Jump to content
Milton

Should the Black Fantastic always focus on 'The Struggle?"

Recommended Posts

No one can doubt the rise of Black Speculative Fiction, Afrofuturism or whatever you deem to call it. However, there seems to be a trend where most of these narratives seem to revolve 'The Struggle.' Should this be necessity for Black Speculative fiction, or should it incorporate all aspects of speculative fiction? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Guess I should have been more specific. 🙂 I meant the Black struggle, as in racism and discrimination. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Absolutely not.

 

Imagine a world in which Black people operated completely free of racism, oppression, and prejudice --  Even the world of Wakanda included crazy white people trying to steal technology or butt in...

 

White people do it all the time, they tell their stories entirely free of, or influenced by, anyone else. We rarely do it.

 

I think it would be the ultimate form of protest literature.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is interesting discussion. I think the writer should make his or her decision about how to use his/her voice. Some writers just like to tell an exciting story. And I think sometimes we get sick of the struggle and just want to be entertained. And that's okay, For me, personally, I try to make a statement and entertain folks. But, in a lot of my writing I focus on global struggles that affect everybody (my Immortal series). Pollution, for example, wouldn't be labeled a "black struggle," but it affects black folks just the same -- and sometimes worse if it's in a poor neighborhood.   

 

In my Mona Livelong series, I have touched on racism, but it's an alternate world which I for me makes it easier to write about. And I explore it with my characters ... there's always a reason why a villain is a villain.  

 

Funny thing, I never make these decisions before I start writing-- they just jump into my head.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/11/2020 at 5:51 PM, Troy said:

White people do it all the time, they tell their stories entirely free of, or influenced by, anyone else. We rarely do it.

@Troy OMG! Yes, most stories written by black authors aren't free of another ethnic group's influence.  This is why I don't read most black books and rarely watch black dramas. And no, I haven't seen Black Panther - but I did watch Netflix's "Raising Dion." Some parts were "laugh out loud," and I did appreciate the message.


But mostly, in either medium, we as an ethnic group are reactionary instead of responsive to our environment.

 

When I read, I look for someone I can relate to in the pages or screen.  My personal struggles rarely, if ever, have to do with racism.  Although I subscribe to "intersectional feminism" beliefs, it hasn't been my struggle either. In fact, being a black woman has afforded me more opportunities than if I were a regular white man. So when I read or watch thrillers, mysteries, horror, sci-fi - it's usually written by a white man.

Although I've recently found Film producer Ben Watkins, Victor Lavalle, two men who identify as black, which both speak to me on several levels.both speak to me on several levels. I think because they both write strong ass, black women, with an agency in their films and stories. I'm also looking forward to reading N.K. Jemisin. 

But I digress, white men have different struggles but struggles that most black people face in addition to racism, misogyny, sexism, etc... So, I read them to learn how to solve conflicts that exist outside of the "ism" schism.

 

So yes, please battle other conflicts that are also pertinent to our existence on this big blue marble. We've spent 400 years fighting racism... I'm not sure I want to escape into a book that also battles it too. 

 

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...