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Chevdove

Women with Their Own Naturally Abundant Type 4C Hair— Understanding True African Kinky Hair

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Women with Their Own Naturally Abundant Type 4C Hair—

Understanding True African Kinky Hair

 

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That Sister.com

 Did you know that not all Afro hair is the same? Depending on the look, feel and texture, there are various

groups your hair can fall into. We as black women generally have what is called type 4 hair. This is kinky hair,

rather than it being straight or with light curls.

https://www.thatsister.com/what-are-4a-4b-and-4c-hair-types-answers-and-picture-examples-inside/

 

Okay, so as I touched upon this subject in another post in that, this statement and many other definitions about Black African ‘Kinky’ Hair byway of Black people happens to be misleading, based on my research. More specifically, the definitions of the different TYPE 4 Hair types seem to be wrong, with the exception of the 4C Hair Type. And perhaps this following diagram may help to better explain my query:

 

Hair-types-chart-1-2a-2b-2c-3a-3b-3c-4a-

 

 

 

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In this diagram, both 4A and 4C look ‘curly’ with only 4C being smaller curls, but the actual depiction of 4B would be the closest depiction what A KINKY HAIR STRAND would look like under a microscope. So, in essence, this diagram floating around on the internet seems to be wrong and the 4B strand should probably be 4C. In a particular video published by, Craving Curly Kinks, September 12, 2018, titled, Are you Type 4c or Type 4b? Showing The Difference, two young children were featured to demonstrate the difference between 4B and 4C and the Black woman narrator attempted to explain that 4C HAIR knots at the end but 4B HAIR does not. She also stated that 4B HAIR draws up more than 4C HAIR when it becomes wet with water, however, both of these statements are misleading. In the initial reference by ‘That Sister.com’, another confusing statement was made:

 

What is Type 4 Afro Hair (Kinky)?

Type 4 hair is the hair type that most black women have. This kind of hair is kinky, extremely wiry, has tight coils and is very fragile.

https://www.thatsister.com/what-are-4a-4b-and-4c-hair-types-answers-and-picture-examples-inside/

 

Why the Natural Hair Type Chart is Flawed and Misleading!

FLAWED.png

 

Well, I guess in terms of people of African descent in the western part of the globe, the term ‘Black’ could apply generally, but in the east world, there are many Black Aboriginal people in Australia and in the Fiji Islands and more, that also express straight-type hair and loose curly hair and have intermixed with African people that have migrated to this world and show combination hair types as well. However, in terms of Type 4 Afro Hair meaning ‘Kinky’, the reference above used the term tight coils’, but this would be wrong. If a person’s natural hair expresses both a ‘kinky texture’ and ‘tight coils’ then, that would mean they have COMBINATION HAIR. Wet Kinky Hair shrinks when wet and some will show a wavy or curly pattern but eventually the hair will become kinky in its natural state. All Kinky Hair goes through A PROCESS OF NAPPING’ not coiling and, this would be the distinction. Wooly Hair, or bushy, or kinky, ‘cushy’, ‘extreme fuzzy’ [i.e. Fez], ‘frizzly’, … or nappy hair does not coil, and if kinky hair does ‘coil’ then, that would mean it would not be kinky but may also show a ‘combination hair type’. For this reason, too, the 4A Hair type definition would actually be a contradiction too. It only looks like smaller curls [i.e. coils] apart from the Curly Hair Type Class 3C and therefore denser. So, all in all, with respect to the TYPE 4 HAIR TYPES; 4A should simply be 3D in the curly hair type because it would just be smaller coils. So, some 4 TYPES described in many videos should actually be perhaps listed as a combination hair type for a kinky/curly hair texture becomes obvious. This would be why in many videos, they show Black women being confused on how to define their own hair type by the definitions offered on the internet. Think about the early Jerry Curls’ in that African people can have chemical curls but without the activation cream, the hair still shows that it still naps! But White people, Asiatic-typed people and many Black people and etc. can have very small curly hair too, but unless they are obviously intermixed with a recent Black African parent or perhaps grandparent with nappy hair then, their hair will not nap:

 

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Combination—Kinky/Curly

 

 

curls-understood-kinky-coily-hair-styles

 

Combination—Kinky/Curly/Wavy

 

 

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I would class this hair texture as 3C/4A Curly, based on the given Hair Chart on internet

 

 

Also omitted from these definitions would be that some Black African people can have combination ‘straight-type hair’ or ‘wavy-type hair’ and kinky!—with no curls! This combination wavy/kinky [i.e. 2B/4C] hair type can be seen in some early indigenous peoples’ depictions as well.

 

