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richardmurray

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Status Replies posted by richardmurray

  1. now0.jpg

    The article linked below said a lot. What are the points: 

    pay to view streaming platforms is what big media in the USA <big media meaning the largest media concerns by fiscal revenue or scale of viewership> is enforcing. I still agree with BEinsports ceo, streaming needs to be free like broadcasting. I think having people pay for streaming is the financial error. I Think streaming is better free, especially in the USA as the usa market is used to it. 

    The relationship to media in the USA from someone who is five years old today to someone ninety five today is such a vast swing that media in the USA is literally organizing or planning for the five year old who will be ninety five one day. The article misses the role of immigration. Outside the USA broadcast media is usually absent or negligent. PEople forget, most countries never had a PBS. Most countries never had cable stations. Most countries populace has always had to pay for USA media content. So , the immigration populace in the USA culturally supports buying media, cause they are used to it. 

    It isn't mentioned in the article, but one of the realities of the business community/private industry/free market capitalist culture in the USA is the heritage of following, especially in media. USA media has rarely had a set of individual daring firms. MEdia firms in the USA copy each other/follow each other to their dooms, historically. The idea of changing the soap operas, or making them more interesting was too daring for media firms in the usa. The problem with statistics side art is statistics can tell you what people are doing relating to art, but it usually guides you away from what you need to do to reimagine successfully. 

    I concur to the student of media in the article. The mid 1990s and the reality television era coincided to the facebook/twitter era coincided to the death of non special effects films being made mostly. Audiences in the USA during the 1990s were being given a few key things: 1)the ability to make fun of people , whether famous or not, in the public eye in a daily way 2)special effects laden films whose visual stimulus overcame plot or story in ticket sales 3) the role of social media posts over letters or phone calls which meant brevity/publicity/high speed in communication became natural for many people in the USA. Sequentially, soap operas which have moments of laughter but are not meant for self deprication, have no high production value special effects, are slower paced, long form tales, which use a private storytelling to be displayed only on the privy of the show , are against alot of the momentums by user experience. 

    I disagree with the notion that a lack of stay at home parents exists in the USA. Too many people are financially poor in the USA. I argue more parents are stay at home than in the 1960s as a percentage of the whole. but those parents aren't interested in a soap opera and moreover, is financially negative. PEople forget, that the main audience for broadcast media in the USA was the immediate post world war II white community in the USA which was very opulent. We forget that many blacks in the USA in the 1950s 1960s didn't have televisions. so, the financial positivity of the viewership of broadcast media in the USA of the 1950s 1960s where the soap operas come from was racially, monophenotypical/ had a larger percentage of financial positives. 

    The tragedy of this article is it shows how cable is clearly still alive as a medium while many in media have suggested the usa has moved on from cable. it shows how the reality is rarely spoken in modern media in the usa. I repeat, at some point the cable services will figure out how to integrate the streaming services. The streaming services don't want it cause it undercuts their competition with each other. The problem for paid to view streaming is it can only make money by growing subscribers. The whole point of commercials is the commercials pay for the show to be viewed freely, with breaks. Before commercials , firms financed shows whole but that is expensive and too much for most firms. PRoctor and Gamble is a pharmaceutical firm that makes a lot of money.

    I conclude with the strength of telenovelas in latin america. As well as the fantasy shows, game of thrones, as fantasy soap operas. It isn't that soap operas are dead in the USA but they are modulated now. Whereas in the past, humans in a modern setting, with conventional drama was adequate. But in modern USA you need dragons/elves/scenes of mythical war/fantastical extravagance/characters that have insane obsessions that mirror the engineered reality tv chaos to have a  soap opera. 

    https://www.tvinsider.com/1055354/soap-opera-daytime-tv-decline-cancellations/

    1. richardmurray

      richardmurray

      Great share Nike, the biggest absence in the article for me is the problem with opportunity in the arts in the usa. Very few media firms in the usa are standalone, nearly all are part of a larger network of media entities under a firm. If you take out broadcast television stations/cable stations/streaming stations that are not owned by a media conglomerate. How many media entities exist in the usa? pbs is the only broadcast station that is solely a broadcast station. it isn't part of a conglomerate. All the cable stations are part of a conglomerate outside local cable stations , like in NYC for example. All the streaming services with a percent of the streaming audience are part of conglomerates. so... I argue the lack of unconglomerated media properties is part of the problem with this issue that the article didn't state. If the broadcast television stations were unconglomerated like PBS I am certain soap operas would not be streamed, but will have been artistically worked on to improve. My larger thoughts:) https://aalbc.com/tc/profile/6477-richardmurray/?status=2017&type=status

       

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    Tracy Christian via Michelby & Co.

    THOUGHTS TO ARTICLE

    lovely article in some ways. I like her points about what it means a business. A business owner especially for Black people in the USA is not always with the wrappings of white owned business, which is usually better financed. I like what she said about labor populaces. How many are not still multiracial in makeup. I am a peter mensah fan. If they do a shazam <hanna barbera> film, they need to get him 100% if you see him in Hidalgo+ his versatility in other work, you will comprehend. ... I disagree that Black forebears reared us to invade spaces. My parents taught me to be free, not to be an agent for making the monoracial multiracial. I also disagree with sadness that multiraciality is absent in many places. Unfortunately, too many non white europeans don't comprehend that merit and labor opportunities are not connected. You have the right as a president to hire your children. It doesn't make you bad. When one controls who gets opportunity they are not forced to give said opportunities based on certifications or matriculations.

    ARTICLE URL

    https://www.blackenterprise.com/meet-tracy-christian-hollywoods-only-black-talent-agency-owner-expands-while-other-agencies-cease-to-exist/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=news_tab&fbclid=IwAR0nY7wITdR--VWTz0CjVl36HtnGl2YzWYqH0AN9iqcIMGBtniwKbJt54WY

  3. National Association of Black Journalist

     

     

    1. richardmurray

      richardmurray

      Join us for an exciting celebration as we kick off the #NABJNAHJ22 Convention & Career Fair in Las Vegas! This year's Opening Ceremony is powered by Wells Fargo.

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    In one article, the author suggest Hollywood is broken up into parts, a white hollywood side unspoken hollywoods, while also suggesting hollywood is aracial, which means the owners are blocking an inherent universality in hollywood. He suggest Mary Alice isn't a household name, but then states she was a household name in black households... what are the points I am getting at? First, this article doesn't honor Mary Alice enough. It focuses on her work in one show, but doesn't refer to her work in los angeles for an august wilson play. I think fences. Honor artist by referring to their work. Second, for someone who loves to learn about race teaching, the opinion author forgets that opportunity in fiscal capitalism has one source, owner. Opportunity in fiscal capitalism is never about merit. It is about the owner. Who the owner wants to help. I repeat, who the owner wants to help. ... the author's point is Mary Alice was denied the career she should had by the mismanagement of fiscal capitalism in the film /television industry in the USA. Meaning what? The owners of film studios side tv stations <and later streaming/cable or other> should give opportunity based on the content of character, not the color of skin. But, If I own a film studio and I have all the films I want to produce in the fiscal year in preproduction except one. Do I give the one slot, the directors chair, to my son who didn't graduate high school, has no experience in the industry or do I give it to a graduate of howard who won awards from spike lee+ oprah winfrey + robert townsend+ in Nollywood? I will give it to my son. why? I am a racist. My bloodline is important to me over those who are not. Sequentially, i Have a negative bias towards my clan. Penultimate from the conclusion, I use the third point, ownership is the key to opportunity in fiscal capitalism. The owner can choose to give opportunity on some scale of merit. But the owner is not obliged to. You own so that you control what you do, and you can never be wrong. You may lose money. You may be cruel or mean spirited. But you are not wrong because you are the owner. Mary Alice was failed by impotency in Black Hollywood not White Hollywoods opportunity to white thespians OR impotency of Black producers in Hollywood to provide support to Black thespians, not White producers in Hollywoods support of White thespians. I can say more but I will agress

     

    https://www.huffpost.com/entry/mary-alice-career-black-hollywood_n_62e810f7e4b0d0ea9b79a233

     

    Nichelle Nichols side Bill Russell

    https://aalbc.com/tc/profile/6477-richardmurray/?status=2004&type=status

     

    BlackWood

    https://aalbc.com/tc/profile/6477-richardmurray/?status=1981&type=status

     

    P.S.

    The NBA is white owned. The NBA didn't accept the HArlem Rens , who played in the now destroyed Renaissance Ballroom. They had a black owner. The Negro Leagues didn't have all black owners, but had many. The American + National leagues , all with white owners could join but couldn't join with Black owners. 

    Ownership matters. Black people keep suggesting a white man has to look out for non white people in the ownership position. No a white man doesnn't

    1. richardmurray

      richardmurray

      THOUGHTS AFTER THE ARTICLE

      After reading the article below, two points come to mind. First, the court cases that the supreme court is receiving concerning affirmative action are not about Blacks, or Blacks of Africa, it is about Asians, whether White asians or Black Asians, though mostly White asians. 

      Second, the firms argument is the legitimacy <yes the word legitimacy was used> of modernity or the future requires universities to push a multiracial student body. The firms don't say the best always come from the schools, but the best need to come from those schools to go to them. 

      What is the firms point? Firms in the USA have restrictive hiring practices. Built over time, advertised as based on merit. The firms hiring practices are based on universities matriculations. But, universities absent affirmative action will make it costlier for those not white and thus the firms, especially tech firms, links into asia will eventually be thin. 

      What is the argument against affirmative action, in my opinion, not their legal teams words? 

      The argument against is that affirmative action has been used by asian students to get an unfair advantage when most of those asians are not american citizens, or are not in a community that is financially disadvantaged, ala like Native Americans or Blacks.  So USA universities are using affirmative action to gain an international alumni for their favor. Blocking people in the USA who are not more advantaged. To be blunt, in a world with Crazy rich asians, China/Japan/South Korea/India all the top of the list of countries not USA/Western Europe/Russia, the asian community is not disadvantaged. 

      THE ARTICLE

      Apple, GE, other major US companies ask Supreme Court to uphold affirmative action
      The companies said race needs to be considered to help build diverse workforces.

      ByDevin Dwyer
      August 01, 2022, 9:20 AM

      More than 80 major American companies that employ tens of thousands of U.S. workers are asking the Supreme Court to uphold the use of race as a factor in college admissions, calling affirmative action critical to building diverse workforces and, in turn, growing profits.

      The businesses -- some of the most high-profile and successful in the U.S. economy -- outlined their position in legal briefs filed Monday ahead of oral arguments this fall in a pair of cases expected to determine the future of the race-based policy.

      The companies told the court they rely on universities to cultivate racially diverse student bodies which in turn yield pools of diverse, highly educated job candidates that can meet their business and customer needs.
      "The government's interest in promoting student-body diversity on university campuses remains compelling from a business perspective," the companies wrote in an amicus, or friend-of-the-court, brief. "The interest in promoting student-body diversity at America's universities has, if anything, grown in importance."

      Among the signatories are American Express, United and American Airlines, Apple, Intel, Bayer, General Electric, Kraft Heinz, Microsoft, Verizon, Procter & Gamble and Starbucks.

      Citing data and research on a rapidly diversifying America, the companies said race-based diversity initiatives are about more than what many call a moral imperative and critical to their bottom lines.

      "Prohibiting universities nationwide from considering race among other factors in composing student bodies would undermine businesses' efforts to build diverse workforces," they said.

      Eight of the top U.S. science and technology companies, including DuPont and Gilead Sciences, filed a separate brief stressing their view on the importance of racially diverse campuses for cultivating the best future innovators.

      "If universities are not educating a diverse student body, then they are not educating many of the best," they wrote, urging the court not to strike down affirmative action. "Today's markets require capitalizing on the racial and other diversity among us … Those efforts, in turn, contribute to the broader health of our nation's economy."

      In a series of decisions beginning in 1978, the high court has found that race can be used as one factor among many when considering college admissions applications but that a school cannot use quotas or mathematical formulas to diversify a class.

      "In order to cultivate a set of leaders with legitimacy in the eyes of the citizenry, it is necessary that the path to leadership be visibly open to talented and qualified individuals of every race and ethnicity," Justice Sandra Day O'Connor wrote in her 2003 opinion in Grutter v. Bollinger.

      A conservative student group challenging the use of race as a factor in undergraduate admissions at Harvard University, the nation's oldest private college, and the University of North Carolina, the nation's oldest public state university, is asking the court to overturn that precedent.

      The group, Students for Fair Admissions, alleges that Asian-American applicants have been illegally targeted by Harvard and rejected at a disproportionately higher rate in violation of Supreme Court precedent and the students' constitutional rights.

      Two lower federal courts have rejected those claims.

      That the Supreme Court has agreed to hear the cases is widely seen as an indication that the justices could be willing to revisit their precedents on affirmative action and end the use of racial classifications in admissions altogether.

      It will be the first test on the issue for the court's six-to-three conservative-leaning majority, following the retirement of Justice Anthony Kennedy and the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, both of whom defended race-conscious admissions.

      https://abcnews.go.com/US/apple-ge-major-us-companies-supreme-court-uphold/story?id=87638125

       

  5.  

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    Deep Dive Into Building Inclusive Worlds
    Steven Barnes < https://www.facebook.com/groups/1432951630350251/user/604520909/ > of Lifewriting will be teaching  

    When: September 9 – October 9, 2022
    Where: Online — Available everywhere and at your own pace
    Price: $500

    Worldbuilding for speculative fiction and games can be a daunting task; even moreso for writers who want to create inclusive cultures filled with diverse characters without unconsciously replicating colonialist structures and viewpoints. This class offers writers a deep dive into key aspects of building inclusive worlds — Creating Cultures, Ideology, Religion, Cosmology, Sociobiology, Language, Research, and more — with a dream team of outstanding builders of speculative worlds: Steven Barnes, K. Tempest Bradford, Kate Elliott, Max Gladstone, Jaymee Goh, Lauren Jankowski, Pam Punzalan, Nisi Shawl, and Juliette Wade.

    This four-week class includes video lectures and interviews plus extensive discussion and Q&A. Students will leave the class with a deep worldbuilding toolset and resources for further study.

