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Showing content with the highest reputation since 04/03/2019 in Posts

  1. 5 points
    @Troy I can't remember disagreeing with @Cynique @Chevdove or @zaji in any way that would cause me to want to express that disagreement. I may have a different opinion about something but their presentation allows for me to consider their perspective. I've even found myself doing some research and keeping an open mind for more information to possibly advance the discussion. But I don't disagree with them. Even if you can find where I said "I disagree" know that I misspoke. I believe most women are socialized to have a perspective that is built on a foundation of evidence. Unfortunately, here in America women are often dismissed as NOT having knowledge about a topic. Even In your thread about instagram - you decided I didn't have knowledge of world wide web and its commercial activities. You didn't even ask me, first. But that's the world women live in - so when we express an opinion or subjective observation, trust most of us have a mountain of evidence to back it up. I don't bet on stuff. Aside: I used to bet on horses but racing horses is cruel and inhumane so I don't do it anymore. I would absolutely miss Cynique if she leaves the board - but I saw that in my email and I had to stop what I was doing to respond to this thread. I really appreciate you @Cynique ! You add the je ne sais quoi to this forum that allows so many of us to think and consider your words, experiences and thoughts. You are a magus and beautiful philosopher! ♥️
  2. 4 points
    We are all aware of the mainstream media's negative narrative about black men. We are constantly bombarded with stories of high incarceration rates, black on black violence, deadbeat dads and of course police brutality. From the outside looking in it appears that black men are destined for failure and there is nothing that can be done to change the implied negative trajectory that black men are on. But is the media's narrative true? Are black men really an endangered species? I believe the answer is an emphatic no and I have made it my life's to work to support and empower black men to overcome the negative stereotypes and to create extraordinary lives. In order for black men to succeed the first thing they must do is understand how societal conditioning contributes to creating a negative mindset and attitude about what it means to be a black man. Too many black men feel hopeless and powerless as a result of the constant barrage of negative images and stories coming not only from the white biased media but also from the black media that definitely contributes to the negative narratives about what it means to be black. So what can be done to support black men in overcoming the multiplicity of challenges they face on a daily basis? How can we help change the mindset of black men and empower them to know they have unlimited potential and the future is extremely bright for those who are willing to put forth the effort? I believe the key to resolving a large percentage of challenges facing black them is to support them in changing their own inner narrative about themselves. The good book says; "be ye not conformed to this world, but be ye transformed by the renewing of your mind." Herein lies the key to transforming black men's lives. We must be willing to encourage black men to examine the internal negative beliefs and perceptions they have about themselves. We must engage them in a dialog about what they believe, how they feel and what they think about being black. Too many times their inner dialog about themselves is so negative they have no choice other than to act out that negative internal dialog. Therefore it is incumbent upon us to change their inner dialog by providing resources that support them in changing their negative mindset and attitude. This can be accomplished through things like workshops and seminars, reading books, listening to audio programs and creating support groups that provide safe spaces for them to speak openly about the highs and lows, joys and pain of being a black man. When we help them change their inner dialog about themselves it will give them a sense of optimism and hope for the future which will then encourage them to develop a positive mindset and attitude that will keep them from falling victim to negative media generated narratives about who they are. It is definitely possible for any black man to live an extraordinary life. We are all capable of creating inner peace, dynamic health, great relationships and financial abundance. To do so, a black man must be willing to take 100% responsibility for his life turning out the way he wants it to. The only way to do this is through changing his inner narrative about himself and recognizing that he has the capacity to do anything he sets his mind to.
  3. 4 points
    The first 24 hour Black News Channel is expected to launch November 15, 2019 @6:00 AM. The cable network is the brainchild of J.C. Watts, Jr., former U.S Representative (R-Oklahoma) now BNC chairman and Veteran Journalist Bob Brilliante who will serve as the cable network's CEO. BNC Newsroom management made their rounds at the National Association Black Journalists Job fair in Miami, FL earlier this month. The news channel, headquartered in Tallahassee, Fl, will broadcast to 33 million households nationwide with a major presence in Los Angeles, Atlanta and New York. ~MH You can read the release here: https://blacknewschannel.com/wp-content/uploads/BNC_NABJ-Press-Release_2019.pdf
  4. 4 points
    a student loan paid, and your student loan is paid and your student loan is paid too... The graduating class of Morehouse College had commencement Keynote Speaker Billionaire Robert F. Smith give them a send off into the real world...but in addition to parting words he will allow these seniors to be debt-free to the tune of $40 million. Wow just wow... CNN Breaking News https://www.cnn.com/2019/05/19/us/morehouse-robert-smith-student-loans-trnd/
  5. 4 points
    I am the same way. I typically try to merely express my opinion/views, not launch into outright disagreement, as though in a war. Additionally, if I have ever used that language (I disagree), it is not hard and fast disagreement. I am always open to discussing anything, regardless of my personal views. I know one fundamental thing, no human (including myself) knows everything. No human has a monopoly on truth. I try to carry a sense of humility around things/ideas/knowledge, as long as the thing isn't so overboard that it can do great harm. Then humility or not, I must do everything to stop the verbal harm being done. Generally, however, I will discourse to a point. If I see there is no balance, I stop talking.
