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Troy

Evidence of technologically and CULTURALLY advanced ancient civilizations

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I watched this video last night. I found it very interesting as it pulled together pieces to a puzzle I always found curious.  If we look at the Pyramids of Giza, for example, how could we possibly ignore the fact the humanity MUST have known a lot more, in the past, than we recognize.

 

This is more than about failing to recognize the accomplishments of Black people, I don't expect white folks to do that, but clearly in an effort to erase the accomplishments of Black people, we are throwing the baby with the bath water.  I also believe our mortally corrupt and inept level of spiritual consciousness is also far behind what ancient an MUST have known.

 

This video below gives evidence.  I found the evidence of the flood myth, which I already knew predated the bible and was present in multiple cultures, particularly fascinating.  The book below is from the the presenter Graham Hancock.

 

 

Fingerprints of the Gods

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Here is a comment from TED who appear to be distancing themselves from comments Hancock made during a recent TEDx talk  I have not yet watched the video, I plan to watch it this evening.

 

Published on Jun 8, 2016

NOTE from TED: Please be aware that this talk contains outdated and counterfactual assertions, and should not be understood as a representation of modern scholarship on ancient civilizations.

If ancient civilizations interest you, TEDx Talks contain many fascinating and well-researched talks such as:

Sarah Parcak's talk on space arachaeology at TEDxYale: 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3GKzs...

Leslie van Gelder's talk on cave art at TEDxQueenstown:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BYGPc...

Sarah Kenderdine's talk on museums of the future at TEDxGateway:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VXhtw...

Since 2007, compelling evidence has been published in leading scientific journals confirming that fragments of a disintegrating giant comet struck the earth around 12,800 years ago. The impacts set in motion a mysterious 1,200-year global deep freeze that caused worldwide extinctions of species. Established theories about the emergence of civilization cite the invention of agriculture and monumental architecture some 11,600 years ago—immediately after the freeze. In this controversial presentation, best-selling author Graham Hancock argues that archaeologists, by not accounting for the cataclysm, have gravely misinterpreted history. What the record attests to is not the sudden invention of technology, but a transfer of technology to hunter-gatherers from a more advanced civilization.

British writer and journalist, Hancock specialises in unconventional theories involving ancient civilisations, stone monuments or megaliths, altered states of consciousness, ancient myths and astronomical/astrological data from the past. One of the main themes running through many of his books is a posited global connection with a "mother culture" from which he believes all ancient historical civilisations sprang.
Graham sees himself as a journalist who asks questions based upon observation and as someone who provides a counterbalance to what he perceives as the "unquestioned" acceptance and support given to orthodox views by the education system, the media, and by society at large.
His books have sold more than five million copies worldwide and have been translated to 27 languages.

 

 

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Very interesting. Raises many questions about  truth and fact when left to the interpretation of conventional thinking. Kind of shakes your faith in the arrogance of the scientific community which  tends to regard  itself as infallible. But down through the ages, the mavericks  who think outside the box, prove them wrong.   

 

I watch the Science and National Geographic channels "religiously", and they have series devoted to  theories about primitive life forms  being imported to earth by way of comets and asteroids, and that we are descendants of these alien entities whose origin is somewhere in outer spade. I think i'm an alien. :ph34r:

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Kind of shakes your faith in the arrogance of the scientific community which tends to regard itself as infallible.


It didn't shake MY faith in the "scientific community" because I didn't have too much faith in them to begin with.

I told you all that I didn't trust Western science or academics and that we as Black people need to develop OUR OWN institutions in order to uncover the truth and REAL science and medicine....and you call it ridiculous.....foolish.

Now some White dude comes on talking about pyramids and ancient cities and you think the veil has finally been lifted...lol.

Elijah Muhammad was teaching this stuff 80 years ago!

He said that Black people were the original people of this planet and had been ruling it and building great cities and civilizations.....much greater than what we have today....for millions of years BEFORE White people even existed.


First they tried to deny it and limited everything in history to fit within the 6000 years of the Biblical reference.

