Jump to content

All Activity

This stream auto-updates

  1. Yesterday
  2. It's not easy to challenge racism or work for positive social change. Most of us are just trying to live and work regular lives. Being an activist or running for elected office is an impossible task for most people. Maybe black people are no different from anyone else in this regard. At the same time when you look at the black community blaming all the problems solely on racism or economic injustice doesn't make sense. Black people mess up like anyone else. We succeed or fail based on individualism as much as fighting against racism. There are things we must do as people beyond struggle. These things are moral and spiritual. Other issues can be addressed by black community groups and businesses. However this country has been and remains systemically racist. Furthermore working people live and labor in an unjust economy that mainly benefits wealthy elites and corporations. These things undermine black people regardless of other problems. Self help is no substitute for protest or politics. Drugs, gun violence, fatherlessness, academic underachievement, and the decline of marriage undermine black life and community. All of these things are tied together, and they make it harder for us to access opportunity when it is available. Black people have always been deprived of rights and material benefits relative to whites in this society, but we didn't live like this. Crime despite racial stereotypes racist law enforcement didn't plague our neighborhoods. Two parent and strong extended family relationships provided love, discipline, and shelter amid poverty and crippling discrimination. We had each other if we had nothing else. Doing well in school and advancing to college was something everyone took pride in. Our schools were inadequate, but we made the most of things. The irony is not lost on black people that when so many things seemed to get better because of the Civil Rights Movement and a decline in blatant racism black community life declined. We lost the family. We started killing each other over drugs and turf. Oftentimes the violence doesn't have a reason. Too many of us don't succeed in school and it's not the education system - it's us. Contrary to widespread belief among whites blacks spend a lot of time talking about these problems rather than racism. There's nothing wrong with self criticism. Furthermore, we need to all be better people as parents, husbands, wives, lovers, students, and neighbors. Everything is not about racism or capitalist oppression. At the same time community self help and entrepreneurship are important too. Black people have always done things to help themselves and start businesses. We have banded together despite have meager resources to solve problems and meet needs. While our efforts in this regard may not be covered by the mainstream press, black groups and civil society are doing everything possible to tackle problems faced by urban communities. The same thing is happening with black business. There are more black owned companies than ever. Black athletes and entertainers are not just playing sports, singing, or rapping. They are starting all kinds of companies and engaging in lots of business ventures. While most black businesses are small and have few full time employees others are large million and even billion dollar enterprises. We need to keep doing more self help and entrepreneurship on a bigger and more sophisticated level. No matter how bad things are they would be worse if black people themselves had not assumed individual and collective responsibility. Black people past or present have never waited on the government to help us. We need call out white people and certain blacks who say otherwise. Self help and economic development are no substitute for protest or political engagement. We need to be in the streets and on social media fighting racism and economic injustice. We must demand changes that advance freedom and equality. From the nineteenth century abolitionist movement, to Civil Rights protests, the Black Power Revolution, and now the Black Lives Matter struggle against racist policing nothing has never changed for our good or this country's unless black people fought. Racism and discrimination never went away. They became more subtle and are persistent. Black people are not impoverished, underemployed, less wealthy, and underpaid compared to similar whites because of choices we make. Systemic racism is the problem. This impacts black politics. We must hold elected officials including blacks accountable for getting results. Also Black policy wonks and experts who research solutions to problems are more important than ever. Black activists and elected officials need to make sure these people are included at the highest levels of policy making. We need to stop listening to right leaning white people and blacks who say we have no right to demand anything from society or the democratic process. These blacks say "begging the white man" is undignified and useless. For them the solutions are self made. They emphasize cultural pride and awareness especially Black Nationalists focused on the African past. Others talk about restoring the two parent patriarchal family and starting businesses. Black conservatives claim government programs and protest politics have ruined black families, community life, and moral fiber. The call for moral rehabilitation and making our way in society built on less government. Whether it's Black Nationalist or Conservative both approaches discourage activist struggle and political engagement. If we follow their lead we will lose the gains we've made. Our progress and wellbeing depend on self help along with protest and political engagement. We're not perfect people and neither is this country. When it comes to solving problems the choice is not either or. It is both. Right now there are people who want blacks to stop pushing. They are determined to hold on to what they have. Some are racist others are driven by greed and a lust for power. Black people have experienced so many political defeats and policy failures. For many self help works. It is something black people can control without whites. For other blacks making the best of things means being a better person and playing by existing rules. To them changing society is not possible or desirable. However history has shown no matter how good or accommodating black people are racism and economic inequality will deprive us of life, liberty, and happiness until we take a stand. No matter what happens blacks are better off because of politics and activist struggle rather than doing nothing at all.
  3. Black Representation & Self Interpretation: Owning and Controlling Our Images and Spaces. Join The Conversation TODAY 1:30 p.m. Eastern: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83056672690?pwd=Q2t6U2R2NGx1SW4yUk1tajJzRVFtUT09 Meeting ID: 830 5667 2690 Passcode: 1LKDDX #bookfair #books #readingblack
  4. This video is sad and resonates because in 1978 or '79n I experienced something very similar in Queens. Me and my girlfriend, at the time, were walking, not too far from her neighborhood, just like these kids were doing on their bicycles. It is something we did as kids. We were not surrounded by a mob by white kids started throwing rocks and us and made it clear we were not welcomed and would not be allowed to walk on their streets. When you get a mob involved things can really escalate quickly. If the camera's were not around things could have been much worse for these kids. If they were living in home in Queens during this time, I'm sure they were good middle class kids -- of a much higher social standing and rearing the white people who where hurling racial epithets, rocks, and blows. Those white racist ids would become the cops, teachers, nurses who would work in Black neighborhoods....
  5. Last week
  6. 10 Inspirational Lessons for Finding Success in School, Sports and Life Despite Trials and Challenges, Young Jamaican Immigrant Perseveres and Finds Success at MIT, on the Tennis Court and in Mentoring Others Secrets from MIT, Tennis and the Umpire Above 10 Lessons From A Poor Jamaican Boy Who Never Gave Up On The Court by Tarick T. Walton Tarick Walton’s unique and inspirational immigration story, details a life journey from poor, yet ambitious tennis player in Jamaica to MIT scholar to mentor and charismatic leader. The book also includes 10 cross-cultural and applicable “secret life lessons” that will help readers achieve their dreams, regardless of position in life, workplace, classroom, sports arena, or family. Each lesson that Tarick learned occurred during his journey to and while at MIT or through tennis. All lessons are conveyed within their own stand-alone chapters, and each secret lesson is written in the form of a short story so that the reader can freely choose which lesson applies to their specific position in life. Each short story also includes elements of Jamaican music and art so that readers can get an authentic glimpse of Jamaica’s culture. ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Tarick Walton grew up in Spanish Town, Jamaica. A bright student with dreams of accomplishing big things, for himself and others. After being told he would never get into a prestigious American college, he was determined to prove that he could. Amidst life-altering setbacks, he persevered to successfully graduate from MIT with a degree in Civil and Environmental Engineering. Tarick began playing tennis at a young age, approaching the game of tennis with the same joy, perseverance and determination as he did his studies. From school to sports, every step of Tarick’s life has been filled with challenges and obstacles, however, his joyful tenacity and persistence have allowed him to become not only successful in business but also a mentor to young people who are dedicated to following their dreams. After MIT, Tarick received an MBA from Georgetown University, and with a diverse group of friends, he later co-founded The Walton & Friends Foundation, a 501c3 non-profit organization that brings together leaders of all industries (Business, Art, Science, Non-Profit and Community) to promote STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts & Math) education among youth and engage in corporate social partnership projects that solve real life problems. Whether in work or mentoring youth, Tarick lives by and encourages others with his motto, “Do not let the world dampen your dreams.“ He currently lives in the United States with his wife, son and one on the way. TALKING POINTS: Inspiring youth and immigrants: advice for young readers/immigrants who have a dream 4 tips for managing emotions on and off the court How sports can parallel life: 3 tips for fall sports 3 steps for goal setting: getting back into the classroom after 1.5 years Many of today’s young people prioritize social engagements that are rooted in narcissistic and self-absorbed values instead of eternal principles that have guided great inventors, leaders, artists, activists, and athletes in the past. How can we steer them in the right direction? Are we forgetting to teach young people how to critically think and solve problems? Tips for rediscovering the importance of a God behind the balance of life, similar to the umpire in tennis BOOK SPECS: Pub date: September 30, 2021 Publisher: Page Publishing ISBN: 978-1-6624-2097-9 Format: Paperback Price: $24.95 Page Count: 195 Contact: Leslie Barrett, PR by the Book leslie@prbythebook.com
  7. Ilati Submission.png

