3 Books Published by New York University Press on Our Site — Book Cover Mosaic

Click for more detail about Beyond Hashtags: Racial Politics and Black Digital Networks by Sarah Florini Beyond Hashtags: Racial Politics and Black Digital Networks

by Sarah Florini
New York University Press (Dec 03, 2019)
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How black Americans use digital networks to organize and cultivate solidarity

Unrest gripped Ferguson, Missouri, after Mike Brown, an unarmed black teenager, was shot and killed by Officer Darren Wilson in August 2014. Many black Americans turned to their digital and social media networks to circulate information, cultivate solidarity, and organize during that tumultuous moment. While Ferguson and the subsequent protests made black digital networks visible to mainstream media, these networks did not coalesce overnight. They were built and maintained over years through common, everyday use.

Beyond Hashtags explores these everyday practices and their relationship to larger social issues through an in-depth analysis of a trans-platform network of black American digital and social media users and content creators. In the crucial years leading up to the emergence of the Movement for Black Lives, black Americans used digital networks not only to cope with day-to-day experiences of racism, but also as an incubator for the debates that have since exploded onto the national stage. Beyond Hashtags tells the story of an influential subsection of these networks, an assemblage of podcasting, independent media, Instagram, Vine, Facebook, and the network of Twitter users that has come to be known as "Black Twitter." Florini looks at how black Americans use these technologies often simultaneously to create a space to reassert their racial identities, forge community, organize politically, and create alternative media representations and news sources. Beyond Hashtags demonstrates how much insight marginalized users have into technology.


Click for more detail about More Beautiful and More Terrible: The Embrace and Transcendence of Racial Inequality in the United States by Imani Perry More Beautiful and More Terrible: The Embrace and Transcendence of Racial Inequality in the United States

by Imani Perry
New York University Press (Feb 28, 2011)
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"Perry offers an insightful ’third way’ analysis...the book...is a good fit for cutting-edge graduate and faculty research."-M. Christian, Choice


Click for more detail about Times Square Red, Times Square Blue by Samuel R. Delany Times Square Red, Times Square Blue

by Samuel R. Delany
New York University Press (Nov 01, 2001)
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If one street in America can claim to be the most infamous, it is surely 42nd Street. Between Seventh and Eighth Avenues, 42nd Street was once known for its peep shows, street corner hustlers and movie houses. Over the last two decades the notion of safety-from safe sex and safe neighborhoods, to safe cities and safe relationships-has overcome 42nd Street, giving rise to a Disney store, a children’s theater, and large, neon-lit cafes. 42nd Street has, in effect, become a family tourist attraction for visitors from Berlin, Tokyo, Westchester, and New Jersey’s suburbs.Samuel R. Delany sees a disappearance not only of the old Times Square, but of the complex social relationships that developed there: the points of contact between people of different classes and races in a public space. In Times Square Red, Times Square Blue, Delany tackles the question of why public restrooms, peepshows, and tree-filled parks are necessary to a city’s physical and psychological landscape. He argues that starting in 1985, New York City criminalized peep shows and sex movie houses to clear the way for the rebuilding of Times Square. Delany’s critique reveals how Times Square is being “ renovated” behind the scrim of public safety while the stage is occupied by gentrification. Times Square Red, Times Square Blue paints a portrait of a society dismantling the institutions that promote communication between classes, and disguising its fears of cross-class contact as “ family values.” Unless we overcome our fears and claim our “ community of contact,” it is a picture that will be replayed in cities across America.




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