Now that they're discovering ancient ruins hundred of thousands of years old and bones millions of years old, now they want to claim SPACE ALIENS must have built these monuments....lol.

We better build colleges and universities of our own and teach our own children REAL history instead of going by his-story of what happened.

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@Pioneer1i have never downplayed Africa as being the cradle of civilization and the originators of all the things that the Greeks and Romans co-opted and took credit for. I didn't need Elijah Muhammad to tell me this.  I learned it from my father long before i ever heard of Elijah Muhammad.   And my father learned it from his forebears because black people always believed they were descended from kings and warriors.   I've also always said that history is written by conquerors who revise it to make themselves look good.   


Or have i ever discounted that diet and climate and DNA  are unique to different species. My input as always been that you can't apply a standard rule for people of color because they are hybrid and made up of different ethnic bloodlines.
 

Your generalizations have always been what I've disputed. So, stop taking bows.  

 

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If you are going to create black science you will also need to o create a language. Since language limits thinkng.

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I may be wrong but I don't believe Elijah Muhammad taught that Africa was the cradle of civilization.

I believe he taught that Black people who were already on this planet in Asia WENT DOWN into Africa thousands of years ago and began a new form of civilization and that's where modern Africans came from.


Many in the Nation of Islam believe that true Black civilization actually DEVOLVED or DEGENERATED when a segment of it went down into Africa.

Most people only get Black history that starts with Blacks being slaves in the United States (let alone other nations in the Americas).

More advanced students begin to learn of our history when we were in Africa.

But very few learn about what we had BEFORE we were in Africa.

 

 


 

If you are going to create black science you will also need to o create a language. Since language limits thinking.
 

You're right in that certain languages like ENGLISH limits one's thinking.

One of the reason Black people invented "Ebonics" and speak so much slang and continue to invent new definitions of old words in the English language is because this language is so limited and our intellect and emotions are so complex that there are few if any words in the English language that can actually capture the full meaning of how we feel or what thoughts were're trying to convey.

For example, the word "front" already had a meaning in English.
But since we didn't know of a word in English to describe someone who pretends to be something they're not or pretends to feel a certain way they don't we had to invent one called "frontin".....lol.

"Man stop frontin'......" , lol.

Who else but Black Americans would know what we mean by "Bebe's Kids"....lol.

I haven't really studies African languages so I don't know how thorough they are at capturing African thought and concept, and really I don't know if learning an African language would be appropriate today anyway since we have been exposed to so much more in this modern world than the limited world that traditional African languages were developed in.

But I believe a new language could be invented that adequately captures the complexities of African intellect and emotion.

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The reason black people didn't know their history was because they didn't read what was written about it.  The knowledge was there, it just had to be pursued.  During the Harlem Renaissance, back in the '20s, the black literati  knew about African civilizations, especially about the Moors.     

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@Pioneer1 there are plenty of English words to convey the meaning of fronting, including the word "fronting,"  Mispronunciation of words is another matter.

 

But to your point and Del's, there are people who are concerned about the loss of languages.  Apparently there are about 7,000 languages, most of which will disappearing quite rapidly.  People are concerned that the loss of the languages will mean a loss of a real understanding of the cultures. 

 

Cynique is right. While much of our history was destroyed; there is a lot we could know if we bothered to crack a book every once in a while... unfortunately much of information obtained by us seems to be derived from social media.

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Back in the early 2000s when I was researching for my first novel - Graham Hancock's findings turned up a lot in my search on both the internet and in books.  This dude is relentless, I see. He is not letting it go.  In fact, his reporting pointed me to the "Kebra Nagast" (glory of kings) and that led to more information available in Ethiopia and Eritrea about the underground churches and the fact that it was the birthplace of Christianity... Thank you for sharing this - I remember how proud I was to learn all this about African continent...and it took me on an odyssey (both inside my novel and outside) to learn a lot more about our knowledge of electricity et al ...in fact the protagonist in my book intimates that she went to a technology high school because of her ancestors. ;) 

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Cynique
 

The reason black people didn't know their history was because they didn't read what was written about it. The knowledge was there, it just had to be pursued. During the Harlem Renaissance, back in the '20s, the black literati knew about African civilizations, especially about the Moors.