  6. 3 points
    I appreciate you guys allowing me to become a part of this endeavor. I love my people and remain seriously concerned for our future. Here and in Africa.
  7. 3 points
    AAAAHHHHH! I LOVE CHERYL CROW! No you didn't!!! LOL. Man! That was so good! Such a release! Man! Thank you @Kareem @Maurice Thank you for posting. WHEW! WHEW! I LOVE THE BEATLES. Man! I could listend to 'Hey Jude' over and over and over... This has made my day!!! Lol! I ain't listening to no mo!--for now because I won't stop. I love CHIC and KC & the Sunshine Band. Man!
  8. 3 points
    This song and Baez's sound reminds me of Sheryl Crow, who I really like. I'll listen to more of Joan Baez based on your recommendation. There were a lot of folksy ladies like this in the early 1990s along with Sheryl Crow. The 10,000 Maniacs (Natalie Merchant) are also high on my early 90s favorites. Truth be told, one of my first girlfriends when I was very young was a white chick who played the violin. So 10,000 Maniacs kind of reminds me of that! But I've always loved the sound of violins and other string instruments (cello, viola, etc.). Nile Rodgers in the late 1970s used them all to perfection in his music, and it's always cute white chicks playing those violins and violas! Again there will never be another 70s or 80s. The talent to compose and perform the music, the love, the respect between black and white...all that cannot exist today...sadly. We tried so hard in the USA to fix racism in the 70s and 80s. The powers-that-be just didn't want that to happen. In sum...
  9. 3 points
    At the risk of 'jumping in', I'd like to welcome you back even though Ive only been a member for six months now. Greetings from South East England.
  10. 3 points
    I'm reading a few books but am primarily focused on Evil Never Sleeps: Tales of Light and Darkness, by Robert Fleming. Robert is one of America’s most accomplished writers. He has written poetry, novels, nonfiction articles, and has reviewed over 60 books for AALBC. His work spans over 40 years. It seems to me that writers like Robert should be better known, but he is just your run of the mill late-middle-aged Black man {yawn}. He’s not Caribbean or African, he’s not LGBT, he does not have a white parent, he can’t rap or dunk a basketball, he wasn’t gang banger or previously incarcerated. He is the kind of writer that I always complain about being ignored by the mainstream media. Robert's accomplishments will never go viral on twitter despite his significant contributions to our literature.
  11. 3 points
    @Pioneer1 You may be right. Black discussion forums are rapidly becoming a thing of the past. I revisited a post, not even two years old, where someone who ran a discussion forum ranked a few others. Half the forums have shut down -- including the one run by the person who made the post. Connie summed it up best she has more fun on Facebook. The part about typos on posts here, while true, is also true on facebook. That really is the bottom line. For the vast majority of social media users I observe in real life - who pass me their phone to share something funny they saw on some social site. Of course these sites are designed to highly engage folks and they work very well. Fast growing platforms like TikTok are completely driven by entertaining videos. Facebook's mobile feed attempts to mimic this but they can't... ultimately people will leave Facebook too. During the peak of this forum, I would regularly laugh out loud by something I read here, but I could also learn something. There was humourous posts, serious ones, and everything in between. Most importantly, at least to me, is that this platform is Black-owned and independent. I'm a child of the 60s, who grew up in the segregated northern ghetto of Harlem. So Black independence is a thing I find to be important. This is a sentiment that is dying along with indie Black focused and owned websites. One reason independence is important is that businesses like AALBC provides opportunities for people. The writers, editors, and others I pay are not being paid by the likes of a Mark Zuckerberg. Of course AALBC's ability to do this is adversely impacted the dominace of Google, Amazon, and social. Fortunately, individuals whether they are sponsors, site vistors, or contributors to this forum are the people who keep this site alive. If you are reading this thank YOU for helping to keep this site alive! Also, thank you on behalf of the writers whose work you support, but who will probably never fully appreciate your impact.
