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Pioneer1

Legal Protection For AfroAmericans?

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Kareem, you mentioning your profession made me think about how vulnerable so many AfroAmericans are when it comes to legal protection in this system.

Many of the Caucasians I know casually toss around the threat of suing people for this reason or that and often times they do. Sometimes they win, sometimes they lose, but most of the times it's settled out of court with atleast some benefit for them.
But just that threat or ability to sue and having a lawyer (often times a family member or friend) argue for them was enough to get them SOMETHING.
Meanwhile I know AfroAmericans who have had CRAZY shit happen to them on jobs, by the police, at the hospital....didn't have the money and didn't have lawyer friends, much of the time they were just S.O.L.

And while they may help their Caucasian friends sue over the sillies things, many Caucasian lawyers will refuse a case by an AfroAmerican unless they feel it could be open-shut and rake in big bucks.
If not.....they don't want to even waste their time.

How can we remedy this situation?

I often daydream about what would happen in this society if AfroAmericans were confident that they could sue and WIN over any injustices and mistreatments they encounter whether it's at work, on the street, or when it comes to family situations.

I'm sure people would think twice about calling the cops on a brother walking through a park if they figured not only would he sue any police officers involved in detaining him, but also sue whoever called the cops in the first place, AND sue the dispatcher for entertaining such a frivolous call.....causing ALL of them to either lose their jobs and/or pay some money!

What if you could sue the local police department for neglect because gangs exist in your community....and actually WIN the lawsuit?

What if every AfroAmerican parent who had a fat child were able to sue McDonalds for contributing to a medical condition and WIN?


Man, imagine if AfroAmericans had the type of legal power that if your cousin was shot and killed over a dice game in the hood, YOU could still sue the manufacturer of the gun and/or bullets used in his murder and WIN!

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Now this story I just saw on CNN is a great example of what I'm talking about.
It displays "White priviledge" and the confidence that comes with knowing you have legal power on your side.


https://www.cnn.com/2019/09/11/us/high-school-swimsuit-disqualified-alaska-trnd/index.html


Here you have a Caucasian girl who basically wants to show off her ass and because she's being told not to her and her mother want to fight other Caucasians at her school who themselves want to govern people and tell them how to dress and what to wear!

2 groups of Caucasians, both with DOMINATING minds who don't want to be ruled over or controled by the other!

But CNN will cover it and give this girl and her silly ass complaint some attention!

You have lawyers and legal teams willing to jump in and take sides and argue for weeks and probably months over this crazy crap and she may even end up getting money for "sexual harassment" from her school!


Now what if AfroAmericans had that type of power in this society?

What if we had the power to sue the teacher if our child got a bad grade and convince the judge or jury that it was the teachers fault?

What if a sister just wanted to walk down the street butt naked and if she got stopped by the police she'd turn around and sue and WIN because they denied her the freedom of expression?

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16 hours ago, Pioneer1 said:

Many of the Caucasians I know casually toss around the threat of suing people for this reason or that and often times they do. Sometimes they win, sometimes they lose, but most of the times it's settled out of court with atleast some benefit for them.

 

I don't want to advertise on Troy's site like this, so I'll be vague. We started the black version of LegalZoom back in 2016. Since I'm not a lawyer and neither is my mentor/uncle who started it, we CAREFULLY crafted the disclaimer on the site to ensure we're not "practicing law without a license." We help people represent themselves in civil and criminal cases, which is your right pursuant to the Sixth Amendment and affirmed by Faretta v. California, 422 U.S. 806 (1975).

 

We write research and write all the briefs, and write out simple instructions as to advancing your case through the system. Like you said, some settle very quickly when the Defendants see a well-argued, pro-se petition or complaint. We wanted it to help black folks. But truth be told, most of our clients are white who have enough money to afford a paralegal, but not a lawyer. I mean, we're not going to turn down the business. And there have definitely been some "wild" lawsuits we've helped them file. Their family court stuff is even crazier. But we have/had some interesting cases with black Plaintiffs too.

 

16 hours ago, Pioneer1 said:

Man, imagine if AfroAmericans had the type of legal power that if your cousin was shot and killed over a dice game in the hood, YOU could still sue the manufacturer of the gun and/or bullets used in his murder and WIN!

 

We had a case very similar to this last year. Of course the details have to be confidential. But even I was surprised that a MAJOR company with a carefully-crafted terms of service paid off one of our clients just to go away. We charged them a flat rate to research and prepare their briefs, then take a small percentage of any settlement. Everyone was happy in the end. Essentially, if black folks want a shot at justice, we have to do it ourselves. That's what our little company tries to do. I mean, we've had to turn down potential black clients because they want everything free, which is unrealistic. They don't understand that we costs about 80% less than what they'd pay a lawyer. But that they have to put forth a lot of effort as well to prosecute their own cases with our help. Once we had a few white clients, they spread us via word-of-mouth. Now that little company and its revenue basically keeps all our blogs alive.

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9 hours ago, Kareem said:

 

I don't want to advertise on Troy's site like this, so I'll be vague.

 

I have no problem with you mentioning your business. 1/3 of the post here are people promoting their books and nothing else.   

 

 

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19 hours ago, Troy said:

 

I have no problem with you mentioning your business. 1/3 of the post here are people promoting their books and nothing else.   

 

 

 

Thank you, Troy. But this is still not the forum for linking legal assistance.

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