    MORE INFORMATION FOR THE FOLLOWING AT THE URL AT THE END OF THIS POST
    Required Text
    Course Format, Schedule, and Time Commitment
    Accessibility
    Who Should Take This Class?
    Full and Partial Scholarship Opportunities
    Lectures and Interviews + Instructor Bios
    Refund Policy
    Special Offer: Worldbuilding + Research
    Register
    https://writingtheother.com/building-inclusive-worlds-2022/
    Lifewriting group post URL
    https://www.facebook.com/groups/lifewrite/permalink/3106913912954006/

     

     

    1. richardmurray

      richardmurray

      Headshots:

      Lineart- $10

      Flat color-$12

       

      Half bodies:

      Lineart- $12

      Flat colors- $14

      Commissions by Kuroshi-tenshi on DeviantArt

       

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    The tweet in question mentioned 6 things: Keke palmer's career/Zendaya's career/Colorism/Hollywood/Comparing two thespians careers/former child stars careers... The suggestion made in the tweet is that the two child stars have different careers at the moment with zendaya being more and Palmer less, and that contrast is an example of colorism in hollywood. And lastly, that said point warrants a deep inspection to their careers. ... I will start with the point. No two thespians ever have the same careers. Hollywood has never provided two thespians with the same careers. Boris karloff didn't have the same career as bela legosi. Billie D Williams didn't have the same career as James Earl Jones. No two thespians ever have the same career in the film industry anywhere. Jackie Chan didn't have the same Career as samo hung, and that is hong kong cinema. Alec Baldwin doesn't have the same career as Harrison Ford. What is my point? Suggesting that two thespians careers can be defined as different based on a negative bias is a simplicity of how the film industry works. Sharon stone didn't have the same career as Meryl Streep who didn't have the same career as Michelle Pfeiffer. The film industry never is the same for any two thespians. Now, is colorism real. I will define colorism as biases based on skin tone. To the issue in question. The skin tone closer to the average of white europeans is given a positive bias while the skin tone closer to the average of black africans is given a negative bias. Based on my definition of colorism, it is real. But, are the careers of Palmer side Zendaya an issue of said bias or hollywood reality? Based on that logic, Angela Bassett overcame colorism and Vanessa Williams didn't gain enough from it. But is that true? If you look into any two thespians careers the reality is simple. A thespian is lucky if they are involved in fiscally profitable work at a higher rate. Why did Val Kilmer's career, before his illness, not be greater than Tom Cruise? Colorism is real. All biases are real. But are biases the key to success or perceived success in a given space? Not always. The main point of the original tweet, which is a reply, is an assumption, absent any way to be proven. As Palmer correctly stated, Keke palmer's career is keke palmer's. I add, Zendaya's career is Zendaya's. Comparing artist careers based on negative biases in any industry isn't acceptable unless it is an industry normal. For example, Judy Garland was born the same year as Dorothy Dandridge. Both are well known singers. Both played in well-known roles. Was dorothy dandridge blockaded from roles as a black person in hollywood that Judy Garland wasn't as a white person in hollywood? yes. But that was an industry standard at that time, in all areas. Black characters were intentionally not written. Black writers were intentionally not hired. Black producers only existed in the independent system, not hollywood. Colorism like all biases is real and still exists, throughout all aspects of humanity. But, a bias must be universally applied in an arena to claim its potency, not existence but potency, absent strict proof. Lastly... the tweet that is the source of the article's debate is a reply. In the original tweet, linked below, Keke PAlmer is praised. Zendaya isn't mentioned. And, the viewpoint that Keke Palmer is a recent star is challenged as historically inaccurate using the posters life. 

    Why do I say this? I argue the BET article is dysfunctional. If you simply go to the original post. You will see the source post. They are not even connected in theme. And, I argue that Keke Palmer in replying to the colorism point has either bad media management, cause many stars do not make their own tweets, or enough people she cars about mentioned this that she felt she needed to speak. I will also add, in modern times, sometimes making negative issues loud is a way to become more popular. 

     

    THE ARTICLE

    https://www.bet.com/article/mkptst/keke-palmer-zendaya-colorism-twitter

     

    the tweet in question, THE REPLY

    https://twitter.com/NBAgladiator/status/1550912209668153348

     

    the original tweet, THE SOURCE

    https://twitter.com/aiyanaish/status/1550873544850014209

     

    1. richardmurray

      richardmurray

      My common out prose for this entry 

       

      The tweet that is referenced in the article is a reply to a source tweet. The source tweet doesn't mention Zendaya, supports Keke palmer's long acquired superstardom, and is confused as to the people who didn't know of palmer already. ... What is my point? The tweet in question refutes the original post absent any explanation. And I know I am about to go away from the issues. But, one of the problems with media through electronic devices is that many of the websites designed generate dysfunctional multilog. If I say< tweet> the following: "the sky is red, always was and always will be, my parents told me." If someone reshare my tweet , adding the following text: "The sky is really blue, where do the red sky people come from. Volvanoes are red". It is simply a refute. But then if the sky tweet:" I think I am the sky, and the sky has been around for a long time however I like" Then an article from NET<nature elements television> states: "sky responds to colorism about Volcano" and refers to the tweet replied from mine . What I see is a dysfunction in the structure of media. And I will say what I said many times before. I think website design needs to be changed. but I will not make that pulpit speech again 
      https://aalbc.com/tc/profile/6477-richardmurray/?status=2000&type=status

       

  7. Someone in the internet asked

    IS SUPERMAN OUTDATED?!? Thoughts? and what would you do differently?

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    My reply
    Related to what? no I am joking... Outdated suggest a character no longer reflects a present culture. The blunt truth is, no character is ever outdated. Right now many white women in the usa still have a dream of the south that is reflected in "Gone With The Wind"... Now if Outdated suggest a character no longer reflect a majority culture in the present. Then superman is up for debate. In the USA, many black people whose forebears were enslaved by whites will vehemently oppose a black person who only negative action to whites is speaking prejudicely to whites. In the USA, many whites dream for the usa to return to a place where the law supports advantages by being white in all communal quarters or legal levels. In South Africa, many Black people resent with hatred nelson mandela for they see him as a traitor to black freedom. In South Africa, many white people intentionally integrate in their personal or work life all phenotypical groups  in south africa , within their power, to fight against the historical legacy that made south africa.  why do I say all this? Superman is a nonhuman, not a child of earth, who is phenotypically a white european. Anyone can research superman's comic book history and find an example of him supporting a negative view whites have to non whites or men to women, through some action or involvement to another character. Is Superman outdated to a majority in the USA or the greater humanity? I will say superman always was.   Do many people like the idea of a powerful being beyond the control of humanity helping humans? yes. But do most in humanity want all people in humanity to be happy or healthy or just themselves and those in their clan? History in the past or modernity proves most in humanity, are not willing to kill another human, but if those willing to kill in their clan keep their clan empowered over others, they may speak against it but they will aid or abet that empowerment.  Superman was or is outdated. Now what will I do? Yes, I wrote stories of children from outside earth to earh. But if someone asked me what Superman needs most after near one hundred years of publication or media history. I think superman needs to be set on a plot path and stay on that plot path regardless of fan reception or anything else for one hundred years. No character is beloved by all. but, superman like most comic book characters of the usa's great flaw is all the reboots of their storylines. Imagine if superman would had remained a consistent story from his original self.  So I will return superman to his original power levels: super lifting<a skyscraper not a continent>, super running<a high speed train not the speed of light>, super leaping<over a skyscraper not to the upper atmosphere>,super tough skin<a bullet, not a high powered or nuclear missle>, super eyesight/hearing/smelling/tasting. No flying, no eyelasers, no ice breath, no ability to not breath and function,no immortality.   And from origin story just one hundred years from that period, no power changes and all characters stay true to themselves, and age appropriately including superman. If Discovery channel gave superman me to handle, that is what I will do. And yes, I think the whole kryptonian destruction plot is silly, and a character I made from another planet will never have such an origin story but... there you have it. what say you? 
     

    1. richardmurray

      richardmurray

      some think to recast tchalla with the same thinking as superman/james bond...thus why 007 is being separated from james bond, 007 doesn't have to be james bond, black panther in the marvel universe isn't always tchalla... 

       

    1. richardmurray

      richardmurray

      THE HISTORIC MICHIGAN STREET BAPTIST CHURCH

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      Yesterday, along with many other people across the city, I partook in Doors Open Buffalo where many buildings and businesses across the city--as the name suggests--opened their doors to the public. Planning on stopping at and photographing 4 or 5 churches I ended up at just this one; the Michigan Street Baptist Church.

      This church is important and historic for many reasons. One is its age. The congregation was first formed in 1836 and the building itself completed in 1849. But it is the congregation itself that is important as well..this was the first black church of any denomination in the city of Buffalo. This, and also the fact that they were instrumental in the success of the Underground Railroad. Not only did they hide freed slaves, they helped get them safely across the border to Canada.

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      After visiting their humble sanctuary I was about to leave and move on the the next church when I heard someone say, "Don't forget to visit the basement, Bishop Henderson is giving tours."

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      Upon entering the small basement I saw an elderly man who looked more like a Rabbi talking with a handful of people. This was Bishop Henderson. Affiliated with the church for more than 50 years, he was a wealth of knowledge and more than eager to talk about what he knew. When I asked if he still preached he turned to me and said simply, "Why yes, I still do." He also seemed a bit surprised and shy when I asked if I could take his photo but he obliged. His first name is William and he was originally refereed to as Brother Billy because he began preaching on Buffalo's East Side street corners at the ripe age of 14 [source].

      Among the many things he told us ("Should I go on?" he would ask, "because I can talk about this all day") two of the most moving things to me were the poster directly below and also the small passageway where they hid escaped slaves.

      The poster is a replica of an actual one that was common of the time. There were a few deeply disturbing things the Bishop pointed out. Out of the 18 women for sale, 8 of them came with "future insurance," meaning they could still bear children. So in essence, pay for the price of one human and you have the potential of receiving more. Even more chilling is on of the descriptions for the 6 girls, "bud'n out." This meant two things. Because the girls were in puberty ("bud'n out") they were available for the slave owners personal pleasure and also had the possibility of having children; more "future insurance." He also pointed to the bottom of the poster where these humans for sale were lumped into the same category as horses, cows, hogs, bulls, goats, and even wagons.

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      The cramped passage in the building where they hid escaped slaves--between the foundation and a wall--was at one time covered over, the Bishop told us, but at some point years ago they uncovered it as not to forget. How could anyone possibly forget this, I thought to myself.

      After spending some time listening to Bishop Henderson I left and felt sad and weak. I also felt inspired. While slavery was, as Bishop Henderson put it, "A very dark period in our country's history," and without doubt racism is alive and well in America, there is also a new awareness which to me is a new hope. Nearly all of the visitors in the church yesterday were white, which I found interesting.

      As I left the church and turned and looked back the front door was open; it looked so welcoming. I felt a slight chill in the air, and I thanked our creator for the work this church has done.
       

       

      https://www.urbansimplicity.com/2019/06/the-historic-micigan-street-baptist.html

  8. I wonder how many Black women have reached orgasm before 30 while interacting with a black man. The only way is to ask all black women and no one has done that for any question. all polls are merely averages. But I bet most black women have never reached an orgasm in their entire life time side any man and that includes sadly, my fellow Black men. 
    The article below deals with a film that is a fiction about a woman on a quest to have an orgasm who never did before and is a mother of adult children and the wife of a deceased man.
    But I think the topic is true. Many of my fellow males, including me, can be insensitive to women in intimate scenarios and that leads to women not being pleased. I know for sure, through offline talks that many men, not all but many, believe all every woman needs is a thick penis in them to be aroused and that simply is a lie. 
    But it is a lie that many men have been taught to be truth by other men, especially their elders in their homes. 
    But I wonder, I think if every black woman can say by her third intimate experience with a black man she had an orgams, regardless of when that will be a nice communal achievement of change.

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    Emma Thompson and the Challenge of Baring All Onscreen at 63
    The actress made the choice to disrobe. Still, she says, it was the most difficult thing she’s ever done in her four-decade career.

    By Nicole Sperling
    June 15, 2022
    It’s the shock of white hair you notice first on Emma Thompson, a hue far more chic than anything your average 63-year-old would dare choose but one that doesn’t ignore her age either. It’s accompanied by that big, wide smile and that knowing look, suggesting both a wry wit and a willingness to banter.

    And yet, Thompson begins our video call by MacGyvering her computer monitor with a piece of paper and some tape so she can’t see herself. “The one thing I can’t bear about Zoom is having to look at my face,” she said. “I’m just going to cover myself up.”

    We are here across two computer screens to discuss what is arguably her most revealing role yet. In the new movie “Good Luck to You, Leo Grande,” directed by Sophie Hyde, Thompson is emotionally wrought and physically naked, and not in a lowlight, sexy kind of way.

    Thompson plays Nancy, a recently widowed, former religious schoolteacher who has never had an orgasm. At once a devoted wife and a dutiful mother harboring volumes of regret for the life she didn’t live and the dull, needy children she raised, Nancy hires a sex worker — a much younger man played by relative newcomer Daryl McCormack (“Peaky Blinders”) — to bring her the pleasure she’s long craved. The audience gets to follow along as this very relatable woman — she could have been your teacher, your mother, you — who in Thompson’s words “has crossed every boundary she’s ever recognized in her life,” grapples with this monumental act of rebellion.

    “Yes, she’s made the most extraordinary decision to do something very unusual, brave and revolutionary,” Thompson said from her office in North London. “Then she makes at least two or three decisions not to do it. But she’s lucky because she has chosen someone who happens to be rather wise and instinctive, with an unusual level of insight into the human condition, and he understands her, what she’s going through, and is able gently to suggest that there might be a reason behind this.”

    Thompson met the challenge with what she calls “a healthy terror.” She knew this character at a cellular level — same age, same background, same drive to do the right thing. “Just a little sliver of paper and chance separates me from her,” she quipped.

    Yet the role required her to reveal an emotional and physical level of vulnerability she wasn’t accustomed to. (To ready themselves for this intimate, sex-positive two-hander that primarily takes place in a hotel room, Thompson, McCormack and Hyde have said they spent one of their rehearsal days working in the nude.) Despite a four-decade career that has been lauded for both its quality and its irreverence and has earned her two Academy Awards, one for acting (“Howards End”) and one for writing (“Sense and Sensibility”), Thompson has appeared naked on camera only once: in the 1990 comedy “The Tall Guy,” opposite Jeff Goldblum.

    She said she wasn’t thin enough to command those types of skin-baring roles, and though for a while she tried conquering the dieting industrial complex, starving herself like all the other young women clamoring for parts on the big screen, soon enough she realized it was “absurd.”

    “It’s not fair to say, ‘No, I’m just this shape naturally.’ It’s dishonest and it makes other women feel like [expletive],” she said. “So if you want the world to change, and you want the iconography of the female body to change, then you better be part of the change. You better be different.”

    For “Leo Grande,” the choice to disrobe was hers, and though she made it with trepidation, Thompson said she believes “the film would not be the same without it.” Still, the moment she had to stand stark naked in front of a mirror with a serene, accepting look on her face, as the scene called for, was the most difficult thing she’s ever done.

    “To be truly honest, I will never ever be happy with my body. It will never happen,” she said. “I was brainwashed too early on. I cannot undo those neural pathways.”

    She can, however, talk about sex. Both the absurdities of it and the intricacies of female pleasure. “I can’t just have an orgasm. I need time. I need affection. You can’t just rush to the clitoris and flap at it and hope for the best. That’s not going to work, guys. They think if I touch this little button, she’s going to go off like a Catherine wheel, and it will be marvelous.”

    There is a moment in the movie when Nancy and Leo start dancing in the hotel room to “Always Alright” by Alabama Shakes. The two are meeting for a second time — an encounter that comes with a checklist of sexual acts Nancy is determined to plow through (pun intended). The dance is supposed to relieve all her type-A, organized-teacher stress that’s threatening to derail the session. Leo has his arms around her neck, and he’s swaying with his eyes closed when a look crosses Nancy’s face, one of gratitude and wistfulness coupled with a dash of concern.

    To the screenwriter, Katy Brand, who acted opposite Thompson in the second “Nanny McPhee” movie and who imagined Thompson as Nancy while writing the first draft, that look is the point of the whole movie.

    “It’s just everything,” Brand said. “She feels her lost youth and the sort of organic, natural sexual development she might have had, if she hadn’t met her husband. There is a tingling sense, too, not only of what might have been but what could be from now on.”

    Brand is not the first young woman to pen a script specifically for Thompson. Mindy Kaling did it for her on “Late Night,” attesting that she had loved Thompson since she was 11. The writer Jemima Khan told Thompson that she had always wanted the actress to be her mother, so she wrote her a role in the upcoming film “What’s Love Got to Do With It?”

    “I think the thing that Emma gives everybody and what she does in person to people, and also via the screen, is that she always somehow feels like she’s on your side,” Brand said. “And I think people really respond to that. She will meet you at a very human level.”

    The producer Lindsay Doran has known Thompson for decades. Doran hired her to write “Sense and Sensibility” after watching her short-lived BBC television show “Thompson” that she wrote and starred in. The two collaborated on the “Nanny McPhee” movies, and are working on the musical version, with Thompson handling the book and co-writing the songs with Gary Clark (“Sing Street”).

    To the producer, the film is the encapsulation of a writer really understanding her actress.

    “It felt to me like Katy knew the instrument, and she knew what the instrument was capable of within a few seconds,” Doran said. “It isn’t just, over here I’m going to be dramatic. And over here, I’m going to be funny, and over here I’m going to be emotional. It can all go over her face so quickly, and you can literally say there’s this feeling, there’s this emotion.”