Most Black people in the 20s thought the Black race was Black due to a curse on Ham and they saw Africa as a jungle of savages that they had to distance themselves from.


Besides, most Black people were functionally illiterate back in the 20s.
How could they have read what was there when most couldn't even read PERIOD?

Expecting them to sit down in a book store and educate themselves on Black history or go down to the local community college and enroll themselves in a Black studies course would be absured.

It took honorable men like Marcus Garvey and Elijah Muhammad to come along, instill pride in them, and teach them better.

 

 

 

Troy
 

plenty of English words to convey the meaning of fronting, including the word "fronting," Mispronunciation of words is another matter.


Well what English word would you use to convey the full meaning of Black American 70s terms like "jive" or "solid"?

It would take you an entire paragraph to explain the full meaning of the word "jive" alone and how it's used in each context.


Infact, the complaint I constantly hear from many Latinos is that there are words in Spanish that can't even be properly translated in English because there is no equivalent in English thought.
I've heard the same thing from Africans.

The English language is not old enough nor sophisticated enough to handle the emotional and intellectual complexities of Black people which is why we have to constantly invent slang and add our own definition to words that already exist.

The "n word" is a good example of this.

The original word with the "er" at the end has a totally different meaning used by most young people today pronounced with an "a" at the end.

Same word.....but a different pronouciation changes the meaning.

The same can be said for the words "brother" or "sister".


 

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The so called Eskimo, I heard somewhere has 20 different words for "snow," implying a more profound understanding in the differences in that form of precipitation.  I know some snow is better at making snow balls that other types of snow.  I call the former type of snow "packing snow."  I just call the other type of snow..."snow."

 

Black folks use the the word snow in a completely different context to mean a white person, but there is no real distinction in the meaning of the two words "snow" and "white," it is just slang or a funky way of speaking.

 

@Pioneer1 since you brought it up why don't you explain what the words "Solid" and "Jive" mean, and how those concepts can not be expressed with English language.

 

As I've said I'm not suggesting that meaning can't be lost in translation. I'm disputing is that much of what you are suggesting about Black slang is not the same thing (in the vast majority of cases). Perhaps you'll demonstrate and exception with your definition of "solid." 

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@Pioneer1Ohhhh puleeze.You and your generalities based on anecdotal evidence that stems from what you heard or somebody told you. "Most this, most that",most, hell!; Never any  proof.  How's this for some anecdotal evidence.  i grew up around many people who were around during the 20s and they were not functionally illiterate. You need to get your time line straight because there was a  substantial black middleclass  in that era both in the north and the south where preachers and teacher and doctors and lawyers were the ruling class, their society centered around the historically black colleges. You're the one who's absurd. 

 

Just because illiteracy was true of the losers corralled by  Elljah Muhammad  doesn't mean it was true of every one. i don't know why you keep holding this lecherous con man up as a paragon of virtue and wisdom. Incidentally i knew a preacher and his wife in my hometown who adopted one of the children he fathered with a young girl. Using your methods, this is proof enough of him being a con man, - something Malcolm eventually discovered.

 

Marcus Garvey was around during the Harlem Renaissance and the artists and intellects who made up this movement were his peers. Black preachers in their pulpits back then weren't all calling blacks the seed of HAM, some were talking about Egypt being in African and Egyptians being the original blacks, - kings and warriors and stone masons.  i've been hearing about ZULU warriors all my life, not to mention claims of Cleopatra being black.  .

 

The black experience differs from person to person, region to region, city to country, north to south, so stop all your assertions that don't pertain to everybody.  

 

 

 

      . 

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Troy
 

The so called Eskimo, I heard somewhere has 20 different words for "snow," implying a more profound understanding in the differences in that form of precipitation. I know some snow is better at making snow balls that other types of snow. I call the former type of snow "packing snow." I just call the other type of snow..."snow."

Black folks use the the word snow in a completely different context to mean a white person, but there is no real distinction in the meaning of the two words "snow" and "white," it is just slang or a funky way of speaking.

