16 Books Published by Cambridge University Press on Our Site — Book Cover Mosaic

Click for more detail about Birthright Citizens: A History of Race and Rights in Antebellum America by Martha S. Jones Birthright Citizens: A History of Race and Rights in Antebellum America

by Martha S. Jones
Cambridge University Press (Jun 28, 2018)
Read Detailed Book Description


Birthright Citizens tells how African American activists radically transformed the terms of citizenship for all Americans. Before the Civil War, colonization schemes and black laws threatened to deport former slaves born in the United States. Birthright Citizens recovers the story of how African American activists remade national belonging through battles in legislatures, conventions, and courthouses. They faced formidable opposition, most notoriously from the US Supreme Court decision in Dred Scott. Still, Martha S. Jones explains, no single case defined their status. Former slaves studied law, secured allies, and conducted themselves like citizens, establishing their status through local, everyday claims. All along they argued that birth guaranteed their rights. With fresh archival sources and an ambitious reframing of constitutional law-making before the Civil War, Jones shows how when the Fourteenth Amendment constitutionalized the birthright principle, the aspirations of black Americans’ aspirations were realized.


Click for more detail about A History of the African American Novel by Valerie Babb A History of the African American Novel

by Valerie Babb
Cambridge University Press (Jul 31, 2017)
Read Detailed Book Description

African American novels have moved from being a literature of necessity to being a literature. Perhaps it is time for them once again to return to their origins, however, and have their themes applied to broader contexts. Perhaps they should once again become a literature of necessity because their arguments for the humanity of black Americans are needed to advocate for the respect of all human life; their arguments for equal treatment under the law are needed as reminders of the social justice work that still must be done. The visions of community within so many of them as well as their cautions of dangers to community, offer models for reordering social structures to benefit larger humanity. By making coherence out of the chaotic experiences of enslavement, racism, and the many resulting disjuncture’s African American novels provide multiple examples for navigating the complex arrays of human experience.

A History of the African American Novel offers an in-depth overview of the development of the novel and its major genres. In the first part of this book, Valerie Babb examines the evolution of the novel from the 1850s to the present, showing how the concept of black identity has transformed along with the art form. The second part of this History explores the prominent genres of African American novels, such as neoslave narratives, detective fiction, and speculative fiction, and considers how each one reflects changing understandings of blackness. This book builds on other literary histories by including early black print culture, African American graphic novels, pulp fiction, and the history of adaptation of black novels to film. By placing novels in conversation with other documents - early black newspapers and magazines, film, and authorial correspondence — A History of the African American Novel brings many voices to the table to broaden interpretations of the novel's development.


Click for more detail about The Cambridge History of African American Literature by Jerry W. Ward The Cambridge History of African American Literature

by Jerry W. Ward
Cambridge University Press (Dec 17, 2015)
Read Detailed Book Description


The first major twenty-first century history of four hundred years of black writing, The Cambridge History of African American Literature presents a comprehensive overview of the literary traditions, oral and print, of African-descended peoples in the United States. Expert contributors, drawn from the United States and beyond, emphasize the dual nature of each text discussed as a work of art created by an individual and as a response to unfolding events in American cultural, political, and social history. Unprecedented in scope, sophistication and accessibility, the volume draws together current scholarship in the field. It also looks ahead to suggest new approaches, new areas of study, and as yet undervalued writers and works. The Cambridge History of African American Literature is a major achievement both as a work of reference and as a compelling narrative and will remain essential reading for scholars and students in years to come.


