Carter G. Woodson Award Winning Books


As of 2001 awards and honors are given in the following categories, Elementary (K-6), Middle (5-8), and Secondary (7-12) grade level books.

Carter Woodson Award Seal Carter G. Woodson Seal

The National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) established the Carter G. Woodson Book Awards for the most distinguished books appropriate for young readers that depict ethnicity in the United States. First presented in 1974, this award is intended to “encourage the writing, publishing, and dissemination of outstanding social studies books for young readers that treat topics related to ethnic minorities and race relations sensitively and accurately.” Books relating to ethnic minorities and the authors of such books rarely receive the recognition they merit from professional organizations. By sponsoring the Carter G. Woodson Awards, NCSS gives wide recognition to and encourages these authors and publishers. Here is a printable list of all the award winning books. Learn more at NCSS’s website.

Also check out our list of Top 100+ Recommended African-American Children’s Books, some are also CSK Award winning titles.


4 Award Winning and Honored Books for 1996


Elementary Award

Songs from the Loom: A Navajo Girl Learns to Weave (We Are Still Here)
by Monty Roessel

    Publication Date:
    List Price: $8.95
    Format: Paperback, 48 pages
    Classification: Nonfiction
    Target Age Group: Picture Book
    ISBN13: 9780822597124
    Imprint: Lerner Publishing Group
    Publisher: Lerner Publishing Group
    Parent Company: Lerner Publishing Group
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    Book Description: 
    In this unique series, Native American authors examine their cultural traditions, from Navajo rug weaving in the Southwest to wild rice gathering in northern Minnesota. Each book describes these customs as they are seen through the eyes of the participants and discusses how Native American people maintain their cultural identities in contemporary society.

    Outstanding Merit

    Konnichiwa! I Am a Japanese-American Girl
    by Tricia Brown

      Publication Date:
      List Price: $15.95
      Format: Hardcover
      Classification: Nonfiction
      Target Age Group: Early Reader
      ISBN13: 9780805023534
      Imprint: Henry Holt & Company (BYR)
      Publisher: Macmillan
      Parent Company: Verlagsgruppe Georg von Holtzbrinck
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      Book Description: 
      Presents the activities of Lauren Kamiya and her family as they prepare for and participate in the Cherry Blossom Festival in San Francisco, an event that combines elements of both Japanese and American cultures. By the author of Chinese New Year.

      Outstanding Merit

      Red-Tail Angels: The Story Of The Tuskegee Airmen Of World War Ii
      by Patricia C. McKissack and Fredrick McKissack

        Publication Date:
        List Price: $21.95
        Format: Hardcover, 144 pages
        Classification: Nonfiction
        Target Age Group: Middle Grade
        ISBN13: 9780802782922
        Imprint: Walker Childrens
        Publisher: Walker and Co
        Parent Company: Walker and Co
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        Book Description: 
        A history of African American pilots with a focus on World War II.

        Secondary Level Winner

        A Fence Away From Freedom
        by Ellen S. Levine

          Publication Date:
          List Price: $18.99
          Format: Hardcover, 260 pages
          Classification: Nonfiction
          Target Age Group: Middle Grade
          ISBN13: 9780399226380
          Imprint: Putnam Juvenile
          Publisher: Penguin Random House
          Parent Company: Bertelsmann
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          Book Description: 
          A series of interviews with Japanese Americans, who were placed in internment camps during World War II merely because they had Japanese ancestry, reveals how they lost businesses, homes, and personal possessions.