8 Books Published by University of Missouri on Our Site — Book Cover Mosaic

Click for more detail about Gospel Plays, Operas, and Later Dramatic Works by Langston Hughes Gospel Plays, Operas, and Later Dramatic Works

by Langston Hughes
University of Missouri (Oct 08, 2018)
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About the Editor
Leslie Catherine Sanders is on the faculty at York University and is the cofounder of the Centre for the Study of Black Cultures in Canada. She is the author of The Development of Black Theater in America and coeditor of The Collected Works of Langston Hughes, Volume 5, The Plays to 1942: Mulatto to The Sun Do Move.

About the Author
Langston Hughes was one of the most influential and prolific writers of the twentieth century.


Click for more detail about Damn Near White: An African American Family’s Rise From Slavery To Bittersweet Success by Carolyn Marie Wilkins Damn Near White: An African American Family’s Rise From Slavery To Bittersweet Success

by Carolyn Marie Wilkins
University of Missouri (Oct 10, 2010)
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Carolyn Wilkins grew up defending her racial identity. Because of her light complexion and wavy hair, she spent years struggling to convince others that she was black. Her family’s prominence set Carolyn’s experiences even further apart from those of the average African American. Her father and uncle were well-known lawyers who had graduated from Harvard Law School. Another uncle had been a child prodigy and protégé of Albert Einstein. And her grandfather had been America’s first black assistant secretary of labor.
Carolyn’s parents insisted she follow the color-conscious rituals of Chicago’s elite black bourgeoisie—experiences Carolyn recalls as some of the most miserable of her entire life. Only in the company of her mischievous Aunt Marjory, a woman who refused to let the conventions of “proper” black society limit her, does Carolyn feel a true connection to her family’s African American heritage.
When Aunt Marjory passes away, Carolyn inherits ten bulging scrapbooks filled with family history and memories. What she finds in these photo albums inspires her to discover the truth about her ancestors—a quest that will eventually involve years of research, thousands of miles of travel, and much soul-searching.
Carolyn learns that her great-grandfather John Bird Wilkins was born into slavery and went on to become a teacher, inventor, newspaperman, renegade Baptist minister, and a bigamist who abandoned five children. And when she discovers that her grandfather J. Ernest Wilkins may have been forced to resign from his labor department post by members of the Eisenhower administration, Carolyn must confront the bittersweet fruits of her family’s generations-long quest for status and approval.
Damn Near White is an insider’s portrait of an unusual American family. Readers will be drawn into Carolyn’s journey as she struggles to redefine herself in light of the long-buried secrets she uncovers. Tackling issues of class, color, and caste, Wilkins reflects on the changes of African American life in U.S. history through her dedicated search to discover her family’s powerful story.


Click for more detail about The City Of Refuge [New And Expanded Edition]: The Collected Stories Of Rudolph Fisher by Rudolph Fisher The City Of Refuge [New And Expanded Edition]: The Collected Stories Of Rudolph Fisher

by Rudolph Fisher
University of Missouri (Nov 03, 2008)
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One of the premier writers of the Harlem Renaissance, Rudolph Fisher wrote short stories depicting the multifaceted black urban experience that are still acclaimed today for their humor, grace, and objective view of Harlem life. Through his words, wrote the New York Times Book Review, “one feels, smells, and tastes his Harlem; its people come alive and one cares about them.” A definitive collection of Fisher’s short stories, The City of Refuge offers vibrant tales that deal with the problems faced by newcomers to the city, ancestor figures who struggle to instill a sense of integrity in the young, problems of violence and vengeance, and tensions of caste and class. This anthology has now been expanded to include seven previously unpublished stories that take up such themes as marital infidelity and passing for black and also relate the further adventures of Jinx and Bubber, the comic duo who appeared in Fisher’s two novels. This new edition also includes two unpublished speeches and the popular article “The Caucasian Storms Harlem,” describing the craze for black music and dance. John McCluskey’s introduction has been updated to place the additional works within the context of Fisher’s career while situating his oeuvre within the broader context of American writing during the twenties. Fisher recognized the dramatic and comic power in African American folklore and music and frequented Harlem’s many cabarets, speakeasies, and nightclubs, and at the core of his work is a strong regard for music as context and counterpoint. The City of Refuge now better captures the sounds of the city experience by presenting all of Fisher’s known stories. It offers a portrait of Harlem unmatched in depth and range by Fisher’s contemporaries or successors, celebrating, as Booklist noted, “the complexity of black urban life in its encounter with the dangers and delights of the city.” This expanded edition adds new perspectives to that experience and will enhance Fisher’s status for a new generation of readers.


