3 Books Published by Kent State University Press on Our Site — Book Cover Mosaic

Click for more detail about Growing Season: The Life of a Migrant Community by David Hassler Growing Season: The Life of a Migrant Community

by David Hassler
Kent State University Press (Nov 15, 2006)
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When photographer Gary Harwood first stepped onto the K. W. Zellers family farm in Hartville, Ohio, to take pictures of the Mexican migrant workers there, he did not expect to find such a strong, tightly knit community. Over the next five years, he used his camera to study the lives and work of these migrants in their northeastern Ohio home. His artful photography captures the migrants’ portraits and movingly conveys their great pride in work and family, their struggles and joys. Accompanying these vibrant photographs are revealing first-person narratives written by David Hassler. The voices of the migrants and community members are eloquent testaments to the importance of the culture, the resilience of the people, and the power of the place. In photos and stories, Growing Season celebrates the work and play and religious, medical, familial, and communal experiences of these workers - young, old, male, female - and offers readers a success story.


Click for more detail about The Genuine Negro Hero (Wick Poetry Chapbooks Series Ii) by Thomas Sayers Ellis The Genuine Negro Hero (Wick Poetry Chapbooks Series Ii)

by Thomas Sayers Ellis
Kent State University Press (Apr 03, 2001)
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This work contains poetry by Thomas Sayers Ellis, described by critics as "emotionally complex".


Click for more detail about The Gospel of Barbecue by Honorée Fanonne Jeffers The Gospel of Barbecue

by Honorée Fanonne Jeffers
Kent State University Press (Oct 06, 2000)
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“Honoree Jeffers is an exciting and original new poet, and the Gospel of Barbecue is her aptly titled debut work. These poems are sweet and sassy, hot and biting, flavored in an exciting blend of precise language and sharp and surprising imagery that delights. They leave a taste in your mouth, these poems; they are true to themselves and to the world. They are gospel, indeed, and this young poet will be heard more and more spreading the true word. Good news.” —Lucille Clifton