 

Your comparison is a bit faulty.

You're comparing people who are using THEIR WORDS in THEIR LANGUAGE to convey their thoughts......with people who are using OTHER PEOPLE'S WORDS from OTHER PEOPLE'S LANGUAGE to convey their thoughts.

The Inuit or Eskimos are people of color, and in most languages invented by people of color the meaning isn't just in the word but in the TONE of how the word is said.

This is the case whether they are African, Asian, or Native American (Eskimos under this category).

Most languages from Asia and Africa are TONAL, meaning they can use the same word but the tone you use it in will give it a totally different meaning.

On the other hand, in most European languages like English and French each word supposedly has only one meaning and they're supposed to invent more words for newer concepts....but they've stopped so.

Which is one of the reasons even WHITE PEOPLE have adopted the Black habit of using slang and giving the same words different meaning....because even they have ran out of ideas for new words, lol..


Blacks, Asians, and Native Americans (most Latinos) are an emotional people and we focus more on TONE than on words and this becomes a problem when we're forced to speak in European languages that limits the amount of words spoken.


 

 

 


@Pioneer1 since you brought it up why don't you explain what the words "Solid" and "Jive" mean, and how those concepts can not be expressed with English language.

As I've said I'm not suggesting that meaning can't be lost in translation. I'm disputing is that much of what you are suggesting about Black slang is not the same thing (in the vast majority of cases). Perhaps you'll demonstrate and exception with your definition of "solid."


Both "solid" and "jive" had several meanings because....again...there weren't ENOUGH words in the English language to properly convey the different type of thoughts and feelings we used those words to convey.

I was born in the early 70s and remember a little bit of it but I'm sure you remember more of it than me and probably a bit of the 60s where the word "solid" was in heavy use.

Speaking of "heavy"....that was another term we used....lol.


However from what I remember of "solid" it meant:

1. A plan of action strongly agreed upon.
2. A subject of conversation strongly agreed upon
3. I remember brothers greeting eachother with a hand claspe and saying "solid" as a form of comradery.
4. I also remember brothers using the term to describe something well put together like a "solid" deal or a "solid" job.


Now "jive" is interesting because although I'm no etymologist I believe it has it's origins in the English word "jibberish".
White people had a habit of calling languages they didn't understand "jibberish" and Black people must have picked up on this and started calling the way they spoke to eachother "jive".

Jiibberish-jibe-jive......

The meanings of Jive:

1. I've heard it used to mean someone was joking.
2. It meant that someone was bullshitting when they had a job to do like shucking and jiving.
3. I remember it being an all around term for something or someone not to be taken seriously or respected, especially when they added the suffix "ass" on the end of it...lol.

Jive-ass this and jive-ass that....lol...e.i.. " that jive-ass lawyer".

 

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Troy's example is closer to my point. The language you learn affects how you think. 

 

The Eskimo example is a good one. Its not actually true though. They have different ways of doing describing snow. Because they ability to discern different types of snow is a matter of survival. 

 

Some languages are not dependent on word order. And this effects how you think.

 

I heard but can't verify, but certain words that AA use are Bantu. Ok is Wolof

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Pioneer English is my language and has been for generation--at least as far back as I can track down every ancestors line. What is your language?

 

Sometimes we make up words simply because we don't have the vocabulary to use the words which already exist.

 

We used to use solid synonymously with favor.  As in, "Ma Brother, would you do this solid."  Or it way to express gratitude as in,

 

"Yo nigga, I tole 'ole girl I was wit you last night. Cool/"

"''Course mah nigga."

"Solid."

 

Sure skiers have more ways of describing snow too.

 

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The word "jive" came into prominence among blacks in the early 1940s among black musicians, who had a colorful lingo all of their own, a lot of which was incorporated into black speech over the years, i'm pretty sure "solid" as in "solid, Jack", originated with them as well as phrases like "gimme some skin" being a request for a handshake.  This is just colorful creative speech!

 

Black people have a very special relationship with the word "be".  Maybe because it assures them that they really exist.  So, - they "be",  he "be" and do she "be"?  