    Reviewing “Leo Grande,” for The New York Times, Lisa Kennedy called Thompson “terrifically agile with the script’s zingers and revelations,” while Harper’s Bazaar said Thompson was “an ageless treasure urgently overdue for her next Oscar nomination.”

    The obvious trajectory for a film like this should be an awards circuit jaunt that would probably result in Thompson nabbing her fifth Oscar nomination. But the film, set to debut on Hulu on Friday, will not have a theatrical release in the United States.

    Thompson doesn’t mind. “It is a small film with no guns in it, so I don’t know how many people in America would actually want to come see it,” she said with a wink.

    That may be true. But more consequently, because of a rule change by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences that reverts to prepandemic requirement of a seven-day theatrical release, “Good Luck to You, Leo Grande” is not eligible for Oscar consideration, a reality that the director Sophie Hyde is not pleased with.

    “It’s really disappointing,” Hyde said. “I understand the desire to sort of protect cinema, but I also think the world has changed so much. Last year, a streaming film won best picture.” She argued that her film and others on streaming services aren’t made for TV. They are cinematic, she said, adding, “That’s what the academy should be protecting, not what screen it’s on.”

    Thompson, for one, seems rather sanguine about the whole matter. “I think that, given the fact that you might have a slightly more puritanical undercurrent to life where you are, that it might be easier for people to share something as intimate as this at home and then be able to turn it off and make themselves a nice cup of really bad tea,” said Thompson, laughing. “None of you Americans can make good tea.”

    Nicole Sperling is a media and entertainment reporter, covering Hollywood and the burgeoning streaming business. She joined The New York Times in 2019. She previously worked for Vanity Fair, Entertainment Weekly and The Los Angeles Times. @nicsperling

    https://www.nytimes.com/2022/06/15/movies/emma-thompson-good-luck-to-you-leo-grande.html

     

    IN AMENDMENT

    Again, the problem with Black people is we talk about finance in such a legal way, White people make money based on whatever it takes, not within a system. and the reality is, black people's leaders in the usa have chosen to lead the legal way for their own agenda , which doesn't help black people en large.

    Lavish Money Laundering Schemes Exposed in Canada
    Government officials in the province of British Columbia were aware that suspicious money was entering their revenue stream, but took insufficient steps to stop it.

    By Catherine Porter, Vjosa Isai and Tracy Sherlock
    Published June 15, 2022
    Updated June 17, 2022
    VANCOUVER — Self-professed students were buying multimillion-dollar homes in the Vancouver area, with dubious sources of income, or none at all.

    A family of modest means transferred at least 114 million Canadian dollars to British Columbia.

    Loan sharks cleaned their dirty money by giving garbage bags and hockey bags full of illicit Canadian 20 dollar bills to gamblers who took it onto casino floors.

    Those were just some of the findings from a long-awaited report into money laundering in Canada’s western province of British Columbia, which after two years of testimony was finally released by a special commission on Wednesday.

    Canada is a “major money laundering country,” with weak law enforcement and gaps in its laws, that put it on a list of countries that included Afghanistan, China and Colombia, according to a 2019 report by the State Department.

    Few places in Canada launder as much money as the province of British Columbia, specifically the region around Vancouver, which has one of the country’s biggest underground economies. The province has earned an international reputation as a haven for “snow washing” — a term for money laundering in Canada, according to government officials.

    Billions of dollars a year have been laundered there by criminals, using tactics such as gambling in casinos, buying and selling luxury goods and taking out residential mortgages that are paid off in cash installments small enough not to trigger any alarm bells.

    British Columbia’s gambling industry is a cash cow for the provincial government. At its height in 2015-2016, gambling generated a record 3.1 billion Canadian dollars in revenue, about one-third of which went to the government and was used to finance hospitals and health care, community organizations and other projects.

    The commission was tasked to delve deeply into how bad money laundering in the province had gotten, and whether regulatory organizations, as well as the government itself, had failed to stem it, or even worse, turned a blind eye to it. While the report found no evidence of corruption, some elected officials were aware that suspicious funds from the gambling industry were entering the provincial revenue stream, but took insufficient action to stop it. One official, the minister then responsible for gaming, took no action.

    The report, more than 1,800 pages long, lays out the staggering scope of money laundering in the province and sets out more than 100 recommendations for addressing it.

    The province should create an anti-money laundering commissioner and a dedicated money laundering investigation and intelligence police unit to address this “corrosive form of criminality,” the report says.

    “Money laundering is fundamentally destabilizing to the society and the economy that we all want for the province,” Austin Cullen, the head of the commission and a former British Columbia Supreme Court Justice, told reporters on Wednesday. “Sophisticated money launderers have used British Columbia as a clearing house or a terminus for laundering an astounding amount of dirty money.”

    The provincial government announced the inquiry in May 2019 after a series of government-sponsored reports found what the commission called “extraordinary” levels of money laundering in the real estate, casino, horse racing and luxury car sectors, fueled in part by the illegal drug trade.

    Books, podcasts and news reports had raised the alarm across the country, accusing gangs in China of importing fentanyl to the Western province, and then laundering the proceeds through casinos and high end real estate, helping to further inflate housing prices in a city already deemed the most expensive for housing in the country.

    A 2019 report to the province estimated that in the prior year, up to 5.3 billion Canadian dollars in laundered money flowed through real estate investments in British Columbia, inflating housing prices by as high as 7.5 percent because they were purchased with the proceeds of crime as a way to clean — or legitimize — that money.

    The commission, headed by Mr. Cullen, a well-respected judge, has been a constant drum beat across the country throughout the pandemic, hearing from almost 200 witnesses, including a former premier, a government minister accused of ignoring warnings about money laundering in casinos because they offered huge revenue for the government, and police officers alleging their investigations into illicit gambling were shut down for similar political reasons.

    Witnesses told the commission how one scheme worked. Rich gamblers from China flew in, wheeling hockey bags stuffed with tens of thousands of Canadian 20 dollar bills to play baccarat at private salons inside Vancouver-area casinos. The money was suspected to come from loan sharks connected to Chinese criminal gangs and drug traffickers. The loan sharks laundered their drug money by lending it to the gamblers, who would in turn repay them with clean money deposited to bank accounts in China or Hong Kong. This became known as the “Vancouver Model.”

    Specialized gambling police and lottery investigators raised an alarm but found their investigations shut down or blocked, or even worse, they were fired, the commission heard. The betting limits in casinos were hiked to 100,000 Canadian dollars per hand, allowing even more money to be laundered.

    British Columbia’s Attorney General David Eby, who has been campaigning against money laundering for many years, told reporters earlier this month he hoped the report would offer his government a road map for turning the province and Vancouver, “into a model for fighting money laundering instead of a center where it takes place.”

    Already, the British Columbia government has taken some steps to combat the problem. It has tightened the rules at casinos, requiring gamblers to declare their source of funds and in 2019, launched a public land ownership registry, requiring certain real estate holders in the province to disclose their owners, particularly those hidden behind shell companies, trusts, partnerships and other “beneficial owners.”

    Correction: June 16, 2022
    An earlier version of this article incorrectly described the actions that the Cullen commission report said provincial government officials in British Columbia took to address money laundering in the gaming industry. The report said that some officials took actions that were insufficient and that one official took no action, not that all officials took no action.

    Catherine Porter, a foreign correspondent based in Toronto, has reported from Haiti more than two dozen times. She is the author of a book about the country, “A Girl Named Lovely.” @porterthereport

    https://www.nytimes.com/2022/06/15/world/canada/canada-money-laundering.html
     

     

  9.  

    It is a video

    MY THOUGHTS AS I WATCHED

    everyone knows that the civil rights act was initially for the black community and became extended to all non white males, and with the immigration act the "flooding" was applied. It shouldn't be a secret.

    But the sister's , the immigration lawyers, point is true. The south carolina guy was rude to her. Yes, illegal immigrants are used to do two jobs: block blacks , descended of enslaved, from a job plus also have a person willing to get a lower wage, who is most illegal immigrants. 

    The lazy narrative is from white media. But, the USA is why countries around humanity are poor, or dysfunctional. From eastern europe to south east asia to west africa to the entirety of south america, the hand of the USA brews dysfunctional poor countries all throughout humanity. Thus drives their populaces desire to immigrate and no country accepts immigration like the usa. It is a perfect circle. 

    The problem I have with the narrator is she is missing the point. She is focusing on the battle for jobs when the true issue is ownership. if Black people owned more then they will not have a problem with wages, cause more blacks are employed by... blacks.  If I own a movie studio , the scale of Disney, and I mostly hire black people throughout the labor sectors then that actually helps black people. 

    Kinda Velloza is correct. Immigrants still pay taxes. 

    The south carolina guy really doesn't like kinda velloza... it stings, I wonder if they know each other or met each other on the talk circuit before cause wow! 

    She is black from guyana, you are black from south carolina, please find a room and have hot sex. 

    To guyana, guyana recently found oil! but the government of guyana isn't some socialist, egalitarian government. It is like Gabon, or Angola, two other recent oil states that , yeah, black oil barons, but these countries don't have governments built on communalization. These governments are tribal in nature. full of clans who place themselves in halls of power. 

    Of course, I have travelled to various places. I know for certain that many tribes in the village exist. 

    I love how Tammi Mac doesn't use the word whites. I know this is fox. I am glad Tariq used that word whites. 

    One point is, this show need to be on TVOne. I am not saying that I want the sister to lose her show, but part of the problem with black people is we have to use black owned media entities more. Even though the scaling of black media is too small. 

    The issue of how Black immigrants from the caribbean or africa view the usa is complex. As people from fiscal poor countries, they adore the possibility in the usa. As black people, they respect the Black populace in the USA. As black people in a country controlled by white power, they know of the phenotypical bias but it is set in stone and has gone on for so long it isn't viewed as challengeable. 

    Gregg Dixon is historically short. Black leaders circa 1860s , in particular the Black church, supported integration. They didn't fight for ownership. They didn't fight for all the things Tariq or Marcel suggested. 

    The problem is complicated for the Black populace in the USA.  

    I love how Tammi Mac admitted Black americans seperate themselves when they get those PHd's and all the panelist laughed:) which is telling.

    I love how the freddi guy wasn't listening and blamed the biden administration for the trump, amazing.

    Kinda Velloza's point is correct about immigration law. The rule of law is supposed to be a factor of peace. if the rule of law doesn't matter to those who are being influenced by the USA, which is illegal immigrants being detained then, it is a slippery slop. 

    Yes, immigrants in latin america, can not walk to spain. And brasil... the flavelas in brasil isn't an upgrade to some one from central america.

    The host forgot the lawyer came from guyana , not ghana. 

    People come to the USA because most governments in humanity are controlled by clans. If you take out, China/Russia/USA/some western european governments, most other governments are run by clans.

    The blood of the murdered native american by whites is actually the foundation of the USA, not the labor of blacks or the domination of whites or the dreams of other immigrants whether unwilling or willing. 

    The problem in this show, like many of these talk shows,  is the points don't lead to solutions.

    Gregg Dixon , who wants to be an elected official, but is part of a party of governance that he himself says is opposed to his position.  So what is the solution. Run independent or start your own party. He loves history. History proves the usa at one time had only one party, then became two and throughout its history has added more and more with varying success.  

    Tariq Nasheed is clearly a DOSer, or I will use his term Foundational Black. But he is an artist, like myself. I am not knocking down being an artists. But, the artists with the most money in modernity, don't control the water, energy, food, construction. Foundational Black Americans need infrastructure support. As an artists, he can only get money for his work. Unless he is going to spend all the money he makes on infrastrcture needs, at best he is like myself at this moment, a charlatan. A pulpiter, which I can't stand, but is the truth. 

    Kinda Velloza says the non immigrant Black populace has to engage more functionally to the USA. And let the immigrant community be. In her mind, Black unity is lose. She accepts the tribes in the village motif I usually use. All she wants is for the various Black tribes to stop attacking each other. 

    Samuel Q Elira is a candidate as well, he wants to make things better. He doesn't have any answers. But he thinks Black people need to unite cross tribes in the village. As an elected official to prince george's , a majority black county I think. Maybe he can usher great inter black communication and effort in that county. 

    I wish the host would had focused on what these people wanted and how to get there. I find most of these shows, not merely black social commentary but white or women or asian or latino or anybody, social commentary shows are focused on cross arguments, when I think statin solutions is a better use of time. 

     

    I love how Kinda got the last word on the south carolina guy:) hilarious:) 

    I laughed a lot, lovely. I love banter. 

    1. richardmurray

      richardmurray

      BLACK PEOPLE IN THE USA ARE NOT IGNORANT, 

      their leaders utilize a strategy that demands of them as individuals to accept an unfair scenario for the sake of peace

       

      The following doesn't relate to Black people anywhere but in the USA...

      Black folks in the USA have always doubted the elephants or the donkeys, the strategy is to make either of them better from the inside. The problem is that strategy while non violent + non confrontational to whites requires a very long time to work. And black leaders have never had the courage to admit to the larger black populace that they must learn to accept abuses on the way. The purpose of the strategy is to be nonviolent or non confrontational to whites and within the black community to make either party stronger and thus mold the usa into the country frederick douglass dreamed it would be. 

      Yes, circa 1965 most Black people had lived a life of fear , remember enslavement wasn't a joke it wasn't merely unpaid labor it was total true domination. So most blacks feared whites in a deep personal way. The majority of black leaders at that time, who were not modern style entertainers, were all advocates and most formerly enslaved. So they al were used to patronage from white people. Thus, between the honest fear plus hatred the majority of black people had side the infatuation with a positive link to whites that most black leaders were addicted to. You get the strategy of working in white institutions: the military <from the army to the local city law enforcer,  instead of promoting a black security/military force>, the two primary parties of governance <I call the donkeys or elephants, focusing on them not making a black party> , white owned firms <ala being ceo's of firms over owning their own>. 

      The end goal is the idea that all peoples in the usa are empowered if all the individuals in each community/race/tribe/group/populace/rank/order/gender/range/language/age/religion or other grouping term place position in what already exist over making distinct alternatives. 

      Native Americans don't need their own military even though they have been tormented by the US military if they join the us military and over time the US military serves them.

      Black Americans don't need to own their own fiscal firms even though they were enslaved to white owned financial operations if they become employed to these firms and over time the firms serves them.

      Women don't need their own governments even though they have been dominated and controlled by men in the US government if they join the US governments and over time the government will serve them. 

      The strategy is individuals push into spaces forcing their makeup to be multiracial, while rejecting their own tribal connections which rejects biases in the future. It is a non violent or non confrontational strategy. 

      The problem is the time it takes for individuals to force a multiracial functionality into monoracial institutions to succeed will be by default longer than anything through violence <war ala most countries history/anarchism/terrorism ala the irish> or tribalism<the nation of islam or the kkk, neither of which represents black or white people but both suggest they do > or communalism <ala the back to africa or booker t washington's movement> 

      Most people get frustrated and most leaders are unable for various reasons to admit to the masses, the one by one of individuals changing institutions will take a very long time and be full of failures/rejections/defeats/pains for most of the people being led. 

      This is why the strong people lead themselves tactic gets mentioned alot. The idea is, if more individuals accept the strategy and what it means. That individuals have to get through the hurdles without help and are not to help others after they do. It will make it faster. But, that is the weakness in the strategy. Humans are by default of the monkey tribe, and monkeys are by default communal. The group always takes precedence over individualism. 

    2. (See 1 other reply to this status update)

  10.  

    It is a video

    MY THOUGHTS AS I WATCHED

    everyone knows that the civil rights act was initially for the black community and became extended to all non white males, and with the immigration act the "flooding" was applied. It shouldn't be a secret.

    But the sister's , the immigration lawyers, point is true. The south carolina guy was rude to her. Yes, illegal immigrants are used to do two jobs: block blacks , descended of enslaved, from a job plus also have a person willing to get a lower wage, who is most illegal immigrants. 