So therefore, the 4C HAIR TYPE [incorrectly shown as 4B] would actually be the only ‘kinky hair type’ shown by these internet diagrams. And so, it would be this type of ‘JAGGERED HAIR STRAND’ [ZIGZAG Hair Strand pattern] that should be divided into various kinds of kinky hair types and thus distinguished based upon LOOSER ZIGZAG versus TIGHTER ZIGZAG STRAND PATTERNS, and also kinky/curly or kinky/wavy combination hair types and more. Therefore, 4A should not be included as ‘a kinky type’ because it has no kinky texture. Again, kinky 4C hair types should thus define how tightly or loosely the hair strand appears ‘in an angle’, and how tight the hair kinks or naps. The woman in the video mentioned above, Crazy Curly Kinks, used the word ‘knot at the end of the 4C hair, however, this was actually the process of 4C hair napping and of which the other child’s hair would do also to a varied degree as it becomes dryer. It would be this ‘zigzag’ strand pattern that actually causes African hair to become kinky or nap! However, a more scientific term for this process of napping the hair would also be ‘LOCKING’ and so, the zigzag hair strands not only ‘lock’ but ‘interlock’. However, in terms of ‘NAP’ this would also be a term used, even in ancient times, with regards to the different degrees of ‘NAPPING A RUG’ and so, the term ‘RUG’ [i.e. SERUG, REGGAE (REGI—KING), RAG DOLLS, RAGGEDY ANN & BLACK MAMMY BELOVED BELINDA, RAG HEAD… RAG TIME] would be yet another major term used in ancient Iran [i.e. Persia] and beyond to describe the Black African-type presence in the land and in their association with the massive trade and skill of Persian Rug making. Some of these terms also became connected to mugs or cups in ancient times. In fact, this term ‘RUG’ and even the term ‘NAPPY’ became derogatory in some respects as it was passed down through time but nevertheless, the actual distinction of Black African-typed wooly hair has been clearly defined in ancient times but today, this distinction has not been clarified even amongst Black African people. Howbeit, the importance of getting a better understanding on the true nature of Black African Wooly, Bushy, Kinky… hair should not be downplayed because it has been a direct correlation to how Black African-typed people have been identified and oppressed.

 

Raggedy Ann

Further characters such as Beloved Belindy, a black mammy doll, were featured as dolls and characters in books. [1][2][3]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raggedy_Ann

 

raggedy-ann-helps-beloved-belindy-refill

 

 

 

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VINTAGE BELOVED BELINDA

$300.00 Ebay

 

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BLACK ANN & ANDY~ Primitive Folk Art – PICCLICKIMG.com

 

http://www.trinachow.com/blog/images/2007/07_07/belindy2.jpg

Original BELOVED BELINDA, RAGGEDY ANDY & RAGGEDY ANN

$995.00--SOLD

 

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I dated a model for a few years when I was much younger. She was on the cover of magazines and the like.  In her photo shoots she always wore a wigs.

 

One magazine was a Black hair care magazine she was in the cover wearing a wig.  I found this to be misleading, because the article covered hair care not wig wearing.

 

I write all this to explain @Chevdove that I do not believe all women in the photos you posted are sporting their own natural hair.  As a result, it is difficult to get into a discussion of this type if you don't believe the source information...

 

But I get why women love to talk about this stuff.  I presented at a Bloggers conference one.  It was 90% women.  Interestingly most wore their hair in what appeared to me to be natural styles, and many were quite attractive. To my disappointment about 1/3 of the Bloggers wrote about hair.  There was this really popular Blogger they were all seemingly attempting to emulate, because they kept bringing her name up (I wish I could remember her name).  At any rate, the whole event was boring to me -- thought the women seemed to enjoy themselves. 

 

I can't understand women's fixation with hair. I'm not passing judgment. I'm just making an observation.  I don't get people obsession with baseball either. In every relationship I've been in my partner invested a lot of time, energy, money, and emotions over there hair. 

 

And boy, whenever I was asked how I thought their hair looked the answer must be "It looks great honey!" and I better say it, with feeling, like I mean it too :-) 

 

 

 

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18 hours ago, Troy said:

I do not believe all women in the photos you posted are sporting their own natural hair. 

 

@Troy Yes, I understand!

 

I tried though, to pick the ones I felt were natural, however, I do question one or two that I posted.

But, based on my own hair, I really believe that the first set of pics I posted were really natural.

 

Aside from this issue though, I believe that the HAIR CHART posted on the internet is very important to share because it is definitely wrong.

I wonder who put that out? 

I know it could not have been from a reliable source, because I was trained on this subject in a lab and know for a certainty that this chart is wrong.

Nevertheless, it is the one that seemingly African AMericans are using. That is crazy. 

 

 

18 hours ago, Troy said:

I can't understand women's fixation with hair. I'm not passing judgment. I'm just making an observation. 

 

Yeah, vanity I guess. This is true for Black women, White women, Asian women and etc., I guess. 

I think a lot of money is spent on hair products and hair styling.

Even though it's been over 30 years since I've been to a beauty salon, I would go though, if I had the money because I remember how it felt to have 

my hair washed and massaged. 

 

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Funny @Chevdove I'd not considered the reason to be as simple as vanity -- maybe you are correct.  

 

Sure this is not only a Black woman's problem. I Image hair care is a multi-billion dollar industry. 

 

I don't doubt having someone else pamper you by washing your hair, massaging you, and even listen to you talk about your problems feels good.  These are all qualities I'd desire (require) in a life partner :-)

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17 hours ago, Troy said:

Sure this is not only a Black woman's problem.

 

ok one more... and that's it!

 

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Notice the bald stylist did not have one of these wigs on. This must have been the tyoe of thing Steve Harvey wore before he wised up.

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On 5/5/2019 at 10:59 AM, Troy said:

Notice the bald stylist did not have one of these wigs on. This must have been the tyoe of thing Steve Harvey wore before he wised up.

 

That is so interesting in that the barber that was applying the wig was bald, but still, it doesn't matter. If people feel good for adding hair enhancements, then it is okay.

I've done some deeper research on 'balding' and feel that today, society does not view this blessing in the proper way, and therefore, some men develop some kind of insecurity.

 

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