 

"Aks" is commonly substituted for "ask" by black folks, supposedly  because black tongues have a hard time negotiating what it takes to pronounce "ask" correctly.  It's really just careless speech and a tell-tale sign that no matter how far you come, you still don't correctly pronounce a 3-letter word.   :o  

 

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Troy
 

We used to use solid synonymously with favor. As in, "Ma Brother, would you do this solid."
 

You know I actually forgot about that definition of it.
I've heard it used that way a few times also.

The problem with Black American culture is it's too unstable and constantly changing.
As soon as you get used to a style of clothes or words, it changes 5-10 years later.

Basically we keep a style or manner of speech for as long as it can remain among us, but as soon as White people learn and begin to adopt it....we change it up again to throw them off, lol.




Cynique

 

Black people have a very special relationship with the word "be". Maybe because it assures them that they really exist. So, - they "be", he "be" and do she "be"?


Traveling around the nation, I've noticed that the use of "be" is pretty consistent in Black communities regardless of region.

For example we'll say, "When them kids come to our house they be all over the place".

Or, " She be playing the lottery every day and don't never win".


But you never hear Black people say,
"I can't talk because I be driving on the freeway right now".

Or, "Do you be thirsty and want a drank of water?"

 

Whether it's Detroit, New York, Mississippi, or Los Angeles we all seem to use similar rules of grammer.

That's how I know the concept of EBONICS is legitimate.

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I may have told my "ask" story before but check this out.

 

When i was working on my MBA and NYU's Stern school of business I was giving a preliminary presentation for a final project in a marketing class.  Now keep in mind this is an all white class, the professor, my teams members and my class mates--all white.

 

During my portion of the presentation I said,

 

"We axed over 100 people which brand of sneakers they prefer." 

 

No one batted an eye or made a comment.  Later however one of my teammates, a guy I became friendly with, told me the professor told him that I mispronounced the word "asked."  The professor NEVER said a word to me!  But felt it perfectly OK to talk about me with the other white people, in my absence.  I was angered by this, but trust me I never EVER mispronounced that word again.

 

I simply was not aware that I was mispronouncing the word.  It was the way I was taught to say the word, and no one even after 7 years of college, at that point, ever corrected me--not even that racist professor at Stern, and she was racist--otherwise she would have immediately corrected me the way I do my students.

 

Obviously, I was much more sensitive to this and have observed many Black people across all classes and education levels mispronounce the word the way I had.  I also wonder how white people negatively judge Black folks on the way we speak in general.

 

Now my experience is just an anecdote, but I think it is reflects of how we are judged by white people and even sidity Black folks based upon the way we speak.

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I confess to being a stickler for correct grammar and speech. I also have a fascination with language and words and what they say or don't say by implication, and how they are sometimes inadequate in capturing an emotion or conveying a message; not to mention how they can be misinterpreted because people hear what they want to hear. What power words pack!  

 

I realize that I'm "old school" and that my sentiments on this subject  can be considered superficial and pedantic in today's world.  But, my thinking as has always been that when you can compete with your would-be oppressor on his level by correctly using his language, this neutralizes his advantage and very often gains his respect. So  correct speech can be a tool as well as a weapon.  This is just an eccentricity of mine, I guess.  

 

Of course there are people who can effectively get their point across by using incorrect grammar or speaking slang, but there will always be those who will judge and classify you by your speech.  Just as when it comes to black folks, made-up, multi-syllable names with dashes and apostrophes  send up red flags to white employees, whether justified or not.

 

Of course, out of necessity,  black folks are bilingual when it comes to Standard English and Ebonics. 

 

BTW, one thing that many people seem to snag on when writing, is the difference between the words, "effect" and "affect". "Affect" is a verb used to express action.  "Effect" is a noun because it is the name of a thing.   So, the sunshine affects the flowers because the "effect" of the sun helps them grow.  Also, no apostrophe is necessary when "its" is used as a possessive pronoun because it is a possessive pronoun on its own.  "It's" contains an apostrophe when it is used as a contraction of "it is".  So, it's cold out side.  And the weather is taking its time to warm up. This is for detail-oriented people.

