6 Books Published by McFarland on Our Site — Book Cover Mosaic

Click for more detail about Rear Admiral Larry Chambers, USN: First African American to Command an Aircraft Carrier by Ric Murphy Rear Admiral Larry Chambers, USN: First African American to Command an Aircraft Carrier

by Ric Murphy
McFarland (Dec 01, 2017)
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The first African-American aircraft carrier commander, Rear Admiral Lawrence Cleveland Chambers (1929- ) played a prominent role as captain of the USS Midway during the Vietnam War. During the evacuation of Saigon—known as Operation Frequent Wind—he famously ordered several UH-1 helicopters pushed overboard to make room for an escaping South Vietnamese Air Force major to land his Cessna. Chambers, who had only commanded Midway for a few weeks, gave the order believing (wrongly) that he would be court-martialed for the $10 million loss. This biography covers his early life and military career, including his role in the desegregation of the U.S. Navy during a period racial strife.


Click for more detail about Black Politics After The Civil Rights Movement: Activity And Beliefs In Sacramento, 1970-2000 by David Covin Black Politics After The Civil Rights Movement: Activity And Beliefs In Sacramento, 1970-2000

by David Covin
McFarland (May 13, 2009)
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This important study posits a new way of understanding how ordinary Black people used the 30 years following the civil rights movement to forge a new political reality for themselves and their country. While following national trends closely, it focuses particularly on the political environment of Sacramento, California, from 1970 to 2000. Having a racial profile that is remarkably similar to the nation’s demographics as a whole, Sacramento serves as a useful national proxy on the racial question. Unlike most studies of Black politics over the era, this text pays close attention to minor actors in the political process, yet places them within the context of the larger political world. We see, for example, the local effects of the War on Poverty, the Harold Washington mayoral campaigns, the Rainbow Coalition, the Million Man March, and the great increases in locally appointed and elected Black officials within the context of similar campaigns and movements nationwide.


Click for more detail about Gayl Jones: The Language Of Voice And Freedom In Her Writings by Casey Clabough Gayl Jones: The Language Of Voice And Freedom In Her Writings

by Casey Clabough
McFarland (Aug 15, 2008)
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Gayl Jones is dedicated to the art of "verbal authenticity," stemming from her identification with her African American heritage. Amid widespread critical praise as well as pointed attacks for her controversial first two novels, Jones has shown a constantly evolving cultural consciousness.

This first single-author study of Gayl Jones recovers the work of an under-examined yet immensely skillful contemporary writer. It offers a thorough examination of her technical innovations as well as her willingness to explore controversial subject matter.

The book addresses such crucial themes as Afrocentrism, diasporas, mythopoesis, post-colonialism and globalization, and offers close readings of the aesthetic and political interchanges within Jones’s fiction, drama, poetry, and criticism. Two interviews with Gayl Jones are included.


Click for more detail about Unified Black Movement In Brazil, 1978-2002 by David Covin Unified Black Movement In Brazil, 1978-2002

by David Covin
McFarland (Aug 22, 2006)
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Brazil in the late 1970s was a country of racial tension and inequality. During this time, a number of independent Black organizations sprang up from older roots, giving the black population a place to create, develop and share narratives about life in Brazil. Within these organizations, they developed a sense of racial consciousness that gave rise to the Movimento Negro Unificado (MNU) in 1979. The MNU, or Unified Black Movement, created an outlet for racial grievances and gave a voice to those previously unheard. This intensive historical study of Brazil’s Movimento Negro Unificado centers on the political effects and ramifications of the group. In order to present a complete picture of the MNU, it looks at the organization within four separate contexts: international, national, historical and human. Through this approach, the MNU is examined in relation to the African Diaspora, the European colonization of the Americas, the Atlantic Slave Trade, and the development of Brazil as an independent state. From a national perspective, the MNU is viewed amid other social organizations and cultural expressions. The result is a detailed study that admits the organization’s shortcomings but assesses them contextually, providing a more complete and nuanced understanding of the significance of the MNU’s problems and achievements. Appendices offer additional information such as the MNU Letter of Principles, the Constitution of the MNU, the preamble to the MNU Action Program and the MNU Hymn. A glossary is also included.


Click for more detail about Dudley Randall, Broadside Press, And The Black Arts Movement In Detroit, 1960-1995 by Julius E. Thompson Dudley Randall, Broadside Press, And The Black Arts Movement In Detroit, 1960-1995

by Julius E. Thompson
McFarland (Feb 01, 2005)
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In 1965 Dudley F. Randall founded the Broadside Press, a company devoted to publishing, distributing and promoting the works of black poets and writers. In so doing, he became a major player in the civil rights movement. Hundreds of black writers were given an outlet for their work and for their calls for equality and black identity. Though Broadside was established on a minimal budget, Randall’s unique skills made the press successful. He was trained as a librarian and had spent decades studying and writing poetry; most importantly, Randall was totally committed to the advancement of black literature. The famous and relatively unknown sought out Broadside, including such writers as Gwendolyn Brooks, Margaret Walker, Mae Jackson, Lance Jeffers, Etheridge Knight, Sonia Sanchez, Nikki Giovanni, Audre Lorde and Sterling D. Plumpp. His story is one of battling to promote black identity and equality through literature, and thus lifting the cultural lives of all Americans.

More about the Black Art’s Movement


Click for more detail about Watergate’s Forgotten Hero by Adam Henig Watergate’s Forgotten Hero

by Adam Henig
McFarland (Jan 01, 1970)
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“Absorbing…compelling biography.”—Herb Boyd, author of Baldwin’s Harlem: A Biography of James Baldwin

Jet Magzine Cover of Frank Wills Nearly everyone who played a significant role in the Watergate saga has been scrutinized except one key participant: night watchman Frank Wills. On the evening of June 17, 1972, in Washington DC, the twenty-four year-old security guard was on duty at the Watergate Office Building when he detected a break-in. A high school dropout with few hours of formal guard training, Wills alerted the police who caught five burglars, ultimately igniting a national political scandal that ended in the resignation of President Richard Nixon.

The only African American identified with the Watergate affair, Frank Wills enjoyed a brief moment in the limelight, but was unable to cope with his newfound fame, living the remainder of his life in obscurity and poverty. Through exhaustive research and numerous interviews, the story of America’s most famous night watchman finally has been told.