Click for more detail about A Place Between Stations by Stephanie Allen A Place Between Stations

by Stephanie Allen
University of Missouri (Feb 03, 2003)
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Selma detests my small considerations of strangers. When she catches me nodding at the panhandlers she ignores, or opening doors for women I don’t know, she says nothing, but holds herself tall and aloof. She is doing it for the both of us. She is compensating for what she believes is a weakness in her husband that, even in this day and age, a black man still cannot afford. And she may be right. But at this stage of my life I feel not so much black or male, middle-aged or well-to-do or professional, as incomplete. I am son to my father, father to my boys, husband to my unhappy wife, but somehow more lost than found in the mix.A Place between Stations explores the lives of African American characters against the ever-present backdrop of race, but with the myriad complexities of individual minds and souls in the foreground.Two college students, bound by an intense but uneasy friendship, take an increasingly dangerous road trip through Florida. A widow faces her doubts about her long-dead husband by reliving an odd series of train rides she took along the Hudson River shoreline in the 1950s. An angry, fatherless girl roams a city at night, searching for an escape from the ambiguities of childhood. George Mattie, loner and reluctant guide, leads a misfit nineteenth-century circus caravan on an ill-fated journey through the northern Connecticut woods. In A Place between Stations, Stephanie Allen enlarges contemporary notions of what African American lives can be. Varied, to the point, and beautifully composed, this collection will appeal to all audiences.


Click for more detail about The Later Simple Stories by Langston Hughes The Later Simple Stories

by Langston Hughes
University of Missouri (Jun 11, 2002)
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About the Editor
Donna Akiba Sullivan Harper is Professor of English at Spelman College in Atlanta. She is the author of Not So Simple: The "Simple" Stories of Langston Hughes and the editor of The Collected Works of Langston Hughes, Volume 7: The Early Simple Stories.

About the Author
Langston Hughes was one of the most influential and prolific writers of the twentieth century.


Click for more detail about E. Franklin Frazier and Black Bourgeoisie by James E. Teele E. Franklin Frazier and Black Bourgeoisie

by James E. Teele
University of Missouri (May 02, 2002)
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When E. Franklin Frazier was elected the first black president of the American Sociological Association in 1948, he was established as the leading American scholar on the black family and was also recognized as a leading theorist on the dynamics of social change and race relations. By 1948 his lengthy list of publications included over fifty articles and four major books, including the acclaimed Negro Family in the United States. Frazier was known for his thorough scholarship and his mastery of skills in both history and sociology.With the publication of Bourgeoisie Noire in 1955 (translated in 1957 as Black Bourgeoisie), Frazier apparently set out on a different track, one in which he employed his skills in a critical analysis of the black middle class. The book met with mixed reviews and harsh criticism from the black middle and professional class. Yet Frazier stood solidly by his argument that the black middle class was marked by conspicuous consumption, wish fulfillment, and a world of make-believe. While Frazier published four additional books after 1948, Black Bourgeoisie remained by far his most controversial.Given his status in American sociology, there has been surprisingly little study of Frazier’s work. In E. Franklin Frazier and Black Bourgeoisie, a group of distinguished scholars remedies that lack, focusing on his often-scorned Black Bourgeoisie.This in-depth look at Frazier’s controversial publication is relevant to the growing concerns about racism, problems in our cities, the limitations of affirmative action, and the promise of self-help.


Click for more detail about Anyplace But Here by Arna Bontemps Anyplace But Here

by Arna Bontemps
University of Missouri (Apr 17, 1997)
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Originally published in 1945 as They Seek a City, this classic was revised and expanded in 1966 to include chapters on Marcus Garvey, the Black Muslims, Malcolm X, and the racial disturbances in Detroit, Chicago, and Watts. Filled with stories about real men and women who sought a new life in the North, Anyplace But Here depicts the theme of hope, undercut by disappointment, and hope renewed as it details the African American’s search for a home.


Click for more detail about The Color Line: Legacy for the Twenty-First Century (BRICK LECTURE SERIES) by John Hope Franklin The Color Line: Legacy for the Twenty-First Century (BRICK LECTURE SERIES)

by John Hope Franklin
University of Missouri (Mar 01, 1994)
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Nearly twenty years after his book Racial Equality in America, Franklin addressed the issue of racial inequality. In the Paul Anthony Brick Lectures given at the University of Missouri-Columbia, just one day after the "not guilty" verdict was returned in the trial of Los Angeles police officers for the beating of Rodney King, Franklin delivered a piercing depiction of the color line that persists in America. A scathing portrait of how discrimination has been allowed to flourish and a poignantly despairing prognosis for its end, The Color Line: Legacy for the Twenty-First Century is a perfect companion to the earlier volume. Together these books powerfully define and describe the long-held, but still unrealized, goal of equal rights for all Americans.