 

Since cursive writing is becoming extinct, perhaps grammatical technicalities will, too.  Language does gradually evolve in  collaboration with its relevancy to the culture.   

 

 

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After decades of using a computer to communicate with other and in a professional capacity I can no longer legibly write in cursive. My signature if little better that the crawled X, used by illiterate folks.

 

Outside of cards I rarely receive information written that way.

 

And this goes to my point slang does not actually communicate more information, it is just communicated it differently as in the difference between aks and ask.

 

What I have seen is a shrinking of our vocabulary.  We started saying "naa'mean" instead actually expressing our thoughts.  

 

Pioneers describes this as inventing language, I view it as a devolution of language, because less is being communicated--not more.  Some believe a limited vocabulary limits depth of thought.  I'm not so sure about that, but if those thoughts can't be expressed to others it makes little difference 

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Troy

I believe the grammar among Black people in the United States have devolved also.
I watch some old footage of common Black people being interviewed back in the 50s and 60s and even poor and working class Black people seemed to have a better pride in how they talked and used better grammar than most of the youth today.

But this devolution of Black grammar is different than "Black Slang" which are the words we invent to convey our thoughts which is also different than "Ebonics" which is our style and structure of speech  or it's syntax.


 

The professor NEVER said a word to me! But felt it perfectly OK to talk about me with the other white people, in my absence. I was angered by this, but trust me I never EVER mispronounced that word again.


That's what they do!

Often times when White people have a problem with you OR OTHER BLACK PEOPLE they may may not say anything to your face about it, but they'll turn right around and rattle on and on about it to other White people.

And this is one of the things I try to get across to other Black people, especially younger Black people and how they conduct themselves in public.

Noticing this for years I've come to the conclusion that there can only be 2 reasons for this:

1. They fear the reaction of Black people if they decide to call them on errors they make in speech and behavior.

or.

2. They secretly RELISH observing Black people making errors in public because they feel it makes them look better or superior.




Cynique

Not only has cursive (or as my Father used to call it "writing") become nearly extinct among many young people, a friend of mine who is a social worker and had to take SHORT-HAND told me most of the youth she works with hadn't even heard of the term before.

But aren't you glad you went to school in AMERICA where you can study the English language and grammar all you want in a nice air conditioned room with your own desk and books with no one bothering you or "affecting" your studies?


;) Be honest........

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If a professor is intimidated by the reaction they may get from a student they are correcting, they should not be teaching.

 

The reason was certainly #2. I know the woman felt she was better than me and she obviously had no desire to help me. The whole environment reeked of white privilege. There were well over 500 MBA students in my class, and only a handful of Black men. the school was in NYC. There were only two Black men from NYC (I was one of them). I never had a Black professor.  We were all destined to work for companies with the same demographics and sensibilities.    

 

Some Black men thrive in this environment I was not one of them.  Sure i did my job and often enjoyed it, but I always felt like an outsider, as if I did not belong.  This could be me projecting my own bias as well, but the reality I grew tired of "Frontin."

 

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@Pioneer1 i don't know why you are so obsessed with getting me to join the "I love america" club. I also don't understand why you can't see that my having managed to co-exist by staying under the radar in this bull shit country does not change the awful history or disgusting hypocrisy that is so objectionable to me, and which does not inspire feelings of patriotism or respect on my part. Or is my dislike for amerikka something i have to work at because it comes natural to me after a lifetime of observance.  

 

Any gratitude i have is directed at Fate, which figured into my being born in a rich  country where being a second class citizen is less inconvenient than in the poor corrupt countries who also have terrible histories.  

 

English is an international language which does not exclusively belong to America. It just happens to be the language i speak, so it is the one in which i marinate.  

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Troy


We were all destined to work for companies with the same demographics and sensibilities.

Some Black men thrive in this environment I was not one of them. Sure i did my job and often enjoyed it, but I always felt like an outsider, as if I did not belong. This could be me projecting my own bias as well, but the reality I grew tired of "Frontin."