Click for more detail about Bourgeois Radicals: The NAACP and the Struggle for Colonial Liberation, 1941-1960 by Carol Anderson Bourgeois Radicals: The NAACP and the Struggle for Colonial Liberation, 1941-1960

by Carol Anderson
Cambridge University Press (Dec 08, 2014)
Read Detailed Book Description


Bourgeois Radicals explores the NAACP’s key role in the liberation of Africans and Asians across the globe even as it fought Jim Crow on the home front during the long civil rights movement. In the eyes of the NAACP’s leaders, the way to create a stable international system, stave off communism in Africa and Asia, and prevent capitalist exploitation was to embed human rights, with its economic and cultural protections, in the transformation of colonies into nations. Indeed, the NAACP aided in the liberation struggles of multiple African and Asian countries within the limited ideological space of the Second Red Scare. However, its vision of a "third way" to democracy and nationhood for the hundreds of millions in Asia and Africa was only partially realized due to a toxic combination of the Cold War, Jim Crow, and die-hard imperialism. Bourgeois Radicals examines the toll that internationalism took on the organization and illuminates the linkages between the struggle for human rights and the fight for colonial independence.


Click for more detail about A Catalogue of the Egyptian Collection in the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge by E. A. Wallace Budge A Catalogue of the Egyptian Collection in the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge

by E. A. Wallace Budge
Cambridge University Press (Jul 20, 2009)
Read Detailed Book Description


Since the first donations of Egyptian artefacts to the Fitzwilliam Museum, including the sarcophagus lid of Rameses III donated in 1823, its ancient Egyptian holdings have grown steadily. This collection, now one of the most important in Britain, was catalogued for the first time by Sir Ernest Alfred Thompson Wallis Budge (1857-1934) of the British Museum’s department of antiquities. Budge was a leading authority on ancient Egypt and had himself acquired several pieces for the museum in Egypt in 1886-7. The collection as listed in this 1893 publication included 577 objects: sarcophagi, coffins, canopic jars, mummies, scarabs, sculptures, and other decorative objects. Budge provided transcriptions and translations of the hieroglyphs that appear on the objects with his descriptions of each item. Although the collection has been augmented by many further gifts and purchases, Budge’s catalogue remains a valuable record of the collection in the late Victorian period.


Click for more detail about A History of Barbados: From Amerindian Settlement to Caribbean Single Market by Hilary Beckles A History of Barbados: From Amerindian Settlement to Caribbean Single Market

by Hilary Beckles
Cambridge University Press (Mar 26, 2007)
Read Detailed Book Description


Highly acclaimed when it first appeared in 1990, this general history of Barbados traces the events and ideas that have shaped the collaborative experience of all the islands inhabitants. In this second edition, Hilary Beckles updates the text to reflect the considerable number of writings recently published on Barbados. He presents new insights and analyses key events in a lucid and provocative style which will appeal to all those who have an interest in the island’s past and present. Using a vigorous approach, Hilary Beckles examines how the influences of the Amerindians, European colonisation, the sugar industry, the African slave trade, emancipation, the civil rights movement, independence in 1966 and nationalism have shaped contemporary Barbados.


Click for more detail about Freedoms Won: Caribbean Emancipations, Ethnicities and Nationhood by Hilary Beckles Freedoms Won: Caribbean Emancipations, Ethnicities and Nationhood

by Hilary Beckles
Cambridge University Press (Jan 16, 2007)
Read Detailed Book Description


Written by two of the Caribbean’s leading historians, Freedoms Won is an essential book for students engaged in following courses on the history of the Caribbean. It will also be of interest to general readers seeking information on the history of the region. Starting with the aftermath of emancipation, Freedoms Won covers the African-Caribbean peasantry, Asian arrival in the Caribbean, social and political experiences of the working classes in the immediate post-slavery period, the Caribbean economy, US intervention and imperialst tendencies from the 18th century, the Labour Movement in the Caribbean in the 20th centurym the social life and culture of the Caribbean people, and social protest, decolonisation and nationhood.


Click for more detail about The Neoconservative Revolution: Jewish Intellectuals and the Shaping of Public Policy by Murray Friedman The Neoconservative Revolution: Jewish Intellectuals and the Shaping of Public Policy

by Murray Friedman
Cambridge University Press (May 16, 2005)
Read Detailed Book Description


This is the first history of the development of American Jewish political conservatism and the rise of a group of Jewish intellectuals and activists who are known as neoconservatives. It describes the growth of perhaps a dozen such figures in the 1940s and 50s, including Irving Kristol, Nathan Glazer and Norman Podhoretz, to several hundred younger people such as Paul Wolfowitz, David Brooks and Charles Krauthammer who have had a powerful impact on American public policy, including the run up to and aftermath of the war in Iraq.