    The lazy narrative is from white media. But, the USA is why countries around humanity are poor, or dysfunctional. From eastern europe to south east asia to west africa to the entirety of south america, the hand of the USA brews dysfunctional poor countries all throughout humanity. Thus drives their populaces desire to immigrate and no country accepts immigration like the usa. It is a perfect circle. 

    The problem I have with the narrator is she is missing the point. She is focusing on the battle for jobs when the true issue is ownership. if Black people owned more then they will not have a problem with wages, cause more blacks are employed by... blacks.  If I own a movie studio , the scale of Disney, and I mostly hire black people throughout the labor sectors then that actually helps black people. 

    Kinda Velloza is correct. Immigrants still pay taxes. 

    The south carolina guy really doesn't like kinda velloza... it stings, I wonder if they know each other or met each other on the talk circuit before cause wow! 

    She is black from guyana, you are black from south carolina, please find a room and have hot sex. 

    To guyana, guyana recently found oil! but the government of guyana isn't some socialist, egalitarian government. It is like Gabon, or Angola, two other recent oil states that , yeah, black oil barons, but these countries don't have governments built on communalization. These governments are tribal in nature. full of clans who place themselves in halls of power. 

    Of course, I have travelled to various places. I know for certain that many tribes in the village exist. 

    I love how Tammi Mac doesn't use the word whites. I know this is fox. I am glad Tariq used that word whites. 

    One point is, this show need to be on TVOne. I am not saying that I want the sister to lose her show, but part of the problem with black people is we have to use black owned media entities more. Even though the scaling of black media is too small. 

    The issue of how Black immigrants from the caribbean or africa view the usa is complex. As people from fiscal poor countries, they adore the possibility in the usa. As black people, they respect the Black populace in the USA. As black people in a country controlled by white power, they know of the phenotypical bias but it is set in stone and has gone on for so long it isn't viewed as challengeable. 

    Gregg Dixon is historically short. Black leaders circa 1860s , in particular the Black church, supported integration. They didn't fight for ownership. They didn't fight for all the things Tariq or Marcel suggested. 

    The problem is complicated for the Black populace in the USA.  

    I love how Tammi Mac admitted Black americans seperate themselves when they get those PHd's and all the panelist laughed:) which is telling.

    I love how the freddi guy wasn't listening and blamed the biden administration for the trump, amazing.

    Kinda Velloza's point is correct about immigration law. The rule of law is supposed to be a factor of peace. if the rule of law doesn't matter to those who are being influenced by the USA, which is illegal immigrants being detained then, it is a slippery slop. 

    Yes, immigrants in latin america, can not walk to spain. And brasil... the flavelas in brasil isn't an upgrade to some one from central america.

    The host forgot the lawyer came from guyana , not ghana. 

    People come to the USA because most governments in humanity are controlled by clans. If you take out, China/Russia/USA/some western european governments, most other governments are run by clans.

    The blood of the murdered native american by whites is actually the foundation of the USA, not the labor of blacks or the domination of whites or the dreams of other immigrants whether unwilling or willing. 

    The problem in this show, like many of these talk shows,  is the points don't lead to solutions.

    Gregg Dixon , who wants to be an elected official, but is part of a party of governance that he himself says is opposed to his position.  So what is the solution. Run independent or start your own party. He loves history. History proves the usa at one time had only one party, then became two and throughout its history has added more and more with varying success.  

    Tariq Nasheed is clearly a DOSer, or I will use his term Foundational Black. But he is an artist, like myself. I am not knocking down being an artists. But, the artists with the most money in modernity, don't control the water, energy, food, construction. Foundational Black Americans need infrastructure support. As an artists, he can only get money for his work. Unless he is going to spend all the money he makes on infrastrcture needs, at best he is like myself at this moment, a charlatan. A pulpiter, which I can't stand, but is the truth. 

    Kinda Velloza says the non immigrant Black populace has to engage more functionally to the USA. And let the immigrant community be. In her mind, Black unity is lose. She accepts the tribes in the village motif I usually use. All she wants is for the various Black tribes to stop attacking each other. 

    Samuel Q Elira is a candidate as well, he wants to make things better. He doesn't have any answers. But he thinks Black people need to unite cross tribes in the village. As an elected official to prince george's , a majority black county I think. Maybe he can usher great inter black communication and effort in that county. 

    I wish the host would had focused on what these people wanted and how to get there. I find most of these shows, not merely black social commentary but white or women or asian or latino or anybody, social commentary shows are focused on cross arguments, when I think statin solutions is a better use of time. 

     

    I love how Kinda got the last word on the south carolina guy:) hilarious:) 

    I laughed a lot, lovely. I love banter. 

    1. richardmurray

      richardmurray

      MY COMMENT ON THE ORIGINAL FORUM POST

       

      Many of these social commentary shows, from like it is with gil noble to le grand librarie in france to this have one , in my view, dysfunctional structure. They don't focus on solving the guests problems with their strategies.

      Gregg Dixon- is trying to be an elected official, whose slogan is to improve the black descended of enslaved community will improve the entirety of the usa.  thus he wants a country whose populace is not mostly descended of enslaved people to support his agenda and use the black populace of south carolina as a seat to make legislative strides to said agenda. But his strategy has flaws. First, he himself admits that the donkeys don't serve his agenda. so he is part of a party of governance against his agenda, by his own words, but has in the other major party a clear opponent to his agenda. He seems to know history somewhat, so he must know the usa first had one party then became two, andrew jackson, then became two major with minors till today. So make a minor party in south carolina's black community is the solution to his strategies flaws. 

      Tariq Nasheed- is an artist. He makes money by people buying his art. But until he makes enough money to financially support Foundational Black Americans, he is merely a preacherman. He is asking a people he stated are historically abused to finance his art work and be inspired by it, but doesn't suggest what he will do if he achieved millions or more dollars for his books. I assume it will be to write another book. 

      Kinda Velloza - is an immigration lawyer whose parents were Black immigrants from Guyana. A country that recently became an oil state and whose government is run by a set of clans, like most nouveau oil state governments of black countries <ala Gabon or Angola> in humanity. Her point from a very fortunate position is Black DOSers need to fight their fight and not attack recent Black immigrants. She admitted her personal tale, which I have heard from many others who are Black but recent immigrant as well. And she admitted it is not up to recent Black immigrants to concern themselves with DOSers fight. so, she offers a strategy that actually has function. Black DOSers get their tribe together, recognize many more Black tribes exists in the usa <jamaican/nigerian/guyanan/indian/ and more>, stop blaming recent Black immigrants from wherever or demanding recent Black immigrants from wherever take up your fight. And Black tribes need to stop hurting each other.  I said in this very community similar. Each tribe has to figure out how to grow and each tribe has different situations. But they can all do it. I will add, lets be better than booker t washington/frederick douglass/web dubois/marcus garvey whose time and movements collided too much. I think douglass and Dubois the younger were particularly negative, whereas Washington + Garvey simply failed to reach where they needed, but the legacy of their movements is in memory. 

      Samuel Q Elira - says he wants to be an elected official of prince george's county which is a black county by majority populace. Financially above average,a la the black rich. so his goal of communal cohesion in prince george's county's  black populace is probably achievable absent any true effort by him. For he didn't suggest any ideas. All he suggested was pleas of positivity or unity. Which are not negatives but are not plans. And prince george's country when DC United , an MLS sports team, had a black majority owner, disproved of a stadium in that county. so, prince george's county has black people in it with money but not necessarily the greatest imagination when it comes to black wealth building. 

       

      My extended comment

      https://aalbc.com/tc/profile/6477-richardmurray/?status=1941&type=status

       

      IN AMENDMENT

      SHows like this need to be on TVOne which is black owned. Why doesn't black enterprise have a show on TVOne for this or Sharpton's action network. I am not knocking the sister, nor do I want fox to cancel her show. Fox black is an attempt by Fox to be more relavant as the murdoch clan broke up the fox media giant into three much weaker pieces, one piece sold to disney. so... I get it, but Black ownership has to be first in the usa, if war or weapons are not be used.

       

      IN AMENDMENT AGAIN- for a little laugh

      For the record,  Dixon wants to lay with Velloza. All men have four women we infatuate with. Ones we love, ones we lust, ones we like, and ones we can't stand. Many black men as boys fantasized about ororo munroe with the iman accent , drawn all inhuman , and reply to her beckoning, I'm comin baby.  .. anyway... The way he kept blocking her speech, it is clear he thinks on her. he literally picked on her. I wish she would had asked him to lick her pussy. I wonder if he would had paused if she did that or had an immediate response, gardless her ring.

    2. (See 1 other reply to this status update)

  11. ProfD  < ProfD - AALBC.com’s Discussion Forums > truth...

     

    truth...

     

    partial , before the secession in the french-british war <called french - indian usually> and after in the war of 1812  you can see the british were willing to use natives or blacks to counter whites in the usa. Which to be blunt, ProfD is strategically a different situation. The british are not good, they were an empire, all empires are based on power, not goodness. but, all empires are willing to make arrangement in their fringes, ala the roman empire which in germania created the seeds for the vandals later. The roman empire didn't love the vandals, but the vandals served a function.  To me , your making too light of the strategic need of the british empire to have a minority in its favor , in the same way the usa supports israel in the arab world. Israel is given constant support, this is not cause most whites in the usa, are in love with white jews, this is cause they serve a function. 

     

    fair enough.. let goodness be where it is

     

    fair enough... I think leaders have levels of quality

     

    and same

     

    I think desire is the most important factor. I have never believed anyone is as ignorant as they seem

     

    Good point, I want to add, dispirited people are the farthest, beyond the mind is the heart. When the heart quits that is stronger than the mind's distance.

     

    I think racism is human and thus as long as humans exists racism will, the question is how we humans manage it. It doesn't have to be managed to obsolescence or cruelty

     

    Cynique < Cynique - AALBC.com’s Discussion Forums >  your right, add the native american. And beyond american, racism is as human as love or hate or selflessness, all are human. Nothing to dispute. Those who complain the most want something in their favor. Black people, native americans, women... have a lot of complaints. Nothing to dispute. The only thing is certain, is sooner or later, everybody gets their time at the top of the pyramid. The question is, will your group be at the top when you are alive:) 

     

    Yeah, justice is abstract because most think justice is about a universal truth or a universal balance, but it itsn't. Justice is determined by that which is in power at the time. Those in power changes and everyone can't be in power at the same time. 

     

    Yeah , it is boring isn't it. But as I have opined alot recently in this forum. If you are bored, try different things. The black populace in the usa has done nearly everything peacefully possible to live integrated with whites.  Very few things black people haven't done to make it better without violence. so... 

     

    thank you for coming out your corner:) 

     

    1. richardmurray

      richardmurray

      Pioneer1 < Pioneer1 - AALBC.com’s Discussion Forums

      In my mind you posit a great question. The IRA was only a few hundred people. So from a historical point of view, I see your point. But in my mind, I wonder. The black community in the usa, like the native american , is in a very unique position. Not in terms of being abused as a minority but in the scale of abuse in the country in question. White jews have always been abused in europe but never to the scale. Even during the nazi era in germany, some white jews were given lenience or ease in a way never given to anyone black, or native american,  in similar moments in the usa. 

      I ponder the question you posit. you didn't ask it, but it is in there. 

       

      Your correct and thus maybe one of the problems. Again, when humans talk of a better tomorrow anywhere, they rarely ask about that which has not occurred. thus my point about a black party of governance. I don't know the future. but if we look at what hasn't happened, what hasn't occurred, maybe that can break the :) boring cycles. Maybe the black populace in the usa has allowed too much individualism in itself. Is the white populace in control in the usa? 100% . I am not suggesting that black people are in control. I am not suggesting anything is easy. but maybe that needs to happen internally in the black populace in the usa.  And I am not suggesting most black people in the usa today are onboard with anything like what I suggests as new things to do. But, maybe we go in circles in the usa cause we are doing the same things.

       

      and your right, my parents were there and didn't shy away from telling me the truth as a child... I can even argue maybe too many black adults lie to black children about the past. again, another thing we don't do.  So many of our forebears didn't speak about the past? was that helpful? perhaps. I am not trying to suggest I have all the answers. but  I argue, black people maybe need to tell our children some hard truths early on. stop expecting them to learn them and instead tell them . Cause I am certain most black parents at least, in certain communities in nyc, are very negligent in speaking about our phenotypical history with whites. I am not talking about telling black children to do good, or to be wary of law enforcement. I mean to get to the nitty gritty of what community did what to make the system of things we live in today... 

       

      I will like to add, black entertainers  in the usa have another issue. As entertainers they all to often live by salary to whites with money who govern the system. sequentially, black entertainers are simply not in a strong enough space in their individual lives to risk communicating to black betterment without concern to white backlash. I concur that many entertainers in their actions show a lack of knowledge to the black populace, or black culture or black history. But I want to add, most black entertainers live with a mask on. And make their individual profit in the least secure financial place, which is the arts. 

      I concur to your point but we black people tend to forget, real estate/manufacturing/energy sector, these industries are not dominated by whites by accident. these industries are where real power resides and as our forebears were enslaved, and our leaders from the end of complete slavery to today haven't led us to make our own space in the usa, we have a long way to go to own/control the kind of resources where a black person can speak without reprimand by whites. We need more than entertainers to be the leaders but as a nonviolent peoples and in my opinion, black people in the usa are the most nonviolent behind the native american, entertainment is one of the few places where we can grow. IT will take alot of time for us to be in control of such industries to speak out in the usa. 

       

       

  12. In this very community I stated and state that one of the problems the Black populace in the USA has is the lack of one attempted idea in its history? 
    Do you know what that is? 
    No it isn't starting businesses. It isn't going to ivy league schools or historical black colleges. It isn't becoming elected officials. It isn't joining the USA military or a local law enforcement. It isn't having many lawyers or doctors or business owners. 
    The Black populace in the USA  has financially tried everything, as individuals or groups. 
    The Black populace in the USA has governmentally not tried everything, as individuals or groups. 
    Yes, Black populace has many independent voters, people who vote based on candidate agenda, in the voting stream. 
    The one major absence in the Black populace historically or modernly is a Black Party to Governance. I rephrase, the Black populace in the USA has never had a rival to the Republicans or Democrats solely for the Black populaces benefit.

    Now, why is that? The answer is long winded , a long history, but simple in function. From the Black minority that fought with the colonists against the British <the Black majority were enslaved> to Frederick Douglass who publicly opposed Haiti, leaving the usa, or Black segregation from whites to former president Barack Obama. Many, usually most in history, Black leaders in the USA support a positive phenotypical integration to Whites. 
    A Black party of governance by default is segregatory in nature. Sequentially, that is why it has not been attempted with the vigor of Black business communities in white cities or Black membership in the US military or other ventures, all of which demand positive integration with whites at their heart to work 
    But, a white man in the article given in total below, states a simple truth. 
    The USA government has a need to be restructured that goes beyond a law being passed. He doesn't suggest a new party of governance is the answer. He suggest the answer is a change in the membership of the donkeys or the elephants. A membership change with those willing to be effective over alliances in public or private or to institutional structures.
    But I argue, from the NAtive American populace to the Black populace < descended of enslaved plus not descended from enslaved> each peoples of color in the USA <non white europeans>  have specific needs that can not be handled by one party of governance. 
    I restate, in the USA no one party can help everybody. Every party of governance has to fail somebody. 
    Thus, Black people in the USA don't need to be an option, they need to be the purpose. 