    My Ilati DTIYS submission- if you are on deviantart give it a like:) 
    https://www.deviantart.com/hddeviant/art/Ilati-Submission-887229522?ga_submit_new=10%3A1627611971

     


    The calligraphed text is from the complete poem below

    A lioness is not a wife to a lion
    She is an unbound oman who choose a man to create and raise kin side
    Ilati is wild
    Shamhat was not a wife to Enkidu
    She cried to the future life, he cried while a living patricide
    Ilati is wild

     

    Title: Root to Ilati

    A lioness is not a wife to a lion
    She is an unbound woman who choose a man to create and raise kin side
    Ilati is wild
    Her forebear Enkidu cried
    Enkidu at Death door
    Enkidu cursed immortal desire
    Enkidu lamented knowing he will die
    Her forebear Shamhat cried
    Shamhat while being a door
    Shamhat danced immortal desire
    Shamhat convinced Enkidu to know he will die
    Shamhat was not a wife to Enkidu
    She cried to the future life, he cried while a living patricide
    Ilati is wild

     

    IF you like my poetry check out the following poetry collections
    Textbook
    https://www.kobo.com/ebook/poetry-or-more-1
    Audiobook
    https://www.kobo.com/audiobook/poetry-or-more-2015-2016

     

    The invitational is no longer accepting submission but please see all submissions in the comments
    https://www.deviantart.com/stumpyfongo/journal/ILATI-DTIYS-CHALLENGE-885149258
     

  8. CREATIVE TABLE 2 Namina Forna , The ExtraChallenged , Kugali comics , Wildbow wisdom , Bethany Morrow history through historical fiction , Harlem Nights and Black Artistic Patronage , Eugene Bacon speculative future , Morrison on HAmilton , Tochi Onyebuchi on Juneteenth side freedom , what it means to be a writer , Sylessae- draw in your own style , Bill Cosby , Superman will be black, Alligado , The Black SCreenriter cometh, 100 years of communist china , JAmes Baldwin advice on writing, Animal BFF, Character Copyright , Swing from Oscar Micheaux , Humanity vs I am Legend , Negotiating , Artist be like, Spiderman head tutorial , audiobook narration styles future, going from text to voice , sars-cov-2 truths , Summer Of Soul- some thoughts, Simone Biles vs Dylan Roof a comparison to mental health reactions, ? In the first creative table, I used the comment section of the post to hold the content. This was dysfunctional. Took me years to figure it out:) This creative table, I will use my profile activity list to hold the data and tabulate it in this post. If you want to see the first creative table, utilize the following link after the makeshift arrow -> LINK
  9. Dylan Roof- church shooter VS  Simone Biles- olympian legend.jpg
    Dylan Roof , I remember him, a person who murdered innocent people. His mental health was stated in media as warranting attention and was not rejected for being misplaced. 
    Simone Biles is an Olympian Living Legend, and her mental health struggles are being mocked. 
    Very interesting parallel
    https://twitter.com/BlackAlphaNetw1/status/1420126314183512064?s=09

  10. now0.png

     

    My intial reply to the video

    nina simone was a polymath... the problem with black people when we gather in public is, for events meant for music or community, march on washington/summer of jazz/ jazzmobile/million man march/black film festival.. black people don't produce violence. But, we do produce violence when the tipping points are reached. ... I disagree with both of you. I don't think the lack of media outlets wanting to display the Summer of Soul is a shame. Ownership matters folks. You both mentioned how Gil Scott Heron or the Last Poets were not on the bill. But that was and is part of the problem. White people own media outlets that allow all spectrums of the white community to speak. Name me one Black owned media outlet that serves five unique black segments in the black community? Yes, my parents remember that concert. To be blunt, Harlem has a long history of similar events. That famous photo at Duke Ellington's house is not a joke. Harlem between the 1920s -1970s had the greatest collection of black entertainers for a region in any city in the usa. The recording of the concert was a surprise for my parents. ... Don, no one is a complete encyclopedia:)

     

    Someone somewhere in the internet stated the Black community ended the great era of Black Music in the 1970s, I oppose that position. The following is my reply