Book Review

Click for more detail about Black Crescent: The Experience and Legacy of African Muslims in the Americas by Michael A. Gomez Black Crescent: The Experience and Legacy of African Muslims in the Americas

by Michael A. Gomez
Cambridge University Press (Apr 04, 2005)
Read Detailed Book Description


Beginning with Latin America in the fifteenth century, this book comprises a social history of the experiences of African Muslims and their descendants throughout the Americas, including the Caribbean. The years under slavery are examined, as well as the post-slavery period. The study also analyzes Muslim revolts in Brazil—especially in 1835. The second part of the book traces the emergence of Islam among U.S. African descendants in the twentieth century, featuring chapters on Noble Drew Ali, Elijah Muhammad, and Malcolm X to explain how orthodoxy arose from varied unorthodox roots. Currently Professor of History and Middle Eastern Studies at NYU, Michael Gomez has research interests that include Islam in West Africa, the African diaspora and African culture in North America. He has been involved with the launching of a new academic organization, the Association for the Study of the Worldwide African Diaspora (ASWAD), and has published widely in the field.


Click for more detail about Buried by the Times: The Holocaust and America’s Most Important Newspaper by Laurel Leff Buried by the Times: The Holocaust and America’s Most Important Newspaper

by Laurel Leff
Cambridge University Press (Mar 21, 2005)
Read Detailed Book Description


An in-depth look at how The New York Times failed in its coverage of the fate of European Jews from 1939-45. It examines how the decisions that were made at The Times ultimately resulted in the minimizing and misunderstanding of modern history’s worst genocide. Laurel Leff, a veteran journalist and professor of journalism, recounts how personal relationships at the newspaper, the assimilationist tendencies of The Times’ Jewish owner, and the ethos of mid-century America, all led The Times to consistently downplay news of the Holocaust. It recalls how news of Hitler’s ’final solution’ was hidden from readers and - because of the newspaper’s influence on other media - from America at large. Buried by The Times is required reading for anyone interested in America’s response to the Holocaust and for anyone curious about how journalists determine what is newsworthy.

Book Review

Click for more detail about Liberties Lost: The Indigenous Caribbean and Slave Systems by Hilary Beckles Liberties Lost: The Indigenous Caribbean and Slave Systems

by Hilary Beckles
Cambridge University Press (Nov 18, 2004)
Read Detailed Book Description


Written by two of the Caribbean’s leading historians, Liberties Lost is an essential book for students engaged in following courses on the history of the Caribbean. It will also be of interest to general readers seeking information on the history of the region. Starting with indigenous societies, Liberties Lost covers Europe’s Caribbean project, European settlement and rivalry, the Transatlantic trade in enslaved Africans; sugar and slavery; African culture and community life; revolt and resistance and, finally, Caribbean emancipation.


Click for more detail about Eyes off the Prize: The United Nations and the African American Struggle for Human Rights, 1944-1955 by Carol Anderson Eyes off the Prize: The United Nations and the African American Struggle for Human Rights, 1944-1955

by Carol Anderson
Cambridge University Press (Apr 21, 2003)
Read Detailed Book Description


As World War II drew to a close and the world awakened to the horrors wrought by white supremacists in Nazi Germany, the NAACP and African-American leaders sensed an opportunity to launch an offensive against the conditions of segregation and inequality in the United States. The "prize" they sought was not civil rights, but human rights. Only the human rights lexicon, shaped by the Holocaust and articulated by the United Nations, contained the language and the moral power to address not only the political and legal inequality but also the education, health care, housing, and employment needs that haunted the black community. The NAACP understood this and wielded its influence and resources to take its human rights agenda before the United Nations. But the onset of the Cold War and rising anti-communism allowed powerful southerners to cast those rights as Soviet-inspired and a threat to the American "ways of life." Enemies and friends excoriated the movement, and the NAACP retreated to a narrow civil rights agenda that was easier to maintain politically. Thus the Civil Rights Movement was launched with neither the language nor the mission it needed to truly achieve black equality. Carol Anderson is the recipient of major grants from the Ford Foundation and the American Council of Learned Societies, and numerous awards for excellence in teaching. Her scholarly interests are 20th century American, African-American, and diplomatic history, and the impact of the Cold War and U.S. foreign policy on the struggle for black equality in particular. Her publications include "From Hope to Disillusion published in Diplomatic History and reprinted in The African-American Voice in U.S. Foreign Policy.


