7 Books Published by Lexington Books on Our Site — Book Cover Mosaic

Click for more detail about Lucile H. Bluford and the Kansas City Call: Activist Voice for Social Justice by Sheila Brooks and Clint C. Wilson II Lucile H. Bluford and the Kansas City Call: Activist Voice for Social Justice

by Sheila Brooks and Clint C. Wilson II
Lexington Books (Apr 13, 2018)
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This book examines the journalism of editor and publisher Lucile H. Bluford. Focusing on selections from her writing in the Kansas City Call from 1968 to 1983, it explores how she articulated a Black feminist standpoint and exposed injustices faced by African Americans and women that were otherwise ignored by mainstream media.


Click for more detail about Reading Contemporary African American Literature by Beauty Bragg Reading Contemporary African American Literature

by Beauty Bragg
Lexington Books (Jun 07, 2016)
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“Bragg’s new study [Reading Contemporary African American Literature: Black Women’s Popular Fiction, Post-Civil Rights Experience, and the African American Canon] offers support for those wishing to re-examine the incorporation of popular fiction in their classrooms or scholarship. This new analysis of popular fiction places popular fiction alongside historical writing movements, offers feminist approaches to understanding the goals of black women authors’ fiction, and gives scholars a new foundation to build upon. Popular fiction is needed in the classroom and the canon, and would be a welcome addition to scholarly studies. Those interested and working with, or even considering, popular fiction should pick this study up as a framework for analysis.”
English: Journal of the English Association


Click for more detail about The Fluid Boundaries of Suffrage and Jim Crow: Staking Claims in the American Heartland by Damaris B. Hill The Fluid Boundaries of Suffrage and Jim Crow: Staking Claims in the American Heartland

by Damaris B. Hill
Lexington Books (Jun 03, 2016)
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The essays in this collection examine instances of racial and gender oppression in the American heartland in the twentieth century and directly engage with the ways in which race, gender, and intersectional identities are remembered, expressed, and contextualized.


Click for more detail about Afrofuturism 2.0: The Rise of Astro-Blackness by Reynaldo Anderson and Charles E. Jones Afrofuturism 2.0: The Rise of Astro-Blackness

by Reynaldo Anderson and Charles E. Jones
Lexington Books (Dec 16, 2015)
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The ideas and practices related to afrofuturism have existed for most of the 20th century, especially in the north American African diaspora community. After Mark Dery coined the word "afrofuturism" in 1993, Alondra Nelson as a member of an online forum, along with other participants, began to explore the initial terrain and intellectual underpinnings of the concept noting that “AfroFuturism has emerged as a term of convenience to describe analysis, criticism and cultural production that addresses the intersections between race and technology.” Afrofuturism 2.0: The Rise of Astroblackness represents a transition from previous ideas related to afrofuturism that were formed in the late 20th century around issues of the digital divide, music and literature. Afrofuturism 2.0 expands and broadens the discussion around the concept to include religion, architecture, communications, visual art, philosophy and reflects its current growth as an emerging global Pan African creative phenomenon.


Click for more detail about Facing South to Africa: Toward an Afrocentric Critical Orientation (Critical Africana Studies) by Molefi Kete Asante Facing South to Africa: Toward an Afrocentric Critical Orientation (Critical Africana Studies)

by Molefi Kete Asante
Lexington Books (Aug 20, 2014)
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Facing South to Africa is a bold synthesis of the ideas that have made Afrocentric theorists the leading voices of the African renaissance. Written from the vantage point of the philosophical and political discourse that emerged over the past twenty-five years, this is a highly readable and accessible introduction to African social and cultural criticism. Molefi Kete Asante engages in the practice of critical thinking by raising fundamental questions about how Africans view themselves and the world. Tackling the themes of culture, education, social sciences, the university, politics, African unity, and the prospects for peace in Africa, Facing South to Africa is a fresh, daring, and popularizing synthesis of the best critical thought on the issues of modern knowledge. Asante’s plan is to reorient our thinking on Africa by asking questions of Africa and Africans rather than imposing preconceived, external ideas on African issues.


Click for more detail about Freedom’s Journal: The First African-American Newspaper by Jacqueline Bacon Freedom’s Journal: The First African-American Newspaper

by Jacqueline Bacon
Lexington Books (Feb 09, 2007)
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On March 16, 1827, Freedom’s Journal, the first African-American newspaper, began publication in New York. Freedom’s Journal was a forum edited and controlled by African Americans in which they could articulate their concerns. National in scope and distributed in several countries, the paper connected African Americans beyond the boundaries of city or region and engaged international issues from their perspective. It ceased publication after only two years, but shaped the activism of both African-American and white leaders for generations to come.

A comprehensive examination of this groundbreaking periodical, Freedom’s Journal: The First African-American Newspaper is a much-needed contribution to the literature. Despite its significance, it has not been investigated comprehensively. This study examines all aspects of the publication as well as extracts historical information from the content.

Related Information

The Nation’s Black Owned Independent Newspapers

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Click for more detail about Poverty & Race In America: The Emerging Agendas by Chester Hartman Poverty & Race In America: The Emerging Agendas

by Chester Hartman
Lexington Books (Mar 02, 2006)
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Collected in this volume are the best articles and symposia from Poverty & Race, the bimonthly newsletter journal of The Poverty & Race Research Action Council (PRRAC), a Washington, DC-based national public interest organization founded in 1990. Poverty & Race in America includes over six-dozen works originally published between mid-2001 and 2005, many of which have been updated and revised. The contributors represent the best of progressive thought and activism on America’s two most salient, and seemingly intractable, domestic problems-race and poverty. Divided into topical sections, this volume considers the issues of race, poverty, housing, education, health, and democracy. Poverty & Race in America is especially concerned with the links between and among these areas, both for purposes of analysis and policy prescriptions. Featuring a foreword by Congressman Jesse L. Jackson, Jr., this edited collection will be of great interest to policy makers and human rights activists and hopefully stimulate creative thought and action to bring an end to racism and poverty.