11 Books Published by The Feminist Press at CUNY on Our Site — Book Cover Mosaic

Click for more detail about I Love Myself When I Am Laughing… and Then Again When I Am Looking Mean and Impressive: A Zora Neale Hurston Reader by Alice Walker I Love Myself When I Am Laughing… and Then Again When I Am Looking Mean and Impressive: A Zora Neale Hurston Reader

by Alice Walker
The Feminist Press at CUNY (Jan 07, 2020)
Read Detailed Book Description

A collection of essays, fiction, journalism, folklore, and autobiography, preserving the legacy of one of the Harlem Renaissance’s greatest writers.


Click for more detail about Training School for Negro Girls by Camille Acker Training School for Negro Girls

by Camille Acker
The Feminist Press at CUNY (Oct 23, 2018)
Read Detailed Book Description


"This flawlessly executed work reinvigorates the short fiction genre." —BUST "Acker perfectly captures the varied experiences of her characters, making clear that each of [their] lives is worth exploring individually, and valued as being one shining part of the ocean of human experience." —NYLON When you’re black and female in America, society’s rules were never meant to make you safe or free. Camille Acker’s relatable yet unexpected characters break down the walls of respectability politics, showing that the only way for black women to be free is to be themselves.


Click for more detail about The Crunk Feminist Collection by Brittney Cooper The Crunk Feminist Collection

by Brittney Cooper
The Feminist Press at CUNY (Jan 10, 2017)
Read Detailed Book Description


For the Crunk Feminist Collective, their academic day jobs were lacking in conversations they actually wanted—relevant, real conversations about how race and gender politics intersect with pop culture and current events. To address this void, they started a blog. Now with an annual readership of nearly one million, their posts foster dialogue about activist methods, intersectionality, and sisterhood. And the writers’ personal identities—as black women; as sisters, daughters, and lovers; and as television watchers, sports fans, and music lovers—are never far from the discussion at hand.These essays explore "Sex and Power in the Black Church," discuss how "Clair Huxtable is Dead," list "Five Ways Talib Kweli Can Become a Better Ally to Women in Hip Hop," and dwell on "Dating with a Doctorate (She Got a Big Ego?)." Self-described as "critical homegirls," the authors tackle life stuck between loving hip hop and ratchet culture while hating patriarchy, misogyny, and sexism.Brittney Cooper is an assistant professor at Rutgers University. In addition to a weekly column in Salon.com, her words have appeared in the New York Times, the Washington Post, Cosmo.com, and many others. In 2013 and 2014, she was named to the Root.com’s Root 100, an annual list of Top Black Influencers.Susana M. Morris received her Ph.D. from Emory University and is currently an associate professor of English at Auburn University.Robin M. Boylorn is assistant professor at the University of Alabama. She is the author of the award-winning monograph Sweetwater: Black Women and Narratives of Resilience (Peter Lang, 2013).


Click for more detail about Into The Go-Slow by Bridgett M. Davis Into The Go-Slow

by Bridgett M. Davis
The Feminist Press at CUNY (Sep 09, 2014)
Read Detailed Book Description


It’s 1986 and twenty-one-year-old Angie continues to mourn the death of her brilliant and radical sister Ella. On impulse, she travels from Detroit to the place where Ella tragically died four years before?Nigeria. She retraces her sister’s steps, all the while navigating the chaotic landscape of a major African country on the brink of democracy careening toward a coup d’état.At the center of this quest is a love affair that upends everything Angie thought she knew about herself. Against a backdrop of Nigeria’s infamous go-slow?traffic as wild and surprising as a Fela lyric?Angie begins to unravel the mysteries of the past, and opens herself up to love and life after Ella.Bridgett M. Davis’s debut novel Shifting Through Neutral (Amistad, 2004) was a Borders Books ?Original Voices” selection and a finalist for the 2005 Zora Neale Hurston/Richard Wright LEGACY Award. Davis was selected as the New Author of the Year by Go On Girl! Book Club?the largest national reading group for African American women. She currently writes for O, The Oprah Magazine and other publications.


Click for more detail about His Own Where by June Jordan His Own Where

by June Jordan
The Feminist Press at CUNY (May 01, 2010)
Read Detailed Book Description


?This June Jordan treasure is a rare piece of fiction from one of America’s most vital poets and political essayists—a tender story of young love in the face of generational opposition, a modern-day Romeo and Juliet that sings and sways.”—Walter Mosley"There must be bridges if we are to reach our young. His Own Where promises to be one."—New York Times Book Review (1971)Nominated for a National Book Award in 1971, His Own Where is the story of Buddy, a fifteen-year-old boy whose world is spinning out of control. He meets Angela, whose angry parents accuse her of being "wild." When life falls apart for Buddy and his father, and when Angela is attacked at home, they take action to create their own way of staying alive in Brooklyn. In the process, the two find refuge in one another and learn that love is real and necessary. His Own Where was one of The New York Times’ Most Outstanding Books and was on the American Library Association’s list of Best Books in 1971.June Jordan was a poet, essayist, journalist, dramatist, activist, and educator known for challenging oppression through her inspirational words and actions. She was the founder of Poetry for the People at the University of California, Berkeley, where she taught for many years. The author of over twenty books, her poetry is collected in Directed by Desire; her selected essays in Some of Us Did Not Die. Sapphire is the author of American Dreams, Black Wings & Blind Angels, and Push, which has been made into a motion picture called Precious.