  12. 3 points
    This is the beginning of a new era for me on this site. I will TRY to be more understanding of other people's views and more appreciative of the knowledge and information other people are presenting. Some may ask what has caused me to seek a change in my demeanor. Well......Del, Troy, and Cynique have been advising me for quite some time to "expand" my thinking and not see things just from a narrow selfish perspective but it wasn't until I reviewed Mel's African American Culture thread....OVER AND OVER AGAIN....and how adamant I was in my error that I realized how embarassingly foolish and down right irritating it may have seemed to others. Another thing I noticed about my conduct was that as much as I liked people supporting my views and giving me positive "likes"..... I almost never did it for others. So as I've said I will try to be more appreciative and infact this appreciation will start with the owner and Moderator Troy. Thank you bro for providing me and others with a platform to express ourselves...the good and the bad...as well as a safe space for up and coming AfroAmerican authors to promote their talents and intellectual gifts.
  13. 3 points
    @TroyAn interesting explanation but not entirely on the mark. I don't know about Mel, but my always being in step with her is not because we are both females but because she a smart astute, insightful person who i find easy to side with because she makes sense and is amusing. I don't find any reason to oppose Chevedove, either, whether i disagree with her or not. She's full of documented information. I know very little about the subjects she posts and she educates me and doesn't have an arrogant bone in her body. i also felt this way about Chris Burns, who is a man. i am not a sensitive person and there is not a man on this board who could hurt my feelings because insults just roll off my back. I don't take myself that seriously. As for pioneer i couldn't care less whether he stays or goes. i'm not trying to run him away. i just don't feel like i have an obligation to like everybody. Some people are just the epitome of what turns me off and familiarity breeds contempt if you get my drift, but that's life. You and Del have areas of expertise that make you interesting people. A lot of what i say is off the top of my head. i have a store on knowledge in my mental files. Sometimes it's accurate, sometimes not. Whatever
  14. 3 points
    I am enjoying the renewed vigor of this battle... The I mean discussion.
  15. 3 points
    I dated a model for a few years when I was much younger. She was on the cover of magazines and the like. In her photo shoots she always wore a wigs. One magazine was a Black hair care magazine she was in the cover wearing a wig. I found this to be misleading, because the article covered hair care not wig wearing. I write all this to explain @Chevdove that I do not believe all women in the photos you posted are sporting their own natural hair. As a result, it is difficult to get into a discussion of this type if you don't believe the source information... But I get why women love to talk about this stuff. I presented at a Bloggers conference one. It was 90% women. Interestingly most wore their hair in what appeared to me to be natural styles, and many were quite attractive. To my disappointment about 1/3 of the Bloggers wrote about hair. There was this really popular Blogger they were all seemingly attempting to emulate, because they kept bringing her name up (I wish I could remember her name). At any rate, the whole event was boring to me -- thought the women seemed to enjoy themselves. I can't understand women's fixation with hair. I'm not passing judgment. I'm just making an observation. I don't get people obsession with baseball either. In every relationship I've been in my partner invested a lot of time, energy, money, and emotions over there hair. And boy, whenever I was asked how I thought their hair looked the answer must be "It looks great honey!" and I better say it, with feeling, like I mean it too :-)
  16. 3 points
    All of these observations are something i can relate to. Of late i am consumed by melancholy and jolted by the relentless thud of another one biting the dust. As A.E. Housman so succinctly put it; With rue my heart is laden, for golden friends i had, for many a rose-lipped maiden, and many a light-foot lad. By brooks too broad for leaping, the light-foot lads are laid, And the rose-lipped maids are sleeping in fields where roses fade...
