers specific dialogue strategies to foster greater understanding on the following topics:
- Recognizing the importance of creating equity and sharing power
- Dealing with the fragility of dominant groups—their discomfort in engaging with historically subordinated groups
- Addressing the exhaustion historically marginalized groups feel from constantly explaining their different lived experience
- Exploring how to build trust and create psychologically safe spaces for dialogue
This guide is comprehensive for anyone who wants to break down the barriers that separate us and facilitate discussions on potentially polarizing topics.


Click for more detail about We Can’t Talk about That at Work!: How to Talk about Race, Religion, Politics, and Other Polarizing Topics by Mary-Frances Winters We Can’t Talk about That at Work!: How to Talk about Race, Religion, Politics, and Other Polarizing Topics

by Mary-Frances Winters
Berrett-Koehler Publishers (Apr 23, 2017)
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"Given all the external influences that ultimately impact how we show up in our personal and professional lives, it’s important that we, as organizations and leaders, encourage open dialogue and a safe space to engage. This book provides everything you need to do just that."
—Rohini Anand, PhD, Senior Vice President, Corporate Responsibility, and Global Chief Diversity Officer, Sodexo

"This is the book we have been waiting for. Read it, learn from it, acquire the skills described in it. And then with courage, patience, and practice, you will be prepared to have those difficult but necessary conversations in your workplace."
—Johnnetta Betsch Cole, PhD, President Emerita, Spelman College and Bennett College

"Mary-Frances Winters has done it again! Her real-life examples are compelling, and her ’best practices’ can have an immediate impact on everyone who reads her book."
—Mitchell R. Hammer, PhD, President, Intercultural Development Inventory, LLC; Intercultural Conflict Style Inventory, LLC; and Safe Dialogue, LLC

"I’m very excited about the release of We Can’t Talk about That at Work! The issue of discussing polarizing topics at work is a really tough one. People are not comfortable having uncomfortable conversations. I’m happy that there will finally be a resource to guide us all on how to get comfortable being uncomfortable."
—Michele C. Meyer-Shipp, Esq., Vice President and Chief Diversity Officer, Prudential Financial, Inc.

"This book is a comprehensive, practical, and highly accessible tool for empowering people to have the brave conversations that are needed in these tumultuous times. Mary-Frances has given readers an invaluable resource for organizations and individuals to navigate the charged times that we live in and make a contribution toward cocreating a more compassionate future."
—Nene Molefi, diversity and inclusion thought leader and CEO, Mandate Molefi

"Mary-Frances Winters’s wisdom shines throughout this book. She helps us understand deeply why we need to talk about polarizing topics—yes, at work—and then proceeds to show us how with care, concern, and compassion for those who may not agree with us. I hope that all leaders and employees read it and implement her wise suggestions and counsel."
—Julie O’Mara, coauthor of Global Diversity and Inclusion Benchmarks and other inclusion works and Past-President, American Society for Training & Development (now ATD)

"We are living in times of crisis. Day after day, we are confronted with polarization about issues of real import to our society and our world that can seem difficult, if not impossible, to talk about. And yet this is not a time for timidity. We must talk about these issues if we are going to cross the great divides in our ideologies and exist together in civil society. Mary-Frances Winters has created an extremely helpful guide for better understanding and navigating those difficult conversations. Be bold—use this book!"
—Howard Ross, founder and Chief Learning Officer, Cook Ross

"We Can’t Talk about That at Work! has hit the mark. This body of work is critically important to advancing inclusion and dialogue in our workplaces. As we work diligently to increase our diversity, we struggle with inclusion and having the difficult conversations about the various aspects of diversity. Now, we have a road map and tools to support diversity professionals, leaders, and employees in any work environment. This will be the book used by all."
—Darlene Slaughter, Vice President and Chief Diversity Officer, United Way Worldwide

"In the current global political and social climate, characterized by increasingly polarized views, the ability to embrace views different from our own, without judgment or vilification, is more critical than ever. It is also at the heart of all diversity and inclusion work. For with all our ideals, we often overlook the fact that diversity and inclusion can be hard. In We Can’t Talk about That at Work!, Mary-Frances addresses this issue head-on, providing practical skills to empower leaders and managers to have effective dialogue across difference."
—Kate Vernon, Director, Strategic Programmes, Community Business

"The presidential farewell address is a perfect way to set up this powerful and practical guide to effectively engaging in conversations about polarizing issues. I too believe that we need to meet people where they are, and not expect them to necessarily see the world from our view, and that we all have work to do to close the cultural divide and change hearts. What makes this book different is its soft approach to bold conversations, using talking tips, templates, and reflection questions."
—Tyronne Stoudemire, Vice President of Global Diversity and Inclusion, Hyatt Hotels Corporation, and Adjunct Lecturer of Management and Organization, Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University

"Whether in her writing, public speaking, or consulting, Mary-Frances Winters always delivers. Deep subject matter expertise, strategic thinking, sociocultural insights, contemporary application, and wisdom will spill out of these pages as you engage with it."
—Andr�s Tapia, Senior Client Partner and Global Practice Leader, Workforce Performance, Inclusion and Diversity, Korn Ferry Hay Group, and author of The Inclusion Paradox


Click for more detail about The Sisters Are Alright: Changing the Broken Narrative of Black Women in America by Tamara Winfrey Harris The Sisters Are Alright: Changing the Broken Narrative of Black Women in America

by Tamara Winfrey Harris
Berrett-Koehler Publishers (Jul 07, 2015)
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The Sisters Are Alright is first of all a love note Tamara Winfrey Harris has written to other black women. It’s a warm, welcoming book that celebrates their complexities and humanity. I hope Harris’ book will be a gift given to many young black girls. I read this book to understand the specific lived experience of black women in the United States, become a better ally and just rejoice in the celebration of women of color.—Bina, Reviewed at: If You Can Read This
GOLD MEDALIST OF FOREWORD REVIEWS’ 2015 INDIEFAB AWARDS IN WOMEN’s STUDIES

What’s wrong with black women? Not a damned thing!

The Sisters Are Alright exposes anti black-woman propaganda and shows how real black women are pushing back against distorted cartoon versions of themselves.

When African women arrived on American shores, the three-headed hydra servile Mammy, angry Sapphire, and lascivious Jezebel followed close behind. In the ’60s, the Matriarch, the willfully unmarried baby machine leeching off the state, joined them. These stereotypes persist to this day through newspaper headlines, Sunday sermons, social media memes, cable punditry, government policies, and hit song lyrics. Emancipation may have happened more than 150 years ago, but America still won’t let a sister be free from this coven of caricatures.

Tamara Winfrey Harris delves into marriage, motherhood, health, sexuality, beauty, and more, taking sharp aim at pervasive stereotypes about black women. She counters warped prejudices with the straight-up truth about being a black woman in America. We have facets like diamonds, she writes. The trouble is the people who refuse to see us sparkling.