     

    now1.jpg

    ARTICLE

    EZRA KLEIN

    What America Needs Is a Liberalism That Builds
    May 29, 2022

    Early in Joe Biden’s presidency, Felicia Wong, the president of the liberal Roosevelt Institute, told me < https://www.nytimes.com/2021/09/03/podcasts/transcript-ezra-klein-interviews-felicia-wong.html >  that Biden was badly misunderstood. He’s been in national politics for decades, and so people look at him and “default to a kind of old understanding of what Democrats stand for, this idea that Democrats are tax-and-spend liberals.” Wong thought he wanted more: “What Biden is trying to push is much more about actually remaking our economy, so that it does different things and it actually regularly produces different outcomes.”

    I think Wong was right about what Biden, or at least the Biden administration, wanted. But its execution has lagged its vision. And the reason for this is uncomfortable for Democrats. You can’t transform the economy without first transforming the government.

    In April, Brian Deese, the director of Biden’s National Economic Council, gave an important speech on the need for “a modern American industrial strategy.” This was a salvo in a debate most Americans would probably be puzzled to know Democrats are having. Industrial strategy is the idea that a country should chart a path to productive capacity beyond what the market would, on its own, support. It is the belief that there should be some politics in our economics, some vision of what we are trying to make beyond what financial markets reward.

    Trying to build clean energy infrastructure is a form of industrial strategy. So is investing in domestic supply chains for vaccines and masks and microchips. For decades, the idea has been disreputable, even among Democrats. You don’t want government picking winners and losers, as the adage goes.

    The argument, basically, is this: When governments bet on technologies or companies, they typically bet wrong. Markets are more efficient, more adaptable, less corrupt. And so governments should, where possible, get out of the market’s way. The government’s proper role is after the market has done its work, shifting money from those who have it to those who need it. Put simply, markets create, governments tax, and politicians spend.

    It’s remarkable, the assumptions that lurk beneath what’s taken for common sense in Washington. Consider the phrase “winners and losers.” Winners at what? Losers how? Markets manage such questions through profits and losses, valuations and bankruptcies. But societies have richer, more complex goals. To criticize markets for failing to achieve them is like berating a toaster because it never produces an oil painting. That’s not its job.

    So I won’t say markets failed. We failed. Growth slowed, inequality widened, the climate crisis kept getting worse, deindustrialization wrecked communities, the pandemic proved America’s supply chains fragile, China became more authoritarian rather than more democratic, and then Vladimir Putin’s war revealed the folly of relying on countries we cannot trust for goods we desperately need.

    No one considers this success. Deese, in his speech to the Economic Club of New York., declared the debate over: “The question should move from ‘Why should we pursue an industrial strategy?’ to ‘How do we pursue one successfully?’”

    I am unabashedly sympathetic to this vision. In a series of columns over the past year < https://www.nytimes.com/2021/09/19/opinion/supply-side-progressivism.html , https://www.nytimes.com/2022/02/12/opinion/yellen-supply-side-liberalism.html , https://www.nytimes.com/2022/03/13/opinion/berkeley-enrollment-climate-crisis.html , https://www.nytimes.com/2022/01/16/opinion/biden-obama-economy.html > , I’ve argued that we need a liberalism that builds. Scratch the failures of modern Democratic governance, particularly in blue states, and you’ll typically find that the market didn’t provide what we needed and government either didn’t step in or made the problem worse through neglect or overregulation.

    We need to build more homes, trains, clean energy, research centers, disease surveillance. And we need to do it faster and cheaper. At the national level, much can be blamed on Republican obstruction and the filibuster. But that’s not always true in New York or California or Oregon. It is too slow and too costly to build even where Republicans are weak — perhaps especially where they are weak.

    This is where the liberal vision too often averts its gaze. If anything, the critiques made of public action a generation ago have more force today. Do we have a government capable of building? The answer, too often, is no. What we have is a government that is extremely good at making building difficult.

    The first step is admitting you have a problem, and Deese, to his credit, did exactly that. “A modern American industrial strategy needs to demonstrate that America can build — fast, as we’ve done before, and fairly, as we’ve sometimes failed to do,” he said.

    He noted that the Empire State Building was constructed in just over a year. We are richer than we were then, and our technology far outpaces what was available in 1930. And yet does anyone seriously believe such a project would take a year today?

    “We need to unpack the many constraints that cause America to lag other major countries — including those with strong labor, environmental and historical protections — in delivering infrastructure on budget and on time,” Deese continued.

    One answer — the typical Republican answer — is that government can’t do the job and shouldn’t try. But the data doesn’t bear that out. The Transit Costs Project tracks < https://transitcosts.com/what-does-the-data-say/ >  the price tags on rail projects in different countries. It’s hard to get an apples-to-apples comparison here, because different projects are, well, different, and it matters whether they include, say, a tunnel, which is expensive for all the obvious reasons.

    Even so, the United States is notable for how much we spend and how little we get. It costs about $538 million to build a kilometer (about 0.6 mile) of rail here. Germany builds a kilometer of rail for $287 million. Canada gets it done for $254 million. Japan clocks in at $170 million. Spain is the cheapest country in the database, at $80 million. All those countries build more tunnels than we do, perhaps because they retain the confidence to regularly try. The better you are at building infrastructure, the more ambitious you can be when imagining infrastructure to build.

    The problem isn’t government. It’s our government. Nor is the problem unions — another favored bugaboo of the right. Union density is higher in all those countries than it is in the United States. So what has gone wrong here?

    One answer worth wrestling with was offered by Brink Lindsey, the director of the Open Society Project at the Niskanen Center, in a 2021 paper < https://www.niskanencenter.org/state-capacity-what-is-it-how-we-lost-it-and-how-to-get-it-back/ >  titled “State Capacity: What Is It, How We Lost It, and How to Get It Back.” His definition is admirably terse. “State capacity is the ability to design and execute policy effectively,” he told me. When a government can’t collect the taxes it’s owed or build the sign-up portal for its new health insurance plan or construct the high-speed rail it’s already spent billions of dollars on, that’s a failure of state capacity.

    But a weak government is often an end, not an accident. Lindsey’s argument is that to fix state capacity in America, we need to see that the hobbled state we have is a choice and there are reasons it was chosen. Government isn’t intrinsically inefficient. It has been made inefficient. And not just by the right:

    Highlight : What is needed most is a change in ideas: namely, a reversal of those intellectual trends of the past 50 years or so that have brought us to the current pass. On the right, this means abandoning the knee-jerk anti-statism of recent decades; embracing the legitimacy of a large, complex welfare and regulatory state; and recognizing the vital role played by the nation’s public servants (not just the police and military). On the left, it means reconsidering the decentralized, legalistic model of governance that has guided progressive-led state expansion since the 1960s; reducing the veto power that activist groups exercise in the courts; and shifting the focus of policy design from ensuring that power is subject to progressive checks to ensuring that power can actually be exercised effectively.

    The Biden administration can’t do much about the right’s hostility to government. But it can confront the mistakes and divisions on the left.

    A place to start is offered in another Niskanen paper, this one by Nicholas Bagley, a law professor at the University of Michigan. In “The Procedure Fetish” < https://www.niskanencenter.org/the-procedure-fetish/ >  he argues that liberal governance has developed a puzzling preference for legitimating government action through processes rather than outcomes. He suggests, provocatively, that that’s because American politics in general and the Democratic Party, in particular, are dominated by lawyers. Biden and Kamala Harris hold law degrees, as did Barack Obama and John Kerry and Bill and Hillary Clinton before them. And this filters down through the party. “Lawyers, not managers, have assumed primary responsibility for shaping administrative law in the United States,” Bagley writes. “And if all you’ve got is a lawyer, everything looks like a procedural problem.”

    This is a way that America differs from peer countries: Robert Kagan, a law professor at the University of California, Berkeley, has called this “adversarial legalism” and shown that it’s a distinctively American way of checking state power. Bagley builds on this argument. “Inflexible procedural rules are a hallmark of the American state,” he writes. “The ubiquity of court challenges, the artificial rigors of notice-and-comment rule making, zealous environmental review, pre-enforcement review of agency rules, picayune legal rules governing hiring and procurement, nationwide court injunctions — the list goes on and on.”

    The justification for these policies is that they make state action more legitimate by ensuring that dissenting voices are heard. But they also, over time, render government ineffective, and that cost is rarely weighed. This gets to Bagley’s ultimate and, in my view, wisest point. “Legitimacy is not solely, not even primarily, a product of the procedures that agencies follow,” he says. “Legitimacy arises more generally from the perception that government is capable, informed, prompt, responsive and fair.” That is what we’ve lost — in fact, not just in perception.

    Rebuilding that kind of government isn’t a question of regulatory tweaks and interagency coordination. It’s difficult, coalition-splitting work. It pits Democratic leaders against their own allies, against organizations and institutions they’ve admired or joined against processes whose justifications they’ve long ago accepted and laws they consider jewels of their past.

    The environmental movement cheers when Biden says he wants to decarbonize and fast. But if he said that in order to achieve that goal, he wanted to reform or waive large sections of the National Environmental Policy Act to speed the construction of clean energy infrastructure, he’d find himself at war. What if he decided to argue not just that government workers should be paid more but also that they should be easier to both hire and fire?

    I’ve spent most of my adult life trawling think tank reports to better understand how to solve problems. When I go looking for ideas on how to build state capacity on the left, I don’t find much. There’s nothing like the depth of research, thought and energy that goes into imagining health and climate and education policy. But those health, climate and education plans depend, crucially, on a state capable of designing and executing policy effectively. This is true at the federal level, and it is even truer, and harder, at the state and local levels.

    So this is what I have become certain of: Democrats spend too much time and energy imagining the policies that a capable government could execute and not nearly enough time imagining how to make a government capable of executing them. It is not only markets that have failed.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2022/05/29/opinion/biden-liberalism-infrastructure-building.html

     

  13. etree a paris.jpg

     

    Title: Solitude

    Artist: Didier Audrat.

    Photographer: Entrée to Black Paris

    “ Sculpture of Solitude Unveiled
    Yesterday, a bronze sculpture of Solitude - the Guadelopean woman who was hanged for her part in resisting the reinstatement of slavery in Guadeloupe the day after giving birth - was unveiled in a moving ceremony at Place du Général Catroux in the 17th arrondissement.  The sculpture can be found in the Solitude garden at the northernmost lawn of the square.”
    Solitude unveiled
    Image by Entrée to Black Paris

    1. richardmurray

      richardmurray

      talima by didier audrat.jpeg

      Title: Talima

      Artist: Didier Audrat.

  14. now0.jpg

    I am happy for him, he wanted it. I can't stand when people say, it's never too late. Too late for what? graduating from college doesn't mean anything. Black people need to end that heritage. Graduating from college is not a sign of education, it is a sign of labor. Black people were and are denied in the USA because we don't have power. Black people suggest merit in a community that is not based on merit. the USA is based on power.

    Article

    https://www.today.com/popculture/popculture/anthony-anderson-celebrates-graduating-from-howard-university-at-51-rcna27895

    1. richardmurray

      richardmurray

      now0.jpg

      Happy for her, she wanted it. If I ever become famous as an artists I will reject all honorary doctorates suggested toward me. I despise the idea of some college suggesting that a piece of paper from them represents some mental or cultural or spiritual or heritagwise achievement. silly.

      https://www.bet.com/article/05r4wf/taraji-p-henson-honorary-doctorate-howard-university

  15. People in NYC owe three years rent. Students have debt of decades. 

    It seems the answer from many in the party of andrew jackson is to pay off the financial malaise. But my question is, what about the people in NYC who for three years didn't owe any rent? 

    What about the people who finished school with no debt? 

    Some will say , remember too big too fail. But I argue that explains my point in full. Every single large bank/lender/financial institution in the USA failed. They were the kid that failed to sell lemonade. but they were given a blank check to fully recover. The problem is while said financial institutions had ALL FAILED, they were still kicking people out of their homes for failure to pay mortgages, ending business failed to pay their debts to them. The banks were to big to fail, but the small business and homes the banks dealt with were not. 

    Now, people who owe three years worth of rent are to be given a reprieve in a city whose history of real estate owners treating people who owe one month is not only atrocious it is well documented to be ruthless. And students who owe years of debt must be given a reprieve while people who matriculated without debt are to be told, thanks for doing it. 

     

    IN AMENDMENT

     

    One thing is for sure, the financial underpinnings of the financial system in modern humanity has some gaping holes and the tools to cover them holes are not enough. Everywhere you look from russia being given money for oil by the same countries who are financing ukraine to survive russia's military onslaught. To China's economy producing tons of content for countries all over the world while china uses carona virus restrictions to ban people from entering china. To the government of the usa or the governments of states, claiming they have thousands of open jobs but also thousands of business foreclosures. The financial underpinnings of humanity led by the usa are clearly rocking. 

    https://madamenoire.com/1313902/tudum-layoffs-netflix/

    now0.png

    1. richardmurray

      richardmurray

      forum post

       

  16. NOPE trailer, my thoughts, article

    NOPE.jpg

     

     

    MY THOUGHTS
    ok... What did i see... the main characters, kaaluya and keke palmer live in some western usa area, black cowboy heritage ok.. this is a financially base area. From a simple glance this is the intercontinental railroad movie, black horse riders, an asian with a cowboy hat on  so that is the human side... what is unnatural three things: a cloud that is very thick, and is being influenced. Dust clouds exists but they don't come absent a slow growth of dust. So a thick cloud on a sunny day at ground level at speed absent dust around is unnatural. Next is a body lifting from the ground straight into space. This reminds me of a film with julianne moore about a woman who is trying to remember her child and creatures foreign to earth actually control humanity and use it for experiments. In the film's case to see if the love of a child occurs before or after a child exits the womb. In the film whenever anyone became a threat the aliens lifted them into the sky like they are on a string. functionally a specific while potent  gravitional field is being generated. In my mind maybe a neutron array. but the kind of device to house such a system, right now escapes me. Last is the two fingered fist of a creature under a blanket/cloth/cover bumping fist to a human being. ... A sense of surveillance and a robotic system is present. ... so putting all these things I saw together... I think what we have here is humanity is under the control of creatures, whose descendency is unknown, maybe they are ancient pre humanity , like the guyver , or they are truly extraterrestrial. These creatures are looking for another creature, maybe it is related to them , maybe it is not , but it is also not human. And I think it travels by a cloud... in my mind I think of cowboys and aliens a little as well.  A story where the influence of the alien is one and done, no Nope 2 and Nope the return or Nope Nope. 

    ARTICLE
    'Nope': Jordan Peele explains meaning behind his mysterious new movie's title

    LAS VEGAS – Jordan Peele is doling out a few more details about his cryptic new thriller. 

    The comedian-turned-filmmaker behind "Get Out" and "Us" returns to multiplexes this summer with "Nope" (in theaters July 22), a sci-fi/horror flick starring Daniel Kaluuya, Keke Palmer and Steven Yeun.

    After premiering a terrifying teaser during this year's Super Bowl, Peele gave convention-goers at CinemaCon a clearer look at what's in store with the debut of the movie's first full-length trailer Wednesday.

    Given that it won't be released to the public for "several more weeks," Peele asked the room full of theater owners and journalists to keep the trailer's secrets to themselves. But it's safe to say the new footage earned raves on social media, with people calling it "super cool," "ominous and creepy," and that Kaluuya and Palmer – playing scheming siblings who train horses – are "absolute stars." 

    Introducing the trailer, Peele said he wants to "retain some mystery" around "Nope," whose plot fans have feverishly tried to decipher online.

    "Some (theories) get kind of close," while others "are nonsense," Peele said. But he would allow that it's "definitely a ride," describing it as a movie for "the person who thinks they don't like horror movies." 

    As for the film's monosyllabic title, Peele explained that it was inspired by the reactions he hopes "Nope" elicits. 

    "I love titles that reflect what the audience is thinking and feeling in the theater," he said. "Especially Black audiences: We love horror, but there's a skepticism, like, 'You're not gonna scare me, right?' I'm personally going to thrive on the times I hear 'Nope!' in our theater (when the film is released)." 

    Peele, who won the best original screenplay Oscar for "Get Out" in 2018, said he sees it as his "privilege and responsibility to try and make new films and tell original stories.