Click for more detail about To Stir The Heart: Four African Stories (Two By Two) by Bessie Head and Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o To Stir The Heart: Four African Stories (Two By Two)

by Bessie Head and Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o
The Feminist Press at CUNY (Jun 01, 2007)
Read Detailed Book Description


From origin myths to tales of modern prostitutes in search of dignity—even for only a moment—these powerful stories by two renowned African authors explore the uneasy coexistence between women and men, tradition and modernity. They show strong women demanding their right to marry or not, earn a living, and most importantly, be respected.South African-born Bessie Head (1937–1986) immigrated to Botswana, where she is considered their most important writer. Ngugi wa Thiong’o is a major Kenyan writer now living in the United States. He teaches and directs an international writing center at the University of California, Irvine.


Click for more detail about Daddy Was A Number Runner (Contemporary Classics By Women) by Louise Meriwether Daddy Was A Number Runner (Contemporary Classics By Women)

by Louise Meriwether
The Feminist Press at CUNY (Dec 01, 2002)
Read Detailed Book Description


Recently chosen by Essence magazine, this beloved modern classic tells the poignant story of a spirited young woman’s coming of age in -Depression-era Harlem. While 12-year-old Francie Coffin’s world and family threaten to fall apart, this remarkable young heroine must call upon her own wit and endurance to survive amidst the treacheries of racism and sexism, poverty and violence. "The novel’s greatest achievement lies in the strong sense of black life that it conveys: the vitality and force behind the despair . . . a most -important novel."—New York Times Book Review


Click for more detail about The Living Is Easy by Dorothy West The Living Is Easy

by Dorothy West
The Feminist Press at CUNY (Jul 01, 1995)
Read Detailed Book Description


One of only a handful of novels published by black women during the forties, the story of ambitious Cleo Judson is a long-time cult classic. The Living Is Easy is delightfully wry and ironic humor—even bitchiness—of the novel coexists with a challenging moral and social complexity.

"A powerful work."—Essence

"Dorothy West is a brisk storyteller with an eye for ironic detail…a deft stylist and writer of social satire."—Ms.

"Long beloved for its wry and ironic humor, this novel continues to delight and challenge readers."—Feminist Bookstore News

* Alternate of the Book-of-the-Month and Quality Paperback Book Clubs *

Suggested for course use in:
African-American studies
20th-century U.S. literature


Click for more detail about Reena And Other Stories: Including The Novella Reena And Other Stories: Including The Novella "Merle"

by Paule Marshall
The Feminist Press at CUNY (Jan 01, 1993)
Read Detailed Book Description


   This collection of Paule Marshall’s short works illustrates the growth of a remarkable writer. For the first time these stories, long out of print or difficult to obtain, appear together in a single volume. Introducing the volume is Marshall’s much acclaimed autobiographical essay, "From the Poets in the Kitchen" from the New York Times Book Review’s series called "The Making of a Writer." This collection included newly written autobiographical headnotes to each story and "Merle," a novella excerpted from Marshall’s 1969 novel, The Chosen Place, The Timeless People, and extensively reshaped and rewritten for this collection. It stands as an independent story about one of the most memorable women in contemporary fiction.


Click for more detail about I Love Myself When I Am Laughing And Then Again When I Am Looking Mean & Impressive by Zora Neale Hurston I Love Myself When I Am Laughing And Then Again When I Am Looking Mean & Impressive

by Zora Neale Hurston
The Feminist Press at CUNY (Jan 01, 1979)
Read Detailed Book Description


The most prolific African-American woman author from 1920 to 1950, Hurston was praised for her writing and condemned for her independence, arrogance, and audaciousness. This unique anthology, with fourteen superb examples of her fiction, journalism, folklore, and autobiography, rightfully establishes her as the intellectual and spiritual leader of the next generation of black writers. The original commentary by Alice Walker and Mary Helen Washington, two African-American writers in the forefront of the Hurston revival, provide illuminating insights into Hurstonthe writer, and the personas well as into American social and cultural history.




Our website is made possible by displaying online advertisements to our visitors.
Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker.