3 Books Published by Other Press on Our Site — Book Cover Mosaic

Click for more detail about The Hundred Wells of Salaga: A Novel by Ayesha Harruna Attah The Hundred Wells of Salaga: A Novel

by Ayesha Harruna Attah
Other Press (Feb 05, 2019)
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Based on true events, a story of courage, forgiveness, love, and freedom in precolonial Ghana, told through the eyes of two women born to vastly different fates.

Aminah lives an idyllic life until she is brutally separated from her home and forced on a journey that transforms her from a daydreamer into a resilient woman. Wurche, the willful daughter of a chief, is desperate to play an important role in her father’s court. These two women’s lives converge as infighting among Wurche’s people threatens the region, during the height of the slave trade at the end of the nineteenth century.

Through the experiences of Aminah and Wurche, The Hundred Wells of Salaga offers a remarkable view of slavery and how the scramble for Africa affected the lives of everyday people.


Click for more detail about My Brother Moochie: Regaining Dignity in the Midst of Crime, Poverty, and Racism in the American South by Issac J. Bailey My Brother Moochie: Regaining Dignity in the Midst of Crime, Poverty, and Racism in the American South

by Issac J. Bailey
Other Press (May 29, 2018)
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A rare first-person account that combines a journalist’s skilled reporting with the raw emotion of a younger brother’s heartfelt testimony of what his family endured for decades after his eldest brother killed a man and was sentenced to life in prison.

At the age of nine, Issac J. Bailey saw his hero, his eldest brother, taken away in handcuffs, not to return from prison for thirty-two years. Bailey tells the story of their relationship and of his experience living in a family suffering guilt and shame. Drawing on sociological research as well as his expertise as a journalist, he seeks to answerthe crucial question of why Moochie and many other young black men—including half of the ten boys in his own family—end up in the criminal justice system. What role did poverty, race, and faith play? What effect did living in the South, in the Bible Belt, have? And why is their experience understood as a trope for black men, while white people who commit crimes are never seen in this generalized way?

My Brother Moochie provides a wide-ranging yet intensely intimateview of crime and incarceration in the United States, and the devastatingeffects on the incarcerated, their loved ones, their victims, andsociety as a whole.


Click for more detail about The Meursault Investigation by Kamel Daoud The Meursault Investigation

by Kamel Daoud
Other Press (Jun 02, 2015)
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A New York Times Notable Book of 2015†—†Michiko Kakutani, The Top Books of 2015,†New York Times†—†TIME Magazine†Top Ten Books of 2015†—†Publishers Weekly†Best Books of the Year†—†Financial Times†Best Books of the Year

“A tour-de-force reimagining of Camus’s†The Stranger, from the point of view of the mute Arab victims.”†—The New Yorker

He was the brother of “the Arab” killed by the infamous Meursault, the antihero of Camus’s classic novel. Seventy years after that event, Harun, who has lived since childhood in the shadow of his sibling’s memory, refuses to let him remain anonymous: he gives his brother a story and a name—Musa—and describes the events that led to Musa’s casual murder on a dazzlingly sunny beach.
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In a bar in Oran, night after night, he ruminates on his solitude, on his broken heart, on his anger with men desperate for a god, and on his disarray when faced with a country that has so disappointed him. A stranger among his own people, he wants to be granted, finally, the right to die.
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The Stranger is of course central to Daoud’s story, in which he both endorses and criticizes one of the most famous novels in the world. A worthy complement to its great predecessor, The Meursault Investigation is not only a profound meditation on Arab identity and the disastrous effects of colonialism in Algeria, but also a stunning work of literature in its own right, told in a unique and affecting voice.