    "Until someone tells me I can't, my plan is to bring these new ideas and new dreams and new nightmares to the big screen." 


    https://www.usatoday.com/story/entertainment/movies/2022/04/27/nope-jordan-peele-trailer-cinemacon/9561322002/


    nope 2.jpg

  17. A statistic says that in the usa since 2020 more and more parents are financially supporting children 18 and over, but statistics from labor say jobs are in surplus....

    A statistics from the NYPD says that black hate crimes has gone up 100%, like jeiwsh hate crime, and asian hate crime went down from last year, but nyc media never shows a person not white incarcerated or in police custody after a hate crime to black people...

    The party of andrew jackson tried to gerrymander a map and was found unconstitutional by ny state constitution while state laws in texas or elsewhere allow for gerrymandering, but people keep saying one party or another are decent...

    The lies... amazing:) 

    1. richardmurray

      richardmurray

      In amendment, most of the ny state judges that voted the redistricting map unconstitutional were appointed by andrew cuomo :)

  18. now1.jpg

    I don't know if Frank James was the shooter in the subway, but if he was, he offers an interesting query challenge.

    NYC's black community always had black people in it, who love to suggest a usage of violence is incorrect. The reason why is complicated, it isn't merely about right or wrong. But, one of the juxtaposes between white controlled media of nyc /the black church in the black community of NYC/black employed class in NYC is the idea of gun violence in the Black community as something of youth. The narrative is, the youth must get the violence out of them. But, Frank James is sixty something years old. Frank James was an elder teen in the 1970s. So Frank James is not a Black person who is without a decades long look at the Black community in NYC, in NYS, in the USA and with that a high potential for a very honest while negative appraisal of many things in this area. 

    Many will suggest mental imbalance, as in NYC that is suggested for anyone who is violent. From white media to many or most black homes in NYC, mental dysfunction or imbalance is always the reason behind any violence as if, being violent can not be from a mentally sane person, which of course is a lie. 
     

    A FORUM POST

     

    1. richardmurray

      richardmurray

      @Stefan I explain my positions, it is verbose, but I find online, people love to make positions absent explanation and I oppose that. outside of that, I can only advise you to look at less of my prose

    2. (See 8 other replies to this status update)

  19. now1.jpg

    I don't know if Frank James was the shooter in the subway, but if he was, he offers an interesting query challenge.

    NYC's black community always had black people in it, who love to suggest a usage of violence is incorrect. The reason why is complicated, it isn't merely about right or wrong. But, one of the juxtaposes between white controlled media of nyc /the black church in the black community of NYC/black employed class in NYC is the idea of gun violence in the Black community as something of youth. The narrative is, the youth must get the violence out of them. But, Frank James is sixty something years old. Frank James was an elder teen in the 1970s. So Frank James is not a Black person who is without a decades long look at the Black community in NYC, in NYS, in the USA and with that a high potential for a very honest while negative appraisal of many things in this area. 

    Many will suggest mental imbalance, as in NYC that is suggested for anyone who is violent. From white media to many or most black homes in NYC, mental dysfunction or imbalance is always the reason behind any violence as if, being violent can not be from a mentally sane person, which of course is a lie. 
     

    A FORUM POST

     

    1. richardmurray

      richardmurray

      @Stefan It all boils down to a simple question. 

      Is the Black Individual free to do as they want in the USA today? For many black people, I don't think most but I can be rong,  in the usa the answer is yes. I say this with offline conversations in mind side other Black folk in the usa. Sequentially, if you are Black in the usa and you feel the Black Individual is free to be in the usa, then you may view the power of the White collective is between nonexistent/mute/irrelevant. 

      White power is not an individual force. It is collective, and thus the only way Black people can defend themselves from it is with Black power. but Black power requires a Black communalism/collectivism that by default is against how many Black people in the USA interpret being an individual in the USA. 

       

    2. (See 8 other replies to this status update)

  20. Et Tu War
    My Thoughts To The Article Below

    The great Ali once asked, I paraphrase, why should I go fight vietkong for you when you my poser when I want a job, you my poser when I want rights, you my poser when I try to be happy.
    I recall in a documentary on Public Broadcasting Station concerning the Vietnam war a man who fought for Vietnam against the proxy government set up by the USA in vietnam, that he was the only person in his building to return from going to the war.
    What is the point? 
    Any government that has to force or ask people who live under it to fight for it proves that government is failed. 
    The reason why Black people had to be drafted is cause most Black people couldn't stand the USA and would never willingly take a bullet for a government that oppresses Black people. 
    To the article below, I have never lived in Ukraine or Russia. I know no one in Ukraine or Russia. The article below can be a complete lie. 

    But, if the article below has truth. 
    It makes three things clear. 
    The Ukrainian people are kin to Russian People. They are not distant. These two peoples are in the same way like the Union side the Confederacy.
    The Ukrainian government has forced Ukranian people, especially men: to deny themselves, to deny their personal relationships to Russia, to deny their right to choose.
    A segment of the Ukranian plus Russian people in the USA have a combined agenda that they promote which is telling a lie about the realities of this war, which the USA government supports for global order reasonings.

    Some may suggest I am stating a civil war. I am not. No war is ever civil and that includes the war between the states. I am stating the russian-ukranian war is an intracommunal war, a war within one community. Sequentially, while the Russian sector is the agressor plus the Ukrainian is the subjected. Neither side is absent the other. It is the same thing when Hindus side Muslims fight in India. It is the same with the people of Hong Kong or Taiwan aside the People of Mainland china. It is the same with the people of north korea side south korea. One community can have striking parts and still be one community. The people of ireland are still british even though they bombed everywhere possible in belfast or england they could.

    Now, why have I posted this in a Black communal online group. The question is how Black people see themselves under any government, but especially the USA. How many Black people if they had to choose will fight for the USA? I argue far less. Many Black people talk about enslaved forebears fighting to have the legal rights or communal equality to whites.  But I argue, for each enslaved forebear that wanted equality to all was ten forebears who wanted to merely break the skull of someone not black. 
    When Black people speak of anger or violence being a problem in the Black community, I hope anyone reading this will ask themselves, how many Black people are happy? And if unhappiness is merely a potential reality, not a sign that the mind is unhealthy, then the solution to unhappiness isn't some pharmaceutical product or some talk with someone saying to another they are wrong, but an process that leads to what will make a Black person happy.

    Last question, when the war between ukraine side russia is over, will Ukraine have to give up the weapons they were given by various countries? 

     

    now1.png

    Photo description

    Volodymyr Danuliv, a Ukrainian evacuee, at a center for asylum seekers and refugees in Chisinau, Moldova’s capital. He has relatives in the Russian Army and is determined not to join the fight for Ukraine.

     

    Article

     

    Ukraine’s Draft Dodgers Face Guilt, Shame and Reproach

    April 10, 2022, 1:57 p.m. ETApril 10, 2022
    April 10, 2022
    Jeffrey Gettleman and Monika Pronczuk

    CHISINAU, Moldova – Vova Klever, a young, successful fashion photographer from Ukraine’s capital, Kyiv, did not see himself in this war.

    “Violence is not my weapon,” he said.

    So shortly after Russia invaded Ukraine in late February and Ukraine prohibited men of military age from leaving the country, Mr. Klever sneaked out to London.

    His mistake, which would bring devastating consequences, was writing to a friend about it.

    The friend and his wife then shared the contents of that conversation on social media. It sparked an online fight that went viral, and Ukrainians all over the internet exploded with anger and resentment.

    “You are a walking dead person,” one Twitter message said. “I’m going to find you in any corner in the world.”

    The notion of people — especially men — leaving war-torn Ukraine for safe and comfortable lives abroad has provoked a moral dilemma among Ukrainians that turns on one of the most elemental decisions humans can make: fight or flee.

    Thousands of Ukrainian men of military age have left the country to avoid participating in the war, according to records from regional law enforcement officials and interviews with people inside and outside Ukraine. Smuggling rings in Moldova, and possibly other European countries, have been doing a brisk business. Some people have paid up to $15,000 for a secret night-time ride out of Ukraine, Moldovan officials said.

    The draft dodgers are the vast exception. That makes it all the more complicated for them — morally, socially and practically. Ukrainian society has been mobilized for war against a much bigger enemy, and countless Ukrainians without military experience have volunteered for the fight. To maximize its forces, the Ukrainian government has taken the extreme step of prohibiting men 18 to 60 from leaving, with few exceptions.

    All this has forced many Ukrainian men who don’t want to serve into taking illegal routes into Hungary, Moldova and Poland and other neighboring countries. Even among those convinced they fled for the right reasons, some said they felt guilty and ashamed.

    “I don’t think I can be a good soldier right now in this war,” said a Ukrainian computer programmer named Volodymyr, who left shortly after the war began and did not want to disclose his last name, fearing repercussions for avoiding military service.

    “Look at me,” Volodymyr said, as he sat in a pub in Warsaw drinking a beer. “I wear glasses. I am 46. I don’t look like a classic fighter, some Rambo who can fight Russian troops.”

    He took another sip and stared into his glass.

    “Yes, I am ashamed,” he said. “I ran away from this war, and it is probably my crime.”

    Ukrainian politicians have threatened to put draft dodgers in prison and confiscate their homes. But within Ukrainian society, even as cities continue to be pummeled by Russian bombs, the sentiments are more divided.

    A meme recently popped up with the refrain, “Do what you can, where you are.” It’s clearly meant to counter negative feelings toward those who left and assure them they can still contribute to the war effort. And Ukrainian women and children, the vast majority of the refugees, face little backlash.

    But that’s not the case for young men, and this is what blew up on the young photographer.

    In mid-March, Olga Lepina, a modeling agent, said Mr. Klever disclosed in a text message to her husband that he had paid $5,000 to be smuggled out of Ukraine, and from earlier conversations she knew he had wanted to go to London.

    Ms. Lepina said she and Mr. Klever had been friends for years. She even went to his wedding. But as the war drew near, she said, Mr. Klever became intensely patriotic and anti-Russian, and said rude things to her husband, who is Russian. When she found out he had avoided service, she was so outraged that she posted on Instagram the comments Mr. Klever made insulting her husband, and said he had spent $5,000 to be smuggled out of Ukraine.

    “For me, it was a hypocrisy to leave the country and pay money for this,” she explained, adding, “He needs to be responsible for his words.”

    Mr. Klever, who is in his 20s, fell deeper into an online spat with Ms. Lepina. She and others said he had made insensitive comments about the town of Bucha, the site of major violence and the town she was from. (The comments were made before the atrocities in Bucha were revealed). Mr. Klever was then bombarded with death threats. Some Ukrainians also resented that he used his wealth to get out and called it “cheating.”

    Responding to emailed questions, Mr. Klever did not deny skipping out on his service and said that he had poor eyesight and had “been through a lot lately."

    “You can’t even imagine the hatred,” he said.

    Mr. Klever gave conflicting accounts of how exactly he exited the country and declined to provide details. But for many other Ukrainian men, Moldova has become the favorite trap door.

    Moldova shares a nearly 800-mile border with western Ukraine. And unlike Hungary, Poland, Romania and Slovakia, Moldova is not part of the European Union, which means it has significantly fewer resources to control its frontiers. It is one of Europe’s poorest countries and has been a hub of human trafficking and organized crime.

    Within days of the war erupting, Moldovan officials said, Moldovan gangs posted advertisements on Telegram, a popular messaging service in Eastern Europe, offering to arrange cars, even minibuses, to spirit out draft dodgers.

    Law enforcement officials said the typical method was for the smugglers and the Ukrainians to select a rendezvous point along Moldova’s “green border,” the term used for the unfenced border areas, and meet late at night.

    On a recent night, a squad of Moldovan border guards trudged across a flat, endless wheat field, their boots sinking in the mud, looking for draft dodgers. There was no border post on the horizon, just the faint lights of a Ukrainian village and the sounds of dogs barking in the darkness.

    Out here, one can just walk into and out of Ukraine.

    Moldovan officials said that since late February they had broken up more than 20 smuggling rings, including a few well-known criminal enterprises. In turn, they have apprehended 1,091 people crossing the border illegally. Officials said all were Ukrainian men.

    Once caught, these men have a choice. If they don’t want to be sent back, they can apply for asylum in Moldova, and cannot be deported.

    But if they do not apply for asylum, they can be turned over to the Ukrainian authorities, who, Moldovan officials said, have been pressuring them to send the men back. The vast majority of those who entered illegally, around 1,000, have sought asylum, and fewer than 100 have been returned, Moldovan officials said. Two thousand other Ukrainian men who have entered Moldova legally have also applied for asylum.

    Volodymyr Danuliv is one of them. He refuses to fight in the war, though it’s not the prospect of dying that worries him, he said. It is the killing.

    “I can’t shoot Russian people,” said Mr. Danuliv, 50.

    He explained that his siblings had married Russians and that two of his nephews were serving in the Russian Army — in Ukraine.

    “How can I fight in this war?” he asked. “I might kill my own family.”

    Myroslav Hai, an official with Ukraine’s military reserve, conceded, “There are people who evade mobilization, but their share in comparison with volunteers is not so large.” Other Ukrainian officials said men ideologically or religiously opposed to war could serve in another way, for example as cooks or drivers.

    But none of the more than a dozen men interviewed for this article seemed interested. Mr. Danuliv, a businessman from western Ukraine, said he wanted no part in the war. When asked if he feared being ostracized or shamed, he shook his head.

    “I didn’t kill anyone. That’s what’s important to me,” he said. “I don’t care what people say.”

    What happens when the war ends? How much resentment will surface toward those who left? These are questions Ukrainians, men and women, are beginning to ask.

    When Ms. Lepina shamed Mr. Klever, she was no longer in Ukraine herself. She had left, too, for France, with her husband. Every day, she said, she wrestles with guilt.

    “People are suffering in Ukraine, and I want to be there to help them, to support them,” she said. “But at the same time I’m safe and I want to be here.”

    “It’s a very ambiguous, complicated feeling,” she said.

    And she knows she will be judged.

    “Of course there will be some people who divide Ukrainian nationals between those who left and those who stayed,” she said. “I am ready for that.”

    Siergiej Greczuszkin contributed reporting from Warsaw, and Daria Mychkovska from Przemysl, Poland.

    Correction: April 10, 2022
    An earlier version of this article referred incompletely to the online dispute between Vova Klever and Olga Lupina. In addition to writing a social media post describing Mr. Klever’s avoidance of military service in Ukraine, Ms. Lupina also posted comments she considered insensitive that he made about her husband’s Russian heritage and about Bucha, her hometown.

     

    Article Link

    https://www.nytimes.com/2022/04/10/world/asia/ukraine-draft-dodgers.html

     

    1. richardmurray

      richardmurray

      The ‘messy middle’
      Ian Prasad Philbrick, The New York Times 
      Published: 20 Apr 2022 12:40 AM BdST Updated: 20 Apr 2022 12:40 AM BdST

      If you live in most any Western country, your government’s support for Ukraine, including sending weapons and imposing sanctions on Russia, can give the impression of a united global response to President Vladimir Putin’s invasion.

      But that isn’t the case. Most of the world’s 195 countries have not shipped aid to Ukraine or joined in sanctions. A handful have actively supported Russia. Far more occupy the “messy middle,” as Carisa Nietsche of the Centre for a New American Security calls it, taking neither Ukraine’s nor Russia’s side.

      “We live in a bubble, here in the US and Europe, where we think the very stark moral and geopolitical stakes, and framework of what we’re seeing unfolding, is a universal cause,” Barry Pavel, a senior vice president at the Atlantic Council, told me. “Actually, most of the governments of the world are not with us.”

      India and Israel are prominent democracies that ally with the United States on many issues, particularly security. But they rely on Russia for security as well and have avoided arming Ukraine or imposing sanctions on Moscow. “In both cases, the key factor isn’t ideology but national interests,” says my New York Times colleague Max Fisher, who has written about Russia’s invasion.