  17. 3 points
    So young too... As I learned of Singleton's passing, my sister-in-law passed under similar circumstances. She too was what I consider young -- early 50s. A poker buddy passed a few weeks ago (early 60's). If seems the older I get the more people around me die. I heard Smokey Robin say, during the Sam Cooke documentary, that Aretha was his "oldest living friend." Of course she too is now dead... I hear one of the hardest things about growing old is losing family and friends. Life really is quite fleeting. I guess one of the advantages of growing old(er) is the realization almost nothing we stress over is not worth the energy. Live Long and Prosper Y'all 🖖🏾
  18. 3 points
    Me neither @Delano. Normally I would skip over stuff like this, but occasionally I'll check things just so that I'm not 100% out of the pop-culture loop. The headline I used for this post was the same one used by the Huntington Post -- another click-baity misleading head line they are prone to using. I wanted to see if it would attract more attention than other posts here (it did not). I'm curious to understand why Michelle produced a video to praise her friend -- when a call or text message to Beyonce would more than suffice. Is Michelle Obama no different than any of the other attention seeking social media junkies out there? My 20-something kid was in town this past weekend and we watched the Beyonce Chochella (sp?) convert documentary, for which Michelle Obama was praising Beyonce in the video above (@Chevdove) -- also something I would not normally do. It was a major production and I can only image how much money Beyonce made giving that performance. I have to say though I loved how she integrated the marching band into the performance -- but I love HBCU marching bands :-)
  19. 3 points
    You begin by using your imagination! Also, your brain has a delete button. But anyway, next don’t reinforce the “junk” messages. Remember the saying “let it go in one ear and out the other” It works. We seem to retain what we respond/react to. So whether you say “I hate this” or “I love that” you’re still giving it space. So be neutral and let it pass. Don’t build on it. Then just like a laxative, fill your mind with something foreign. Imagine things that send you on a scavenger hunt for more things you’ve never heard of. Today, I was writing a post for The Thriving Writer and I decided I needed 1 word to describe a concept... So I “bing-ed” it and found there is such a thing as a Enigmatologist. There’s only 1 who actually has a degree in puzzle creation and he created his own degree that was conferred upon him in 1974 from the University of Indiana. From my one small quest - I learned that It’s possible to create your own undergraduate degree in something like puzzlemaking AND allegedly be the only one in the world -to use it. He currently works at the New York Times as a crossword puzzle editor. That’s just a few examples - but thank you! You’ve given me a topic for next week’s blog post. Also refrain from “commentary”...instead take a concept in a whole new direction. For example; “The Bible is scientifically Accurate” Instead of commenting on the topic directly in an attempt to refute or cosign the claims - we expand the topic. For example we return to @Chevdove post where we began to speculate about quantum mechanics - time travel and the possiblity of passing through walls. This is how you perform a brain cleanse...😊
  20. 2 points
    I know I'm late to the party and y'all done ate up all the chips and dip and drank all the punch, too!! But, I thought I'd add a little something - and something quite different than most of what's been shared. I'm an older Brother, who digs a lot of what has been posted already, but a couple of friends (who don't know each other and have different tastes) have recently turned me on to some music that some here at AALBC might dig. First up, the 'British' (really Afro-Caribbean) saxophone player Shabaka and the Ancestors. Most of the band members are from South Africa and they are jamming. A brief introduction: This is one tune: https://youtu.be/TnkjcS_yTfA For a more extensive experience, here's their live performance from a couple years ago, which I really enjoyed. https://youtu.be/IU4vpE2eGho Damani
  21. 2 points
    @Mel Hopkins' post about the 1st African American, Kennedy Ryan, to win the Rita Award and how neither of us were previously aware of the author, who has previously published 16 books. It also got me thinking about the importance of the predominantly white institutions (PWI) relative to Black institutions and how they both relate to an author's notoriety and success. I did an event recently in which a panelist described knowing another author for years because they met on the "Chitlin' Circuit." I immediately knew what the Brother, author Brian Smith, was talking about because I've run into him on numerous stops on the "Circuit." The Chitlin' Circuit is the variety of Black run book events across the country that host Black authors. I don't particularly like the term because it marginalizes the events. It is also, I believe, why some Black authors don't participate in these events. Omar Tyree, Troy Johnson, Brian W. Smith, and Clarence Nero at the Bayou Soul Literary Conference around 2009 I doubt Ryan has done any events on the "Circuit," otherwise it would have been far more likely that I would have known who she was before she won the Rita Award. It is during "Circuit" events that I discover and connect with writers. Some very prominent authors, who have garnered acclaim by PWI's, fully embrace Chitlin' Circuit events. One author who immediately comes to mind is Walter Mosley. I give Mosley a lot of credit, because to this day he still does Black events; long after President Clinton told the world Mosley was his "favorite writer." Mosley still supports these events. In other words, Mosley no longer "needs" to do these events, but he recognizes by doing them he is benefiting the hosting organization, which is good for everyone. Kirkus Award winning author