And this is the very thing I tell a lot of Black students who go to these major universities.
Whatever they're going through in college, I told them to magnify it by 10.

There's a certain foul spirit or "off" demeanor in corporate environments that turns most Black men off, especially straight and masculine Black men.

The business world was designed by White men for White men, Black men tend to have the most success when they venture off and get their own businesses.

One of the books I like to read is one by a brother named Reginal Lewis:

Image result for why should white guys have all the fun

 
He talks about the problems of Black men working in corporate America and how he decided to venture off and get his OWN enterprise going.



 

Cynique

English is an international language which does not exclusively belong to America.


Ofcourse not..
Just like diamonds, gold, oil, or anything else of value....it's popular and in high demand so it gets exported, lol.

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Reggie Lewis worked Michael Milliken who was not Black, but one of the sharpest minds and weathiest in the history of Finance. I happened to work at the same company. And saw Reggie Lewis in the Elevator. He did the biggest offshore deal at about 2 Billion in 1987.

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I never met Lewis, but I've been to two of his homes.  There are many reasons most of us will never be a Reggie Lewis.  But working for, and being beholden to, others is our greatest weakness for building wealth.  Sure one can have a very comfortable lifestyle working in a corporation, but that can be taken from you at anytime and we can't help anyone else.  This is why Black wealth is so precarious.  

 

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You guys are aware that Reggie Lewis died in 1993 at age 50 of a brain tumor, aren't you?  To have become a billionaire before age 50 makes him even more extraordinary.  How ironic that the brain which enabled him to be so brilliant,  was the source of his untimely death. 

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2 hours ago, Cynique said:

You guys are aware that Reggie Lewis died in 1993 at age 50 of a brain tumor, aren't you?  To have become a billionaire before age 50 makes him even more extraordinary.  How ironic that the brain which enabled him to be so brilliant,  was the source of his untimely death. 

@Cynique  The way you put this made me laugh (inappropriately I might add.  Good thing I was alone)  I read the first few chapters of that book and maybe it was the way his brain was formed but from the book - he nailed the art of the deal way before he got to college.   He was made for wall street  because he was a street smart hustler according to the book's opening, It is an interesting book. 

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Troy and Del

I found both of your encounters (or proxy encounters) with our brother Reginald interesting if not slightly fascinating.

When I read his book I wished we had Black men like that in every major city, it would have been very inspirational.

Sure Troy, most Black people would never become a Reggie Lewis.
Hell, most White people would never be.

That man had the brains, the charisma, and happened to be born in the right place at the right time to do what he did.

But what he could have done is TEACH what he did know so that those few who DO have his talents and abilities can learn and not only do what he did but build upon his work and exceed it......and so on and so forth one generation after the next.



Cynique

Yes I knew of his untimely death.
I declined to mention it but I figured it would come up eventually if the conservation about him continued.

Ofcourse dying of such an illness is a bad thing in and of itself, but for a Black person that was so young with so much wealth and potential to succumb to it makes it even worse.

When you speak of the irony of his death and his smarts, are you insinuating some sort of conspiracy?

 

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@Pioneer1No, i'm not  insinuating that there was some sort of conspiracy  involved in his death.  Any other silly questions?

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Michael Miliken made $550 million in Bonus in 1986. So his Bonus was more money than McDonald's made that year. Yeah he was constantly on his Cell phone and he smoked cigars. Since I am name dropping I also met Ken Chenault when I was an Intern at American Express. He is another hitter. Also Clifton Wharton who stays under the radar.

 

Man Pioneer most people don't have the focus or drive to work with any of those cats. They are on a next level. Most people can't alk for ten minutes on any subject. Although I am pretty sure you could. And I am not being sarcastic or ironic.

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@Del, do you mean, "Most people can't [t]alk for ten minutes on any subject of substance?  You you and I both know people can talk at length about sports, the stuff they've seen on social media, or gossip about celebrities.

 

Funny thing about the solar eclipse coming up, no one I've spoken to about it (in the physical world) expressed any interest in it :(  Ancient civilizations seemed to be much more interested in what went on in the heavens.  Maybe it was because they could actually see the sky back then...

