3 Books Published by Steerforth on AALBC — Book Cover Collage

Click for more detail about Big Towns, Big Talk: Poems by Patricia Smith Big Towns, Big Talk: Poems

by Patricia Smith
Steerforth (Sep 16, 2002)
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Life According to Motown, Patricia Smith’s first book, told of the glittery deceptions of the Motown era and the difficulties of growing up under their sway. Big Towns, Big Talk†takes a look at what happens after you’ve grown up.


Click for more detail about In the Shadow of a Saint: A Son’s Journey to Understand His Father’s Legacy by Ken Wiwa In the Shadow of a Saint: A Son’s Journey to Understand His Father’s Legacy

by Ken Wiwa
Steerforth (Sep 09, 2001)
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In late 1995, the little-known Ogoni region in Nigeria became a fable for our times. Ken Saro-Wiwa, a renowned poet and environmentalist, was campaigning to protect his Ogoni people against the encroachments of Shell Oil and a brutal dictatorship. He was imprisoned, tortured, brought to trial on trumped-up charges, and executed.

At the heart of the public campaign to save Ken Saro-Wiwa was another Ken Wiwa—the author’s son—who travelled the world lobbying world leaders and mobilizing public opinion, so that his father was recognized as a hero and a symbol of the struggle for environmental justice. The Saro-Wiwa name became global currency for righteousness.

Ken Wiwa has embarked on a book that tells the story—from a human, anecdotal perspective—of what it means to grow up as a child in the shadow of such extraordinary men and women. In the end, it’s about Ken’s attempts to make peace with himself and his father—following his journey as he reaches toward a final rendezvous with the father who was snatched by the hangman.


Click for more detail about Close To Death: Poems by Patricia Smith Close To Death: Poems

by Patricia Smith
Steerforth (Jun 01, 1998)
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Homicide, drug abuse, and AIDS-related deaths have forced black male life expectancy into a steady decline. In New York City, black males have long been considered expendable. Young men who feel they have run out of options, whose bravado indicates they are no longer afraid to die, wear baseball caps emblazoned with "C2D," for close to death. This chilling cry comes from those who expect to lose their lives violently without ever having a chance to live. Close to Death, a book of poems amplifying the voices and souls of black men at various stages of their lives, is a poetic requiem for those who struggle against the odds, for those who have resigned themselves to death, and for those already gone.