4 Books Published by Writers and Readers Publishing on Our Site — Book Cover Mosaic

Click for more detail about A Windy Day by Laura Pegram A Windy Day

by Laura Pegram
Black Butterfly Childrens’ Books (Feb 01, 1995)
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During a fun-filled outing to the park with her family, a three-year-old girl delights in the mischievous, unpredictable behavior of the playful wind.


Click for more detail about Big Friend, Little Friend by Eloise Greenfield Big Friend, Little Friend

by Eloise Greenfield
Black Butterfly Childrens’ Books (Aug 01, 1991)
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Book by Greenfield, Eloise


Click for more detail about Soft Song by S. Pearl Sharp Soft Song

by S. Pearl Sharp
The Harlem River Press (May 28, 1991)
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Saundra Sharp’s third collection of poetry marries word and image, featuring full color reproductions of fine art by nine artists.

Sharp is the type of woman who creates her own definition. Love is very important to this writer, so is her independence and demand for respect. Sharp’s poetry brings the candles and the wine, it’s poetry for that special moment.


Click for more detail about Typing in the Dark by S. Pearl Sharp Typing in the Dark

by S. Pearl Sharp
The Harlem River Press (May 01, 1991)
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Sharp’s fourth published volume of poetry includes photographs by Calvin R. Hicks, Nathaniel Bellamy, Gerald Cyrus, Adele Hodge, and Sharp. Cover photo by Calvin R. Hicks.

We Still Write Love Poems

We still write love poems
because in the deepest

most resonant part

of our collective spirit

We won’t let love

be taken away from us.

because it keeps hate
from getting out of hand
because We have
tenure in forgiveness
and tenderness
as plentiful as mornings.
so pin a poem to the lynching tree
dance a dance for the spirits at sea

give honor to the tribes of Surinam
sound the horn for the Bloods of ‘Nam

beat the drum for Amistad
blow the sax for Soledad

ring the bell for the Black Star Line
create a praisesong for the Little Rock 9

write rhyme for the daughters of Birmingham
make word dance on the graves of Klan

haiku for the minds that went away
sing the song for Marvin Gaye
stomp down strong for Soweto
throw the bones for old Jim Crow

lay hands on Boston and Bensonhurst
chant a chant for democracy’s curse

juba back the pain, the fear
record the way of our survival here

We still write love poems
because it heals us
coming slow in the day
or late in the life
bandaging pain and absence

because love is the ground on which
our soul dances
the breath of the womb
the silence hovering over the grave
We still write love poems

—S. Pearl Sharp