 

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Cynique
 

No i'm not insinuating that there was some sort of conspiracy involved in his death. Any other silly questions?


Yeah.
America made this brother rich.

Why do you diss a country that produces rich Black folks?

Answer me that....and I'm good, lol.



 

Del and Troy

They say that Johnny Cochran was constantly on his cell phone, and HE TOO died of brain cancer.



Man Pioneer most people don't have the focus or drive to work with any of those cats. They are on a next level. Most people can't alk for ten minutes on any subject. Although I am pretty sure you could. And I am not being sarcastic or ironic.


It's focus, drive, discipline but also a strong dose of intelligence or good old fashioned MOTHER WIT.

Reginald Lewis was a lawyer before he got into real estate so he wasn't an idiot to begin with and like Cynique said he was doing impressive things even as a child.


Also when it comes to "people" industries like real estate where you really have to sell items or ideas....CHARISMA plays a huge role in your success.

I think Reginald....like Oprah....had a lot of this.

Unlike the stock market where you can be successful by studying trends and patterns, in sales and marketing you have to know how to make people trust and like you enough to buy from you.
Hell, even if you're a stock broker you have to do have this ability until you reach a certain amount of success.

Some people just can't do this despite their high level of intelligence.
They don't have the charisma or likeability to gain the trust of people.

When I go to the local universities in my region and look at many of the young people, they may be very smart with numbers and facts and can regurgitate a lot of information....but when it comes to "reading" people and basic human psychology that some people learn in the 6th grade...they're complete failures.


 

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@Pioneer1 how many years did you work on Wall Street or in Real Estate. 

My first full time job was being the profit and loss accountant for a $2 billion portfolio at Drexel Burnham Lambert on Wall Street.

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@Pioneer1 in answer to your second silly question, a question indicative of how your mind seems incapable of processing no matter how many times i explain it to you, Reggie Lewis is an exception to the rule, a perfect example of a black man who succeeded in spite of the odds being stacked against black people because he was an extraordinary individual with a brilliant mind.  Has the gist of this answer registered with you yet or do i have to look forward to another silly example of your  need to bring me down to your groveling level of loving this wunnerful country.  i don't give a damn whether you love amerikka or not so why are you so determined to convert me into giving a damn about this bull shit bigoted country whose idiotic president exemplifies half the population but who, nevertheless, is obliquely approved of by you on a regular basis.  SMH

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Pioneer respects finncial power. Billionaires or the apex prime alphas. 

@Pioneer1 can you go into more detail how Wall Street works from your perspective? 

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Del
 

How many years did you work on Wall Street or in Real Estate.

If I told you, you probably wouldn't believe me.
So I might as well not even bother telling you.


 

My first full time job was being the profit and loss accountant for a $2 billion portfolio at Drexel Burnham Lambert on Wall Street.
 

LOL....is the fact that you had to run off to Australia,  "lay low", and get into astrology indicative of what you were doing there?


@Pioneer1 can you go into more detail how Wall Street works from your perspective?


Look at who Wall Street gave us.....Donald Trump.
That should tell you all you need to know.

Lol.





Cynique

 

in answer to your second silly question, a question indicative of how your mind seems incapable of processing no matter how many times i explain it to you, Reggie Lewis is an exception to the rule, a perfect example of a black man who succeeded in spite of the odds being stacked against black people because he was an extraordinary individual with a brilliant mind. Has the gist of this answer registered with you yet or do i have to look forward to another silly example of your need to bring me down to your groveling level of loving this wunnerful country. i don't give a damn whether you love amerikka or not so why are you so determined to convert me into giving a damn about this bull shit bigoted country whose idiotic president exemplifies half the population but who, nevertheless, is obliquely approved of by you on a regular basis. SMH
 

You're a moderator now.....you're moving up in the world baby!

You're in upper management so you need to use more restraint in your emotions and be easy on the abusive language, lol.

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 Making me a moderator was just a temporary formality to make it easier for me to log in.  

 

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