    We didn't end it. All musical eras end. To be blunt, the black community in usa had many great musical times after the war between the states. The st louis/to harlem slide jazz era. The big band era. The R&B initial era. Motown. Many great black songwriters in each of those eras. We didn't end , we changed. Black people in the usa's music changes as we change. The reason why we made the blues is cause right after the war between the states, many of us had a sadness, a blue mood. When we started growing more financially positive, actually getting whites to allow us to own businesses or get paid to do ork while still being nonviolent <not saying all black people wanted that but I comgress>, we turned the blues into rhythm and blues. After world war II when the black community oddly enough had large financial growth for individuals, we created rock and roll from R&B which is from the Blues. We created Funk as a blues version of the motown sound. Where motown was manicured black music for the white audience, in the same vein as scott joplin's minstrel music, which he did alongside his ragtime works. Ragtime was in my view, a piano version of jazz, which was started with horned instruments in new orleans.  Jazz progressed from the northern expansion. Starting from the storyville's of new orleans to St Louis, to Chicago to HArlem, to every bar from Shanghai to Berlin to Rio de janeiro to calcutta to Cairo all around the earth, jazz was played at one time, a rare achievement for one art form. So much so that colleges throughout humanity teach jazz. Many surviving jazz musicians were able to financially survive being the first jazz teachers in schools where only white jazz teachers may exist today.  No, black music changes as black people change. House Music comes from the urban black community, which in the vein of funk fuses all the many prior musical forms from Blues or Jazz. But with a larger technological capability than Funk, which began using tech in unique ways for music. We didn't end it. Today you can hear way too many excellent black blues musicians under 50, black jazz musicians under 50. White owned media companies dominate the industry and they prefer pop music, which is hat Motown or the Ragtime was. All three are intended to appeal to mass audiences, be good to sell. All three evaded or try to evade cultural friction. So, all is good, the black musical heritage lives in the black community for me, and continuous to grow or change, becoming more global, having more linguistical width than in the past, more cultural variance. All is good. 


    Movies That Move We video Review

     

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6L1bNVo8gYU
     

     

