2 Books Published by Diasporic Africa Press on Our Site — Book Cover Mosaic

Click for more detail about Marvel’s Black Panther: A Comic Book Biography, From Stan Lee to Ta-Nehisi Coates by Todd Steven Burroughs Marvel’s Black Panther: A Comic Book Biography, From Stan Lee to Ta-Nehisi Coates

by Todd Steven Burroughs
Diasporic Africa Press (Feb 14, 2018)
Read Detailed Book Description


Created by Marvel Comics Legends Stan Lee and Jack Kirby, The Black Panther is considered the first Black superhero in American mainstream comics. Through a textual analysis, this book narrates the history of the character from his first appearance in 1966—the same year, the Black Panther Party was formed in Oakland, California—through Ta-Nehisi Coates’ version in 2015. It tells the story of how Black and white writers envisioned the character between those years, as a Patrice Lumumba to a Sidney Poitier to a Nelson Mandela to a hip-hop cool to a reflective, 21st century king. Along the way, the limitations of white liberalism and the boundless nature of the Black imagination are revealed. Marvel’s Black Panther is the first textual study of a superhero comic book character, examining its writers and the stories they have created over a fifty year period.

Book Review

Click for more detail about Warrior Princess: A People’s Biography of Ida B. Wells by Todd Steven Burroughs Warrior Princess: A People’s Biography of Ida B. Wells

by Todd Steven Burroughs
Diasporic Africa Press (Dec 15, 2017)
Read Detailed Book Description


Warrior Princess: A People’s Biography of Ida B. Wells is the story of a young Black woman who decided to fight and protect Black people her entire life, and did so admirably. Ida B. Wells was a prominent journalist, activist, and suffragist who lived in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. She was defiant, courageous, and committed to her life’s work. For that reason, she endured violent threats from racist white men, and was ostracized by many Black male leaders. She spoke, wrote, and organized. But more importantly, she learned to believe in herself and her mission. As Wells herself wrote: “Let the Afro-American depend on no party, but on himself, for his salvation.”