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Found 8 results

  1. The Hidden Colors: The Untold History of Aboriginal, Moor & African Descent Hidden Colors is a documentary about the real and untold history of people of color around the globe. This film discusses some of the reasons the contributions of African and aboriginal people have been left out of the pages of history. Traveling around the country, the film features scholars, historians, and social commentators who uncovered such amazing facts about things such as: *The original image of Christ *The true story about the Moors *The original people of Asia *The great west African empires *The presence of Africans in America before Columbus *The real reason slavery was ended And much more. Hidden Colors 2: The Triumph Of Melanin
  2. This is the 1st of a three part series on Race. Last night I screened this film with a "racially" mixed, but mostly Black group of about 25 people. During the discussion I decided to state that the government should get out of the business of tracking race. None of the Black people who reacted agreed with me. Of course I'm not surprised I knew the statement is tantamount to saying Obama is not a great president. Anywho, there was a white woman who agreed with me completely. Afterwards she approached me an explained some of the work she is doing to fight racism. She understood that institutionalized racism exists because the government continues to hold onto it. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bCR7vSD2Ohw What was most remarkable is that after watching this film there was at least one person who still used the language of race to explain differences in people that the film so clearly renounced as an "illusion".
  3. We've spoken quite a bit about Tim Wise here on these discussion board in the past Read more about Tim Wise Here
  4. We've spoken quite a bit about Tim Wise here on these discussion board in the past Read more about Tim Wise Here
  5. There was an interesting story on This American Life about a family in Maywood IL. The young woman (Italian) was date another student. Her beau was also Italian. At the same time the young lady was banging this Brother (Black) who was on the basketball team. The young lady became pregnant and as was custom during the time (about 40 years ago I believe), the girl's father forced the kids to get married When the child was born the young it was the Brother's child but the young lady was in complete denial -- so much so she truly believed the child was her husbands. The rest of the family, unaware of the young lady's jungle fever had no reason to suspect otherwise... at least not desire to. The family was Italian and suggested the darker complexion child, a boy, inherited Moorish trails from their southern Italian ancestry (which makes me think of Pioneer's argument ). Whenever the young man encountered people in public they assumed he was Black. The poor boy was confused too as he had no reason to believe he had a Black father. If you are into great telling of true stories check out This American Life, from Chicago Public Media. this story of just one of hundreds -- though fascinating this one is not even one of my favorites. It just reminded me of Cynique because the principals involved are from her neck of the woods. You can down load this and other stories (as podcasts) from Amazon or Itunes
  6. Has anyone heard of or read this book? The author, Deggans, is a popular critic out of Tampa Bay' Race-Baiter: How the Media Wields Dangerous Words to Divide a Nation by Eric Deggans Hardcover: 288 pages Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan (October 30, 2012) Gone is the era of Edward R. Murrow and Walter Cronkite, when news programs fought to gain the trust and respect of a wide spectrum of American viewers. Today, the fastest-growing news programs and media platforms are fighting hard for increasingly narrow segments of the public and playing on old prejudices and deep-rooted fears, coloring the conversation in the blogosphere and the cable news chatter to distract from the true issues at stake. Using the same tactics once used to mobilize political parties and committed voters, they send their fans coded messages and demonize opposing groups, in the process securing valuable audience share and website traffic. Race-baiter is a term born out of this tumultuous climate, coined by the conservative media to describe a person who uses racial tensions to arouse the passion and ire of a particular demographic. Even as the election of the first black president forces us all to reevaluate how we think about race, gender, culture, and class lines, some areas of modern media are working hard to push the same old buttons of conflict and division for new purposes. In Race-Baiter, veteran journalist and media critic Eric Deggans dissects the powerful ways modern media feeds fears, prejudices, and hate, while also tracing the history of the word and its consequences, intended or otherwise. Eric Deggans serves as TV/Media Critic for the Tampa Bay Times, Florida's largest newspaper. Some people call him the most critical guy in the place, because he's served as TV critic, Pop Music Critic and Media Critic at various times. He also provides regular commentaries on TV for National Public Radio and writes about media issues for the National Sports Journalism Center at Indiana University. Raised in Gary, Indiana, he earned a degree in journalism from Indiana University, working at newspapers in Pittsburgh, Pa. and Asbury Park, N.J. before landing in Florida. A drummer for more than 30 years, he performed in a band signed to Motown Records in the late 1980s and still plays the occasional show with local artists. He has won awards for his journalism from the Florida Society of News Editors, the National Association of Black Journalists, the Society for Features Journalism and American Association of Sunday and Feature Editors; his work also has appeared in the Washington Post, Seattle Times, Chicago Sun-Times, Ebony magazine and Rolling Stone Online.
  7. Rick Stevens Ascot Media Group Post Office Box 133032 The Woodlands, TX 77393 Office: (281) 333-3507 pr@ascotmediagroup.com www.ascotmediagroup.com FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE A Captivating Tale of an Unlikely Friendship Del Mar, CA – February 24, 2012 – Growing up in the tumultuous racial tension of the South in the 1960s, there was a secret in Betty Ann Hoehn's home: alcoholism. But the young girl also had a secret ally: Corinne. There was little shared between the two. Hoehn grew up in luxury; Corinne grew up in poverty. Betty Ann was white. Corinne was black. But when Corinne came to work for Betty Ann’s family, the friendship was instantaneous – sparking a heartfelt relationship that bonded them against all societal norms. In Corinne and Me: An Unlikely Friendship (AuthorHouse), author Betty Ann Hoehn reaches back to a time when racial issues determined daily activities for the majority of Americans. Her story captures the segregation that many experienced during that time and touches the heart through the story of one downtrodden, but courageous and loving woman who reached across racial lines to help a child and provide the unshakeable love and friendship that would take that child through the most difficult time in her life. “Through my life journey, Corinne has always been there for me; teaching me important lessons in life. My story highlights our unique relationship while drawing attention to important issues in our world today,” says Hoehn. “We are all God’s children; love knows no race, sex or religion.” For years, Hoehn watched as one by one the members of her family succumbed to "funny breath"--her family's euphemistic term for alcohol addiction in a time when addiction was not openly discussed. Little did she know that she, too, would fall victim to the disease. Her determination to overcome and lead a fulfilling and productive life is uplifting and encouraging to anyone who is facing this challenge or seeking to help a friend or family member as they face a life of recovery. Betty Ann Hoehn was born and raised in Memphis, Tenn., and currently resides in Del Mar, CA. Born in 1954, she grew up in the 1960s, a tumultuous time—strictly enforced segregation between blacks and whites, the civil rights movement, the Vietnam War, the feminist movement. She received her B.A. from Bowdoin College in 1976 and her M.A. from the University of Memphis in 1997. She is an art historian and independent lecturer. Corinne and Me: An Unlikely Friendship intertwines the racial and segregation issues of the 1960s with positive messages of acceptance, love and faith. Available at www.amazon.com and www.barnesandnoble.com For more information please visit: www.corrinneandme.com ###
  8. Let me know which banner ad below is consistently clicked most frequently and why. One of the banners below, after hundreds of thousands of impressions over the years, is clicked three times as many times at the other. Now I know the banners target different people (potential advertisers vs. readers), but I thought it might be a fun and intersting exercise anyway
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