  11. When released, I also will buy a copy. I ordered the download. I recently released a book of poetry. One poem from the book. Pandemic Poem - Pandemic And in the end of days, the people were all stricken by Fear From a virus named after a Beer There was no toilet paper to be found of any Brand Something I personally didn’t Understand I thought to buy so much you would have to be a Nut Apparently no one wanted to die with a dirty Butt The villagers and their children were told to stay Home Some quarantined and not allowed to Roam A lot of churches had no faith and closed up Fast You know it’s a pandemic when they won’t take your Cash I ask you, is life so precious that we dare question the LORD? To discount His powers is a price we can’t Afford As with other pandemics that didn’t Last Trust in GOD and this also will come to Pass....... website: www.id-books.org. E-book and Paperback Available.
  12. Praying for Book Review by AALBC. - My name is Ira Davis. I am the author of the book "War Between Good and Evil". ISBN is 978-1-953090-23-2. Publication Date 06/08/2021. Synopsis: War Between Good and Evil: A collection of Poems, Vol. I., is a completed 12,342-word poetry book that mostly describes life in America through the lens of a Black man. The poems describe the challenges of growing up in poverty with an absent father and a mother who will move mountains to hold her family together. The speaker describes his struggles and the challenges of making ends meet and how he eventually overcomes those struggles and achieves his aspirations. The poems are of conflict and triumph. Poems like “Our Mama – Ruth Catherine Lee-Davis” pay tribute to a loving mother who spends her life putting her family first. Of his mother’s tenacity, the speaker writes, “It’s time for you now to take a Ride, / For your price lies on the other Side” (Davis. 2-3). In “Brandon’s Poem,” the speaker remembers a dear friend lost along the way. “To My Young Brothers” warns a younger generation of men and women of mistakes and choices that can make or break an individual. “Being Black In America” is a rhythmic plea for a more inclusive America that is yet to embrace all her children, with lines like “Police don’t have to have a reason / Because killing our Blacks is always in season” (Davis. 12-13). And although War Between Good and Evil is a one-man’s journey through life, readers will find the book relatable. http://www.id-books.org
  13. Praying for Book Review by AALBC. - My name is Ira Davis. I am the author of the book "War Between Good and Evil". ISBN is 978-1-953090-23-2. Publication Date 06/08/2021. Synopsis: War Between Good and Evil: A collection of Poems, Vol. I., is a completed 12,342-word poetry book that mostly describes life in America through the lens of a Black man. The poems describe the challenges of growing up in poverty with an absent father and a mother who will move mountains to hold her family together. The speaker describes his struggles and the challenges of making ends meet and how he eventually overcomes those struggles and achieves his aspirations. The poems are of conflict and triumph. Poems like “Our Mama – Ruth Catherine Lee-Davis” pay tribute to a loving mother who spends her life putting her family first. Of his mother’s tenacity, the speaker writes, “It’s time for you now to take a Ride, / For your price lies on the other Side” (Davis. 2-3). In “Brandon’s Poem,” the speaker remembers a dear friend lost along the way. “To My Young Brothers” warns a younger generation of men and women of mistakes and choices that can make or break an individual. “Being Black In America” is a rhythmic plea for a more inclusive America that is yet to embrace all her children, with lines like “Police don’t have to have a reason / Because killing our Blacks is always in season” (Davis. 12-13). And although War Between Good and Evil is a one-man’s journey through life, readers will find the book relatable. http://www.id-books.org
  14. 10 Inspirational Lessons for Finding Success in School, Sports and Life Despite Trials and Challenges, Young Jamaican Immigrant Perseveres and Finds Success at MIT, on the Tennis Court and in Mentoring Others Secrets from MIT, Tennis and the Umpire Above 10 Lessons From A Poor Jamaican Boy Who Never Gave Up On The Court by Tarick T. Walton Tarick Walton’s unique and inspirational immigration story, details a life journey from poor, yet ambitious tennis player in Jamaica to MIT scholar to mentor and charismatic leader. The book also includes 10 cross-cultural and applicable “secret life lessons” that will help readers achieve their dreams, regardless of position in life, workplace, classroom, sports arena, or family. Each lesson that Tarick learned occurred during his journey to and while at MIT or through tennis. All lessons are conveyed within their own stand-alone chapters, and each secret lesson is written in the form of a short story so that the reader can freely choose which lesson applies to their specific position in life. Each short story also includes elements of Jamaican music and art so that readers can get an authentic glimpse of Jamaica’s culture. ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Tarick Walton grew up in Spanish Town, Jamaica. A bright student with dreams of accomplishing big things, for himself and others. After being told he would never get into a prestigious American college, he was determined to prove that he could. Amidst life-altering setbacks, he persevered to successfully graduate from MIT with a degree in Civil and Environmental Engineering. Tarick began playing tennis at a young age, approaching the game of tennis with the same joy, perseverance and determination as he did his studies. From school to sports, every step of Tarick’s life has been filled with challenges and obstacles, however, his joyful tenacity and persistence have allowed him to become not only successful in business but also a mentor to young people who are dedicated to following their dreams. After MIT, Tarick received an MBA from Georgetown University, and with a diverse group of friends, he later co-founded The Walton & Friends Foundation, a 501c3 non-profit organization that brings together leaders of all industries (Business, Art, Science, Non-Profit and Community) to promote STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts & Math) education among youth and engage in corporate social partnership projects that solve real life problems. Whether in work or mentoring youth, Tarick lives by and encourages others with his motto, “Do not let the world dampen your dreams.“ He currently lives in the United States with his wife, son and one on the way. TALKING POINTS: Inspiring youth and immigrants: advice for young readers/immigrants who have a dream 4 tips for managing emotions on and off the court How sports can parallel life: 3 tips for fall sports 3 steps for goal setting: getting back into the classroom after 1.5 years Many of today’s young people prioritize social engagements that are rooted in narcissistic and self-absorbed values instead of eternal principles that have guided great inventors, leaders, artists, activists, and athletes in the past. How can we steer them in the right direction? Are we forgetting to teach young people how to critically think and solve problems? Tips for rediscovering the importance of a God behind the balance of life, similar to the umpire in tennis BOOK SPECS: Pub date: September 30, 2021 Publisher: Page Publishing ISBN: 978-1-6624-2097-9 Format: Paperback Price: $24.95 Page Count: 195 Contact: Leslie Barrett, leslie@prbythebook.com
  15. sounds like an interesting read. good luck with your circulation and sales
  16. The print version won’t be out for over a year because it will be a compilation hard cover.
  17. It probably would be a good thing, but I'm an optimist.
  18. Dude, I can't even afford to live in NYC let alone run a brick and mortar store there. But I guess if it is going to happen one has to dream big. Thanks! I'll peep Tariq's game.
  19. Troy You titled this thread Are The Aliens Coming For Us? My question for you is: If they were....would that necessarily be a BAD thing? If these Aliens have superior technology then they probably can help us with health problems, extend our longevity, etc. Maybe even help us when it comes to spiritual matters.
  20. Troy I've been all over the country visiting stores like Janice's. I wish the economics, in places like Harlem, permitted stores like Boarding House Books to exist. You can make that happen. You may have to have a few fundraising events if you have the time and energy, but you CAN make it happen. Tariq Nasheed is trying to build some sort of Black history museum in Los Angeles right now and he's raising money to do so. You should check out what he's doing as a bit of an outline/blue print of some things you can do.
  21. I finished watching the documentary linked below concerning Buddy Guy and while I didn't learn anything I didn't know about the music industry, I did learn about some personal information on Buddy Guy's life i did not know. I think those unfamiliar with the Blues will get to see many faces they never saw or names they never heard or hear some music as well. But, the following prose is based on a comparison I heard between the stated documentary side one about daft punk I saw. 
    In both documentaries, a truth was presented. When Daft Punk won the best grammy award, they said, people in the usa are shocked by the music they play but the music they play was started in the usa, in the black community. 
    In the buddy guy documentary, buddy guy admits, it was the rolling stones + eric clapton side other british acts, simple admittance that they learned from listening to black blues musicians from the usa, that changed his career. 
    House Music side the Blues were both initiated by the Black community, a race based on a phenotypical range of skin not geographic forbearance for those who do not know , in the USA.   The two styles have a century or more distance between their starting points. By these two films, people in the music industry are admitting that the white < phenotypical range not geographic forbearance> community in the usa for over a century, covering the entirety of the commonly named 1900s, existed side a black community they knew and know nothing about. 
    Why did I mention this? In the USA many people are always talking about the unity of the statian <from the usa , a term to my knowledge first used by mark twain, a white man> community. I read so many articles where people are suggesting the USA has a unity that is breaking. But, is that true? 
    Music isn't a blade or a bomb or an elected position or a revenue earning firm. Music is always an easily spreadable thing in human culture. Maybe the problem in the USA today is a myth of unity or good neighborship exists in the usa, that is not true... 
    What say you? 