      India is the world’s largest buyer of Russian weapons, seeking to protect itself from Pakistan and China. India joined 34 other countries in abstaining from a United Nations vote that condemned Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. And India appears to be rebuffing Western pleas to take a harder line.

      Israel coordinates with Russia on Iran, its chief adversary, and in neighboring Syria (with which Russia has a strong relationship). Russian-speaking émigrés from the former Soviet Union also make up a sizable chunk of the Israeli electorate. Israel’s prime minister has avoided directly criticising Putin, and although its government has mediated between Ukraine and Russia, little has come out of the effort.

      Several Latin American, Southeast Asian and African countries have made similar choices. Bolivia, Vietnam and almost half of Africa’s 54 countries declined to support the UN resolution condemning Russia. Some rely on Russian military assistance, said Bruce Jones, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution. Others don’t want to risk jeopardising trade relations with China, which has parroted Russian propaganda about the war.

      Those countries “might be more accurately described as disinterested,” Fisher says, unwilling to risk their security or economies “for the sake of a struggle that they see as mostly irrelevant.”

      Some countries, citing the West’s history of imperialism and past failures to respect human rights, have justified opposing its response to Ukraine. South Africa’s president blamed NATO for Russia’s invasion, and its UN ambassador criticized the US invasion of Iraq during a debate last month about Ukraine’s humanitarian crisis.

      Other countries, including some that voted to condemn Russia’s invasion, accuse the West of acting counterproductively. Brazil’s UN ambassador has suggested that arming Ukraine and imposing sanctions on Russia risk escalating the war.

      “There’s nothing intellectually incoherent between viewing Russia’s actions as outrageous and not necessarily fully siding with the West’s reaction to it,” Jones told me.

      Autocratic leaders — including in the United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia and Nicaragua — may also feel threatened by Ukraine’s resistance and the West’s framing of the invasion as a struggle between democracy and authoritarianism, experts said. “They’re concerned that this could inspire opposition movements in their own countries,” Nietsche said.

      China, with all its economic and military might, has seen the war as a chance to enhance its own geopolitical standing as a counterweight to the United States while still maintaining ties to Russia. The countries recently issued a joint statement proclaiming a friendship with “no limits.” But China has struggled with the delicate balancing act of honoring that commitment without fully endorsing Russia’s invasion: Beijing has denounced Western sanctions but has not appeared to have given Russia weapons or economic aid.

      “China’s support for Russia, while very important, is also carefully hedged and measured,” Fisher says.

      Four countries — North Korea, Eritrea, Syria and Belarus — outright voted with Russia against the UN resolution condemning the invasion of Ukraine. Belarus is a former Soviet state whose autocratic leader asked Putin to help suppress protests in 2020 and allowed Russia to launch part of its invasion from within Belarus.

      Russia intervened in Syria’s civil war on behalf of the Moscow-aligned government there, and Syria is sending fighters who may aid Russian forces in Ukraine.

      It’s not unusual for countries to avoid picking sides on big global issues. Several stayed neutral during World War II; dozens sought to remain free of both United States and Soviet influence during the Cold War.

      But if the war in Ukraine drags on, Jones said, neutral countries could come under stronger international pressure to condemn Moscow. And for countries with close ties to Russia, even neutrality can be an act of courage.

    2. (See 1 other reply to this status update)

  21. Et Tu War
    My Thoughts To The Article Below

    The great Ali once asked, I paraphrase, why should I go fight vietkong for you when you my poser when I want a job, you my poser when I want rights, you my poser when I try to be happy.
    I recall in a documentary on Public Broadcasting Station concerning the Vietnam war a man who fought for Vietnam against the proxy government set up by the USA in vietnam, that he was the only person in his building to return from going to the war.
    What is the point? 
    Any government that has to force or ask people who live under it to fight for it proves that government is failed. 
    The reason why Black people had to be drafted is cause most Black people couldn't stand the USA and would never willingly take a bullet for a government that oppresses Black people. 
    To the article below, I have never lived in Ukraine or Russia. I know no one in Ukraine or Russia. The article below can be a complete lie. 

    But, if the article below has truth. 
    It makes three things clear. 
    The Ukrainian people are kin to Russian People. They are not distant. These two peoples are in the same way like the Union side the Confederacy.
    The Ukrainian government has forced Ukranian people, especially men: to deny themselves, to deny their personal relationships to Russia, to deny their right to choose.
    A segment of the Ukranian plus Russian people in the USA have a combined agenda that they promote which is telling a lie about the realities of this war, which the USA government supports for global order reasonings.

    Some may suggest I am stating a civil war. I am not. No war is ever civil and that includes the war between the states. I am stating the russian-ukranian war is an intracommunal war, a war within one community. Sequentially, while the Russian sector is the agressor plus the Ukrainian is the subjected. Neither side is absent the other. It is the same thing when Hindus side Muslims fight in India. It is the same with the people of Hong Kong or Taiwan aside the People of Mainland china. It is the same with the people of north korea side south korea. One community can have striking parts and still be one community. The people of ireland are still british even though they bombed everywhere possible in belfast or england they could.

    Now, why have I posted this in a Black communal online group. The question is how Black people see themselves under any government, but especially the USA. How many Black people if they had to choose will fight for the USA? I argue far less. Many Black people talk about enslaved forebears fighting to have the legal rights or communal equality to whites.  But I argue, for each enslaved forebear that wanted equality to all was ten forebears who wanted to merely break the skull of someone not black. 
    When Black people speak of anger or violence being a problem in the Black community, I hope anyone reading this will ask themselves, how many Black people are happy? And if unhappiness is merely a potential reality, not a sign that the mind is unhealthy, then the solution to unhappiness isn't some pharmaceutical product or some talk with someone saying to another they are wrong, but an process that leads to what will make a Black person happy.

    Last question, when the war between ukraine side russia is over, will Ukraine have to give up the weapons they were given by various countries? 

     

    now1.png

    Photo description

    Volodymyr Danuliv, a Ukrainian evacuee, at a center for asylum seekers and refugees in Chisinau, Moldova’s capital. He has relatives in the Russian Army and is determined not to join the fight for Ukraine.

     

    Article

     

    Ukraine’s Draft Dodgers Face Guilt, Shame and Reproach

    April 10, 2022, 1:57 p.m. ETApril 10, 2022
    April 10, 2022
    Jeffrey Gettleman and Monika Pronczuk

    CHISINAU, Moldova – Vova Klever, a young, successful fashion photographer from Ukraine’s capital, Kyiv, did not see himself in this war.

    “Violence is not my weapon,” he said.

    So shortly after Russia invaded Ukraine in late February and Ukraine prohibited men of military age from leaving the country, Mr. Klever sneaked out to London.

    His mistake, which would bring devastating consequences, was writing to a friend about it.

    The friend and his wife then shared the contents of that conversation on social media. It sparked an online fight that went viral, and Ukrainians all over the internet exploded with anger and resentment.

    “You are a walking dead person,” one Twitter message said. “I’m going to find you in any corner in the world.”

    The notion of people — especially men — leaving war-torn Ukraine for safe and comfortable lives abroad has provoked a moral dilemma among Ukrainians that turns on one of the most elemental decisions humans can make: fight or flee.

    Thousands of Ukrainian men of military age have left the country to avoid participating in the war, according to records from regional law enforcement officials and interviews with people inside and outside Ukraine. Smuggling rings in Moldova, and possibly other European countries, have been doing a brisk business. Some people have paid up to $15,000 for a secret night-time ride out of Ukraine, Moldovan officials said.

    The draft dodgers are the vast exception. That makes it all the more complicated for them — morally, socially and practically. Ukrainian society has been mobilized for war against a much bigger enemy, and countless Ukrainians without military experience have volunteered for the fight. To maximize its forces, the Ukrainian government has taken the extreme step of prohibiting men 18 to 60 from leaving, with few exceptions.

    All this has forced many Ukrainian men who don’t want to serve into taking illegal routes into Hungary, Moldova and Poland and other neighboring countries. Even among those convinced they fled for the right reasons, some said they felt guilty and ashamed.

    “I don’t think I can be a good soldier right now in this war,” said a Ukrainian computer programmer named Volodymyr, who left shortly after the war began and did not want to disclose his last name, fearing repercussions for avoiding military service.

    “Look at me,” Volodymyr said, as he sat in a pub in Warsaw drinking a beer. “I wear glasses. I am 46. I don’t look like a classic fighter, some Rambo who can fight Russian troops.”

    He took another sip and stared into his glass.

    “Yes, I am ashamed,” he said. “I ran away from this war, and it is probably my crime.”

    Ukrainian politicians have threatened to put draft dodgers in prison and confiscate their homes. But within Ukrainian society, even as cities continue to be pummeled by Russian bombs, the sentiments are more divided.

    A meme recently popped up with the refrain, “Do what you can, where you are.” It’s clearly meant to counter negative feelings toward those who left and assure them they can still contribute to the war effort. And Ukrainian women and children, the vast majority of the refugees, face little backlash.

    But that’s not the case for young men, and this is what blew up on the young photographer.

    In mid-March, Olga Lepina, a modeling agent, said Mr. Klever disclosed in a text message to her husband that he had paid $5,000 to be smuggled out of Ukraine, and from earlier conversations she knew he had wanted to go to London.

    Ms. Lepina said she and Mr. Klever had been friends for years. She even went to his wedding. But as the war drew near, she said, Mr. Klever became intensely patriotic and anti-Russian, and said rude things to her husband, who is Russian. When she found out he had avoided service, she was so outraged that she posted on Instagram the comments Mr. Klever made insulting her husband, and said he had spent $5,000 to be smuggled out of Ukraine.

    “For me, it was a hypocrisy to leave the country and pay money for this,” she explained, adding, “He needs to be responsible for his words.”

    Mr. Klever, who is in his 20s, fell deeper into an online spat with Ms. Lepina. She and others said he had made insensitive comments about the town of Bucha, the site of major violence and the town she was from. (The comments were made before the atrocities in Bucha were revealed). Mr. Klever was then bombarded with death threats. Some Ukrainians also resented that he used his wealth to get out and called it “cheating.”

    Responding to emailed questions, Mr. Klever did not deny skipping out on his service and said that he had poor eyesight and had “been through a lot lately."

    “You can’t even imagine the hatred,” he said.

    Mr. Klever gave conflicting accounts of how exactly he exited the country and declined to provide details. But for many other Ukrainian men, Moldova has become the favorite trap door.

    Moldova shares a nearly 800-mile border with western Ukraine. And unlike Hungary, Poland, Romania and Slovakia, Moldova is not part of the European Union, which means it has significantly fewer resources to control its frontiers. It is one of Europe’s poorest countries and has been a hub of human trafficking and organized crime.

    Within days of the war erupting, Moldovan officials said, Moldovan gangs posted advertisements on Telegram, a popular messaging service in Eastern Europe, offering to arrange cars, even minibuses, to spirit out draft dodgers.

    Law enforcement officials said the typical method was for the smugglers and the Ukrainians to select a rendezvous point along Moldova’s “green border,” the term used for the unfenced border areas, and meet late at night.

    On a recent night, a squad of Moldovan border guards trudged across a flat, endless wheat field, their boots sinking in the mud, looking for draft dodgers. There was no border post on the horizon, just the faint lights of a Ukrainian village and the sounds of dogs barking in the darkness.

    Out here, one can just walk into and out of Ukraine.

    Moldovan officials said that since late February they had broken up more than 20 smuggling rings, including a few well-known criminal enterprises. In turn, they have apprehended 1,091 people crossing the border illegally. Officials said all were Ukrainian men.

    Once caught, these men have a choice. If they don’t want to be sent back, they can apply for asylum in Moldova, and cannot be deported.

    But if they do not apply for asylum, they can be turned over to the Ukrainian authorities, who, Moldovan officials said, have been pressuring them to send the men back. The vast majority of those who entered illegally, around 1,000, have sought asylum, and fewer than 100 have been returned, Moldovan officials said. Two thousand other Ukrainian men who have entered Moldova legally have also applied for asylum.

    Volodymyr Danuliv is one of them. He refuses to fight in the war, though it’s not the prospect of dying that worries him, he said. It is the killing.

    “I can’t shoot Russian people,” said Mr. Danuliv, 50.

    He explained that his siblings had married Russians and that two of his nephews were serving in the Russian Army — in Ukraine.

    “How can I fight in this war?” he asked. “I might kill my own family.”

    Myroslav Hai, an official with Ukraine’s military reserve, conceded, “There are people who evade mobilization, but their share in comparison with volunteers is not so large.” Other Ukrainian officials said men ideologically or religiously opposed to war could serve in another way, for example as cooks or drivers.

    But none of the more than a dozen men interviewed for this article seemed interested. Mr. Danuliv, a businessman from western Ukraine, said he wanted no part in the war. When asked if he feared being ostracized or shamed, he shook his head.

    “I didn’t kill anyone. That’s what’s important to me,” he said. “I don’t care what people say.”

    What happens when the war ends? How much resentment will surface toward those who left? These are questions Ukrainians, men and women, are beginning to ask.

    When Ms. Lepina shamed Mr. Klever, she was no longer in Ukraine herself. She had left, too, for France, with her husband. Every day, she said, she wrestles with guilt.

    “People are suffering in Ukraine, and I want to be there to help them, to support them,” she said. “But at the same time I’m safe and I want to be here.”

    “It’s a very ambiguous, complicated feeling,” she said.

    And she knows she will be judged.

    “Of course there will be some people who divide Ukrainian nationals between those who left and those who stayed,” she said. “I am ready for that.”

    Siergiej Greczuszkin contributed reporting from Warsaw, and Daria Mychkovska from Przemysl, Poland.

    Correction: April 10, 2022
    An earlier version of this article referred incompletely to the online dispute between Vova Klever and Olga Lupina. In addition to writing a social media post describing Mr. Klever’s avoidance of military service in Ukraine, Ms. Lupina also posted comments she considered insensitive that he made about her husband’s Russian heritage and about Bucha, her hometown.

     

    Article Link

    https://www.nytimes.com/2022/04/10/world/asia/ukraine-draft-dodgers.html

     

    1. richardmurray

      richardmurray

      COMMENTS

       

      @ProfD the following link will take you to an article where you will note many ukranians dissenting. If anything your prose prove that black people take too much stock in how white owned media presents us. Black people in the usa don't own white owned media but live in a white country.

      https://aalbc.com/tc/profile/6477-richardmurray/?status=1883&type=status

      @Troy I will be blunt, many a black person I know older than you or me by distance said the same thing about their time when our age, referencing a book written by a black person. .... What do you want Troy for the Black community in the USA? Do you want Black owned book publishing firms to dominate the market? what goal do you want for the black community in the USA? 

       

      https://aalbc.com/tc/topic/9211-the-black-community-in-the-usa-need-an-alternative-to-black-officials-from-the-party-of-andrew-jackson-or-abraham-lincoln/?do=findComment&comment=51995

       

      @ProfDI want to amend your statement, not just russian counterparts their russian kin/family/clan. That article's primary point , in my view, is the lack of comprehension or media admittance on the relationship between ukraine side russia. 

       

      I bet most ukranians have russian ancestry. You think so professor? I think so. This russian/ukranian war is a intra-clan war. That is being sold as two separate peoples, by the usa goverment who has an agenda to offer other news than the fiscal downturns or virus and wants to push the european union into something. 

       

      of course, most people from the USA who didn't fight in the vietnam war,living in canada or somewhere outside the usa, who are alive still feel a similar guilt or shame to ukranians who have not fought in the russian ukranian war. Same to whites who didn't fight in the war between the states, based on what was spoken through transcription in my memory.  Humanity loves to make men feel bad when they don't fight in wars, as if wars are ever as straight or simple as advertised. They never are.  

       

      In my view, the russian ukranian was is inevitable or necessary. I will defend my position professor, with the following, i wonder how my defense holds up.

