4 Books Published by University of Alberta Press on Our Site — Book Cover Mosaic

Click for more detail about An Autobiography of the Autobiography of Reading by Dionne Brand An Autobiography of the Autobiography of Reading

by Dionne Brand
University of Alberta Press (Mar 17, 2020)
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"The geopolitics of empire had already prepared me for this…coloniality constructs outsides and insides, worlds to be chosen, disturbed, interpreted and navigated - in order to live something like a real self."

Internationally acclaimed poet and novelist Dionne Brand reflects on her early reading of colonial literature and how it makes Black being inanimate. She explores her encounters with colonial, imperialist, and racist tropes; the ways that practices of reading and writing are shaped by those narrative structures; and the challenges of writing a narrative of Black life that attends to its own expression and its own consciousness.

Co-published with Canadian Literature Centre / Centre de litt?rature canadienne

CLC Kreisel Lecture Series


Click for more detail about 100 Days  by Juliane Okot Bitek 100 Days

by Juliane Okot Bitek
University of Alberta Press (Apr 01, 2016)
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100 days.
100 days that should not have been.
100 days the world could have stopped. But did not.For 100 days, Juliane Okot Bitek recorded the lingering nightmare of the Rwandan genocide in a poem-each poem recalling the senseless loss of life and of innocence. Okot Bitek draws on her own family’s experience of displacement under the regime of Idi Amin, pulling in fragments of the poetic traditions she encounters along the way: the Ugandan Acholi oral tradition of her father-the poet Okot p’Bitek; Anglican hymns; the rhythms and sounds of slave songs from the Americas; and the beat of spoken word and hip-hop. 100 Days is a collection of poetry that will stop you in your tracks.


Click for more detail about Dreaming of Elsewhere: Observations on Home by Esi Edugyan Dreaming of Elsewhere: Observations on Home

by Esi Edugyan
University of Alberta Press (Apr 01, 2014)
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Home, for me, was not a birthright, but an invention.. It seems to me when we speak of home we are speaking of several things, often at once, muddled together into an uneasy stew. We say home and mean origins, we say home and mean belonging. These are two different things: where we come from, and where we are.

Writing about belonging is not a simple task. Esi Edugyan chooses to intertwine fact and fiction, objective and subjective in an effort to find out if one can belong to more than one place, if home is just a place or if it can be an idea, a person, a memory, or a dream. How "home" changes, how it changes us, and how every farewell carries the promise of a return. Readers of Canadian literature, armchair travellers, and all citizens of the global village will enjoy her explorations and reflections, as we follow her from Ghana to Germany, from Toronto to Budapest, from Paris to New York.


Click for more detail about Dear Sir, I Intend To Burn Your Book: An Anatomy Of A Book Burning (Henry Kreisel Memorial Lecture) by Lawrence Hill Dear Sir, I Intend To Burn Your Book: An Anatomy Of A Book Burning (Henry Kreisel Memorial Lecture)

by Lawrence Hill
University of Alberta Press (Apr 11, 2013)
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Censorship and book burning are still present in our lives. Lawrence Hill shares his experiences of how ignorance and the fear of ideas led a group in the Netherlands to burn the cover of his widely successful novel, The Book of Negroes, in 2011. Why do books continue to ignite such strong reactions in people in the age of the Internet? Is banning, censoring, or controlling book distribution ever justified? Hill illustrates his ideas with anecdotes and lists names of Canadian writers who faced censorship challenges in the twenty-first century, inviting conversation between those on opposite sides of these contentious issues. All who are interested in literature, freedom of expression, and human rights will enjoy reading Hill’s provocative essay.



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