    PBS site- A song 
    The Blues Chase The Blues Away from Buddy Guy is free to listen to
    https://www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/stream-buddy-guy-blues-chase-blues-away-documentary/17954/

    now0.png

     

  22. It currently is only in Digital Format. For direct download access https://www.paypal.com/instantcommerce/checkout/ML999L4TEKUAJ
  23. One of the things I like to do when I visit a new city is to check out the indie bookstores. It is almost always a pleasurable experience -- especially when the owner is happy to talk shop. Such was the case at Boarding House Books in Claremore, OK Claremore, OK is a really small town in North Eastern, OK. I have lived in an apartment complex with more apartments than there are people who live in all of Claremore. Its most famous residents include Patti Page and Will Rogers. Claremore, like the rest of state, is Trump Country. I actually went to Claremore for a completely unrelated reason and stumbled across the store strolling down their "main street," something I also like to do when visiting small communities. I just like the idea of a neighborhood that has a strip of indie stores run by local people. The streets are often named Main Street and are very quaint -- I like them. NYC's 125th street was the closest thing we had in Harlem to a "Main Street," but now it is over run with multination chains that have robbed the community of its character. At any rate, I was surprised to come upon what appeared to be a modest store front bookstore. I was looking for the book Leviathan Wakes by James S. A. Corey and was told to go to room #8 upstairs. I was surprised the store had a 2nd floor that was twice the foot print of the first floor. The store was actually larger than any bookstore I've seen in Harlem (back when Harlem actually had indie bookstores). We quickly found the book I was looking for and spent the next hour pouring over the volumes. I had an arm full of books, both new and used. I would have purchased many more books, but I was starting to get carried away The owner, a woman about my age, told me she had over 40K books in her store. She knew exactly how many books she had because she had them all in an database. I was impressed, so she showed me the software she used. She also gave us a tour of the store and explained its history. The owner, Janice Whitaker (pictured with me below), also told me she was had a degree in Electrical Engineering and an MBA. I was like, "So do I! How in the world did we end up becoming booksellers" She is also a passionate cyclist (as am I) and I said we need to take a photo together. I've been all over the country visiting stores like Janice's. I wish the economics, in places like Harlem, permitted stores like Boarding House Books to exist.
  1. Load more activity
×
×
  • Create New...