      1st. the russian government was already installed in two regions in ukraine that the current ukranian government never officially accepted. The eastern border provinces of ukraine that border russia, I think called the donks. And Crimea was under russian suzerainty, like guantanemo is to the usa. So, the russian government saw a need to control crimea which is the biggest seaport in the region and support plus liberate the donks, which is the pro russian , east section of ukraine. Based on the western kiev based ukranina reply to current events, russia acted in fair necessity. 

      2nd. The ukranian goverment before the current was pro russian and the usa side other western european countries, manipulated things in ukraine to overtunr said government. Thus, the usa meddled in ukraine to place a pro usa government. But the pro usa government in ukraine didn't seem to realize that all their neighbors had a military alliance but them. bellarus has a military alliance with russia, poland and west of ukraine are all in nato for the most part. so...the ukrainian government foolishly thought it could evade being a proper neutral country while not joining a military alliance. they performed a dangerous dance between two powers and any time a government does that they make war in their land inevitable. 

       

      @Stefan for the record, the black party of governance in the usa isn't my agenda. I want to see it, I advocate for it, but on a simple grounds, it has never been done. 

      Black people starting business, supporting black businesses, going to college, having educational pushes gardless of college in the usa have been done multiple times ias collective pushes in the black community in the usa. But the black community in the usa has never , ever , had a black party of governance. I advocate doing new things when you have tried the same old things multiple times. 

      Black people i know in south africa, tell me about, voting, and I inform them. over 95% of black people voted for mandela and company, and in the first eight years, over 90% of black people participated in voting. The fact that the percentage of black vote is lower now can't be blamed on black voters when in my lifetime black people voted over 90% in south africa. I tell them, do new things, forget about black parties of governance, ala ANC forget them. 

      To the usa, I have never been a member of the donkeys or the elephants and I have no intention of joining a black party of governance in the usa , but I know it is something that hasn't been done and so instead of hearing ten more years of black people complain about the party of andrew jackson or abaraham lincoln, i advocate those complainers making a new party. 

      You know the forums in this community, you read the comments, this forum is full of black folk, at the least people I think are black,  complaining  about the two parties, so leave both of them and start a new one. 

       

      To your point about soliciting information from others , fair enough

       

      @Troy   for men of the sun, that may be the hardest achievement for our rocks to make 

      as you said, the individualism has to go... the day most black individuals have an idea of where they want the black community to go, will be the day , communalism is stronger in the black community

       

      https://aalbc.com/tc/topic/9211-the-black-community-in-the-usa-need-an-alternative-to-black-officials-from-the-party-of-andrew-jackson-or-abraham-lincoln/?do=findComment&comment=52028

       

      @ProfD is power for nothing? is the path made from power unnecessary? I argue the history of the USA , at the least the white european people in it, proves using violence/war/getting the death of millions/being barbaric/having greed is for everything, not for nothing. Without said negativities the white european community in the usa has little to nothing of what they have, thus said negativities are the most necessary to those who have the most. If anything, the questions are, what value is peace? is peace for nothing?  Is peace unnecessary? Are native americans living peacefully in the USA necessary to native american betterment , growth? What has living peacefully brought the native american? 

      I think whites know history very well, and they know that those who are in control have the forebears who acted negatively without shame, for they comprehended their descendants will be better off inheriting more, by any means, not less. 

      https://aalbc.com/tc/topic/9211-the-black-community-in-the-usa-need-an-alternative-to-black-officials-from-the-party-of-andrew-jackson-or-abraham-lincoln/?do=findComment&comment=52030

       

    2. (See 1 other reply to this status update)

  22. now1.jpg

    I don't know if Frank James was the shooter in the subway, but if he was, he offers an interesting query challenge.

    NYC's black community always had black people in it, who love to suggest a usage of violence is incorrect. The reason why is complicated, it isn't merely about right or wrong. But, one of the juxtaposes between white controlled media of nyc /the black church in the black community of NYC/black employed class in NYC is the idea of gun violence in the Black community as something of youth. The narrative is, the youth must get the violence out of them. But, Frank James is sixty something years old. Frank James was an elder teen in the 1970s. So Frank James is not a Black person who is without a decades long look at the Black community in NYC, in NYS, in the USA and with that a high potential for a very honest while negative appraisal of many things in this area. 

    Many will suggest mental imbalance, as in NYC that is suggested for anyone who is violent. From white media to many or most black homes in NYC, mental dysfunction or imbalance is always the reason behind any violence as if, being violent can not be from a mentally sane person, which of course is a lie. 
     

    A FORUM POST

     

    1. richardmurray

      richardmurray

      @Stefan 

      thank you for enjoying my posts. Well, I don't speak of my plans cause speaking of plans online is dysfunctional at the least. 

      I am glad you offered your opinion and I expect to read no more opinions from you on this topic. 

      I stay true to my position. Frank James is a symbol of a truth that many black people or people in general want to ignore or sidestep. And said truth is the relationship of many people to the USA who live in it, which I think, and I daresay I know,  is far more negative than most want to admit, and the answer isn't mental healthcare. 

    2. (See 8 other replies to this status update)

  23. now1.jpg

    I don't know if Frank James was the shooter in the subway, but if he was, he offers an interesting query challenge.

    NYC's black community always had black people in it, who love to suggest a usage of violence is incorrect. The reason why is complicated, it isn't merely about right or wrong. But, one of the juxtaposes between white controlled media of nyc /the black church in the black community of NYC/black employed class in NYC is the idea of gun violence in the Black community as something of youth. The narrative is, the youth must get the violence out of them. But, Frank James is sixty something years old. Frank James was an elder teen in the 1970s. So Frank James is not a Black person who is without a decades long look at the Black community in NYC, in NYS, in the USA and with that a high potential for a very honest while negative appraisal of many things in this area. 

    Many will suggest mental imbalance, as in NYC that is suggested for anyone who is violent. From white media to many or most black homes in NYC, mental dysfunction or imbalance is always the reason behind any violence as if, being violent can not be from a mentally sane person, which of course is a lie. 
     

    A FORUM POST

     

    1. richardmurray

      richardmurray

      @Stefan yeah and when frank james was 34 he was unhappy, when he was 15 he was unhappy. I think like many people in this country, starting with the native american, while including black, white, male, female, and many in all the racial groups, this country is not a nice place to live in. But with so many people always coming in , talking about how awful the country they left is, although they never admit the country they left was made awful by the country their going to, the USA always has enough people to continually speak the lies that this country has always emitted. Where do you go when you live in the usa but you are fed up with the USA? When you live in china /russia/nigeria/colombia and you are fed up, you go to the usa, but when you are fed up with the usa, where do you go? Where could Frank James go to find happiness that he clearly didn't get in the USA

    2. (See 8 other replies to this status update)

  24. now1.jpg

    Why You Should Consider a University Press for Your Book
    Updated: April 5, 2022
    First Published: April 5, 2022 by Adam Rosen < https://www.janefriedman.com/author/adam-rosen/ >  

    Today’s guest post is by Adam Rosen (@adammmmmrosen).

     

    For many authors, there’s a certain template for book publishing “success”: signing with an agent, getting a decent advance, and watching the awards and social media followers roll in. Achieving this fantasy, as you no doubt know, is famously challenging—and arguably getting more so every year as Big Publishing continues to consolidate (to say nothing of recent employee turmoil).

    While it’s an oversimplification to declare that the big houses stake too much on celebrity memoirs, former Trump staffer tell-alls, IPs, and other supposed sure bets, there’s more than a kernel of truth here. Platform and brand arguably matter now more than ever, especially when it comes to nonfiction.

    Despair not, though. If you have a small platform and a big idea (and strong writing skills), there are other options. Enter the humble, often overlooked university press.

    Within the past few years university presses have been publishing some of the most exciting, critically acclaimed trade books around. Last year, for instance, three out of the ten books longlisted for a National Book Award for Nonfiction were published by university presses. West Virginia University Press, which puts out 18 to 20 books a year and is the state of West Virginia’s only book publisher, has earned the sort of recognition and media attention you’d typically expect from a hip new indie press or house ten times its size. In 2020, Deesha Philyaw’s The Secret Lives of Church Ladies, a short story collection published by the four-person WVUP staff (now five), was named a finalist for the National Book Award for Fiction and earned a PEN/Faulkner Award, among several other prestigious accolades; last October it was announced that a TV adaptation of the book was in the works for HBO Max. The next month, Ghosts of New York by Jim Lewis, another West Virginia release, made the New York Times list of 100 Notable Books of 2021.

    University presses have carved out a unique place in the trade publishing landscape, says Kristen Elias Rowley, editor in chief of Ohio State University Press, by providing an opportunity for “books that can’t find a home elsewhere.” This often translates to “projects that are either pushing boundaries in terms of form or content or voice. Projects that a larger press is going to say, ‘You know, we can’t sell 50,000 copies of this, so we’re not going to do it’ or ‘We don’t think this is mainstream enough.’” She points to two upcoming titles on OSUP’s catalog, cultural critic Negesti Kaudo’s collection of personal essays, Ripe (a Lit Hub Most Anticipated Book of 2022), and Finding Querencia: Essays from In-Between by Harrison Candelaria Fletcher, as examples. Both collections will be released through OSUP’s trade imprint, Mad Creek, this month.

    Elias Rowley estimates that at least half of all university presses publish books by non-academics. While the core mandate of UPs is to advance scholarship through journals and scholarly monographs, they also have a mission to “put important literary or other general public or regional works out into the world,” she says. Of the 40 to 60 books a year OSUP publishes, roughly a dozen are trade books released through Mad Creek.

    “It never seemed like the point was to be insular,” says Derek Krissoff, director of West Virginia University Press. “Part of the value proposition for [UPs] is building bridges that go out to other communities” beyond the confines of academia. In Krissoff’s view, this larger purpose gives university presses leeway to make decisions that are less commercially driven. “We’re very concerned about being thoughtful stewards of people’s resources, because we are part of the state of West Virginia. But we don’t have shareholders who need to be rewarded, and we can be a little bit freer in terms of what we choose to invest in,” says Krissoff. In light of WVU’s recent wave of success, this (winning) strategy feels more than a little ironic.

    The backbone of many university presses’ trade programs is probably familiar: local and regional history, cookbooks, photography books, and other sorts of consumer-friendly titles with an obvious connection to the area or university. But many also offer a home for books that are niche, experimental, challenging in various ways, and/or just kind of weird.

    I’d like to think of my own as an example of the latter. In February 2018 I put the finishing touches on my proposal: a collection of essays, from various contributors, on the cult film The Room, widely considered “the worst movie of all time” and a personal obsession of mine. My prototype was the Indiana University Press series The Year’s Work: Studies in Fan Culture and Cultural Theory, a heady series devoted to dissecting pop culture bric-a-brac. Its topics of focus ranged from the straightforward (The Worlds of John Wick) to the strange (Household Horror: Cinematic Fear and the Secret Life of Everyday Objects).

    I discovered the series after coming across a 2009 entrant, The Year’s Work in Lebowski Studies, a deconstruction of, you guessed it, The Big Lebowski. The essay collection felt revelatory, offering enlightening historical and critical analysis that helped less-savvy viewers (such as myself) uncover the layers upon layers of meaning in the film, whether related to the Gulf War, the failures of the New Left, or the influence of literary critic Paul de Man on the Coen brothers (and, of course, nihilists and white Russians). It was often hilarious, but it took its subject matter seriously. For its efforts it snagged reviews in the New York Times and Washington Post.

    A few of the agents I submitted my proposal to told me they liked my idea but the scope felt too narrow; one suggested I expand the focus to bad films in general. Alternatively, it was too academic. The bottom line was that they didn’t think they could sell it in its current form.

    After several dozen rejections, I changed tacks and started submitting directly to university presses, who I knew were open to unsolicited queries and proposals. This time the feedback was more encouraging, but I still ran into the same problem, just from a different side: several editors said they liked my idea, but it felt too trade-y—they wouldn’t know how to sell it.

    The sweet spot, it turned it out, was with an academic press with a strong trade arm who published on pop culture: Indiana University Press, i.e., the publisher who put out the very book I was meticulously, and possibly shamelessly, modeling my own book on. I ended up exactly where I began. 

    Initially I was a bit surprised that they’d have me. I have a BA in political science, and while as a freelance writer I’ve written about pop culture (including a piece on The Room), I don’t have a film beat. And yet, four years later, I’m the editor of and contributor to a collection of essays about a film, a book whose vast majority of contributors are academics. Another, related data point: an author whose book proposal and sample chapters I recently edited has received an encouraging amount of initial interest from her first-choice publisher, a university press in her geographic area, despite not having a bachelor’s. But she does have excellent research skills and deep professional expertise in a field related to the topic of her book, an iconic bridge.

    All of which is to say that (a) university presses are not just for scholars; and (b) many are far more open-minded than you may think—as I once thought.

    If you are interested in submitting to a university press, Elias Rowley and Krissoff have a few suggestions. Given the unique focus areas and track record of each press, any place you contact should be a good match for your topic. Proposing a book about birding in Maine probably isn’t a great fit for, say, University of Nevada Press. That said, “fit” can be expansive, thematic as much as geographic. “I think what our books have in common is that they are grounded in place,” says Krissoff. “And it doesn’t always mean they’re grounded in our place, although a lot of our books are about Appalachia or about Appalachian topics.”

    While having a decent platform doesn’t hurt, says Krissoff, it’s not necessary; he says he doesn’t look for an author’s metrics when he’s reviewing a project. If he likes their idea, it’s much more important that the author is willing to truly commit to the writing, revising, and marketing processes. “Platform is always a bonus and can really make a difference in the outcome for a book, but it’s not going to be the thing that makes me decide not to do a project,” says Elias Rowley. “I’m not looking for a bare minimum of certain kinds of requirements. I’m looking for [if] this is a book that should be out there in the world.”

    To that end, Elias Rowley says that it’s rarely too early to get on an editor’s radar. She advises authors to reach out and connect with editors early on, whether it’s through email or in-person events like the Association of Writers & Writing Programs (AWP) conference. She’ll even respond to queries that are submitted before the proposal’s been written. This way, if she likes an idea and thinks it might be a good fit, she can help develop it from the beginning. “We’re interested in forging those relationships and having it be a collaborative partnership,” she says.

    The downsides? University presses typically don’t offer an advance, and if they do, it’s probably going to be pretty modest. That said, if your book sells well, you earn royalties immediately, since you don’t need to “earn out.” As Belt publisher Anne Trubek puts it, “Advances are royalties. They just come sooner.” It’s also expected that authors supply their own index, which means either using software to do a bad job or hiring someone to make one (what I did). I also gave each essay contributor an honorarium.

    So when my book publishes this October, technically I’ll already be in the hole. Will I sell enough books to break even? Hard to say. I do think it could be a strong backlist contender. As I argue in my book, The Room has become The Rocky Horror Picture Show for the millennial generation. There are (or were, before Covid) monthly Saturday night screenings of it around the world, each replete with a set of established viewing rituals. The film’s notoriety continues to grow alongside that of its eccentric creator, Tommy Wiseau. But this may be wishful thinking.

    On the other hand, I already consider my journey a success. Having a book title under my name with a well-respected university press has brought me a level of professional prestige, boosting my credibility as freelance book editor and opening doors for various writing projects. I also have the satisfaction of having taken the germ of an idea, turned it into a proposal, wrangled together 16 smart (and, blessedly, easy to work with) contributors, and executed the entire thing into the form of a book I will eventually hold in my hands. And, certainly last but not least, I’d like to think I’ve played a small part in furthering the world’s knowledge of the worst movie of all time, which surely counts for something.

    It’s not the typical publishing success template, much less a show on HBO Max. But it just may be good enough.

    IN AMENDMENT

    Why Your Amazing Writing Group Might Be Failing You
    https://www.janefriedman.com/why-your-amazing-writing-group-might-be-failing-you/


     

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