Jerry Craft, Troy Johnson, and Walter Mosley at the African American Literary Awards Show (2012) Most, if not all, of the Chitlin' Circuit events may be found on my events calendar. The Harlem Book Fair, in its prime a decade or more ago, was arguably the premier event on the circuit. Other events on the circuit include the National Black Book Festival in Houston, TX, the National Book Club Conference in Atlanta, GA, and the Leimert Park Book Festival in Los Angeles, CA. There are many many others. The one I attended most recently, featured author Brian Smith (mentioned above), was the Black Authors and Readers Rock event in Oxon Hill, MD. The calendar also contains events hosted by PWIs. I think it is important to do both types of events. Back in October Kirkus announced the winners of three $50,000 prizes (fiction, nonfiction, and childrens). All of the winners and more than half the finalists were Black. I thought this was astonishing. I also know several of this writers, personally -- from the "Circuit." The Kirkus Prize is relatively new and honestly I did not pay much attention to it. When it launched in 2014 only one Black writer was recognized a finalist, Dinaw Mengestu, an Ethiopian refugee living in Paris. PWIs, at that time, were really fixated with African writers. Interestingly, not one of the authors I know, who were recognized by Kirkus, told me about their honor. This is potentially life changing recognition. As a bookseller I'm actively seeking good books to share with readers. If I happen to actually know the writer I'm actually more excited to share the information with readers. I talked at length with a couple of these writers after learning about their honor. Initially I was told it was "on social media." However the conversations would have made a fascinating article. I wish I had the time and talent to write it. The issues were fascinating... but I digress. I guess all I'm trying to say to authors is that you can embrace Black events and platforms and still garner the acclaim of predominantly white institutions. It is not an either or proposition. You can and should do both types of events. When you do earn critical acclaim, please let us know directly; social media does not share everything equally and many of don't use it at all.
  22. 2 points
    Whether its ACA or otherwise, average white people's wealth almost doubled under Obama, and continues upward under Trump. Black people are still near ZERO today for wealth. Obviously being forced to pay for something when you have no money to begin with is a financial burden. White people gained more money under Obama, thus didn't take a hit being forced to buy insurance, which does nothing more than enrich the executives at Blue Cross/Blue Shield, Pfizer, Johnson & Johnson, etc.
  23. 2 points
    Right. All those 1s and 2s. Four, of course, is divisible by both. Spirituality is apparently quite numeric. Didn't think this thread would actually become this interesting.
  24. 2 points
    It's pretty clear that @azacotogan and @àgɛ̀lògbàgàn are the same person/persona since they like each other's own posts and both profiles were created in the last 4-5 days. Dude, just share info and be cool. Some of the stuff you post would be interesting if you weren't such a douche.
  25. 2 points
    Two years ago I was working with a law firm that took the case of a black woman imprisoned in Texas for debt (credit cards). The Eighth Amendment clearly states that cruel and unusual punishment includes "excessive bail" and "excessive fines." It essentially means you cannot go to jail over debt. I pulled some old state-level precedent in Texas affirming this position while writing her habeas corpus brief. She was released from jail after three months. We then sued the debt collector and the Harris County Sheriff's Office. The case settled out of court. Granted we strategically got the cases in front of sympathetic judges. So this won't work everywhere despite the law being pretty clear about debt and prison.
  26. 2 points
    Lol! Absolutely! Pittsburgh has made fine contributions to our literature. August Wilson's Century cycle and John Edgar Wideman. @Maurice with more regular contributors the forum will pick up. Sometimes I get a bit discouraged as maintenance is a chore and there of course is the expense, but i think the benefits still out weigh the downsides.
  27. 2 points
    This is the first time I've ever heard this song. It's a combination of gospel and blues, if that's really a distinction. Can't say I like it. This strikes me as field slave coping music! Granted we needed this back in the day. But it ain't groovy or nothing! 😀 I think the 80s was the most perfect age of music. I wish time stood still in that decade. It was the first decade of the 20th century without war or recession; and the music reflected that. Lots of fun, heartwarming, unity music from the 80s. But the 70s was the last decade for true black creative music, meaning when black people wrote, produced and performed MUSIC. Janice–Marie Johnson and Perry Kibble (Taste of Honey) are so sexy playing the guitar and bass guitar in "Boogie Oogie Oogie." I love disco and funk so much because they were so US...so groovy and so soul-cleansing. Black people writing, producing and creating music was the norm in the 1970s. We played and perfected every instrument. Rap and vocals overall took over music in the 1980s. @Maurice if you've never seen it, you will appreciate this Jimmy Hendrix interview on the Dick Cavett Show in 1969. We'll never see another Hendrix. We'll never see another 70s or 80s either. Both decades are essentially considered politically incorrect these days. All those 80s odes to women by men, and women singing odes to men will never happen again. This society doesn't want men loving women and women loving men anymore. Whitney Houston's first great song, "All At Once," didn't even chart in the USA in 1985. But itt was top 5 in Belgium, Italy and the Netherlands. I think this is Whitney's greatest song of all time! Don't get me going on music though! LOL!