Click for more detail about Edouard Glissant by J. Michael Dash Edouard Glissant

by J. Michael Dash
Cambridge University Press (Feb 24, 1995)
Read Detailed Book Description


In this first full-length study of Glissant’s creative and theoretical work J. Michael Dash examines his poems, novels, plays and essays in the context of modern French literary movements and the post-negritude Caribbean situation, providing both a useful introduction to, and a challenging assessment of, Glissant’s work to date. Dash shows how Glissant has focused in an unprecedented way on the Caribbean in terms of the diverse and hybrid culture that has been created in the region, and how his ideas on a cross-cultural poetics are the shaping force in the francophone Caribbean ’Creolite’ movement.


Click for more detail about Discrepant Engagement: Dissonance, Cross-Culturality and Experimental Writing by Nathaniel Mackey Discrepant Engagement: Dissonance, Cross-Culturality and Experimental Writing

by Nathaniel Mackey
Cambridge University Press (Sep 24, 1993)
Read Detailed Book Description


Discrepant Engagement addresses work by a number of authors not normally grouped under a common rubric—black writers from the United States and the Caribbean and the so-called Black Mountain poets. Nathaniel Mackey examines the ways in which the experimental aspects of their work advance a critique of the assumptions underlying conventional perceptions and practice. Arguing that the work of these writers engages the discrepancy between presumed norms and qualities of experience such norms fail to accommodate, Mackey highlights their valorization of dissonance, divergence and formal disruption. He advances a cross-cultural mix that is uncommon in studies of experimental writing, frequently bringing the works and ideas of the authors it addresses into dialogue and juxtaposition with one another, insisting that parallels, counterpoint and relevance to one another exist among writers otherwise separated by ethnic and regional boundaries.


Click for more detail about Pragmatism in the Age of Jihad: The Precolonial State of Bundu by Michael A. Gomez Pragmatism in the Age of Jihad: The Precolonial State of Bundu

by Michael A. Gomez
Cambridge University Press (Feb 26, 1993)
Read Detailed Book Description


Bundu is an anomaly among the precolonial Muslim states of West Africa. Founded during the jihads which swept the savannah in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, it developed a pragmatic policy, unique in the midst of fundamentalist, theocratic Muslim states. Located in the Upper Senegal and with access to the Upper Gambia, Bundu played a critical role in regional commerce and production and reacted quickly to the stimulus of European trade. Drawing on a wide range of sources both oral and documentary, Arabic, English and French, Dr. Gomez provides the first full account of Bundu’s history. He analyzes the foundation and growth of an Islamic state at a crossroads between the Saharan and trans-Atlantic trade, paying particular attention to the relationship between Islamic thought and court policy, and to the state’s response to militant Islam in the early nineteenth century.


Click for more detail about Assertion and Conditionals (Cambridge Studies in Philosophy) by Kwame Anthony Appiah Assertion and Conditionals (Cambridge Studies in Philosophy)

by Kwame Anthony Appiah
Cambridge University Press (Oct 31, 1985)
Read Detailed Book Description


This book develops in detail the simple idea that assertion is the expression of belief. In it the author puts forward a version of ’probabilistic semantics’ which acknowledges that we are not perfectly rational, and which offers a significant advance in generality on theories of meaning couched in terms of truth conditions. It promises to challenge a number of entrenched and widespread views about the relations of language and mind. Part I presents a functionalist account of belief, worked through a modified form of decision theory. In Part II the author generates a theory of meaning in terms of ’assertibility conditions’, whereby to know the meaning of an assertion is to know the belief it expresses.