  28. 2 points
    I just finished Genesis Starts Again. It is a novel written for preteens but I would absolutely recommend it to older readers and even adults. I currently rereading The Mis-Education of the Negro because if it actively speaks to our current predicament, I'm going to actively sell it in the real world. I'm also read The Famished Road as it generally regarded to be a great work of literature and I need to read some great literature now. I was pleased to discover my copy was signed to me by Ben Okri years ago (I'd forgotten 🙂)
  29. 2 points
    @Maurice Oh yes! Sometimes when I listen to some of that music, I feel as though I wish that time would just stand still... For me, that time period was like a golden age of music-- so free spirited.
  30. 2 points
    Hey @Marion Hill here is a link to all the event on the "Circuit" that I'm aware of: https://aalbc.com/events/list.php/ The list also includes the festivals of many types around the world, but you have no problem identifying the event on the "Circuit." 😉 @Mel Hopkins I'm unsure too, but perhaps you are right.
  31. 2 points
    @Mel Hopkins Yeah Living Single was one of the last network sitcoms that I regularly watched. Kim was certainly Black Famous back when the show aired. Do you think she is Black famous amongst millennials and younger? Eric Jerome Dickey is probably Black Famous amongst readers. Do you think he is Black famous amongst the Black general public? Do you think AALBC is Black famous within the the group of avid readers who are also active online? Sometimes I'll run into a Black author who is promoting a book and says they are unfamiliar with my website and I'll joking say something like, "well you must not use the world wide web?" Sometimes that is actually the case, usually with an older person. Other times it is a combination of how the person used the web and how they web actually works. People tend to gravitate to the biggest websites and everything on the web serves to elevate the biggest sites. You need the white co-sign to become famous. Increasingly however -- especially on the web you need the white co-sign to become "Black famous." The celebs of "Black Twitter" would, of course, not be possible without Twitter. The same could reasonably be said for the start of Black Lives Matter. Black Chitlin' Circuit events for books makes it possible for writers to become Black Famous. Without these events it would be very difficult for a writer to have a career based solely upon writing. These events help raise the profile of AALBC -- which is why I do these events. That plus I love being around Black folk who have a passion for stories and knowledge.
  32. 2 points
    The Kirkus Prize is one of the richest literary awards in the world, with a prize of $50,000 bestowed annually to authors of fiction, nonfiction, and young readers’ literature. There are 5 finalists in each category, 8 Black writers made up more than half of all the finalists and won every category! This is quite an accomplishment. When the award started in 2014 there was only one Black finalist and no winners.* *This is based upon recent research; if someone finds something that is factually inaccurate please let me know.
  33. 2 points
    News roundup for bloggers - Genius Media Group, Inc, the company behind the annotated lyrics website, is suing Google and Lyric Find for $50 million. The complaint mentions copying lyrics from the site and using it on the results page. Here's a link to the Brooklyn based media company's complaint filed December 03, 2019, in Brooklyn Supreme Court of New York State County of Kings https://iapps.courts.state.ny.us/nyscef/ViewDocument?docIndex=3E0o8kQz4X3cWcbbid67wQ== Several news sites report Internet Society (ISOC)'s Public Interest Registry, a nonprofit, sold the top-level domain dot-org registry. The winning bidder is a private equity firm Ethos Capital. Allegedly, the dot-org registry is Ethos Capital only asset, but their website ethoscapital.com indicates otherwise. In July this year, ICANN, the nonprofit responsible keeping all things equal and equitable in the domain registrar world, also voted to lift the cap on registration fees. According to news reports, there will be no registration fee hikes. Still, your dot-org registration fees could go up and become cost-prohibitive. Sadly, nonprofits mostly use the dot org extension for their organizations' websites. And other online nonprofit news media websites containing a treasure trove of information also use the dot-org extension. Should those websites not be able to pay the domain registration fee - that information might disappear. If you're a dot org registrant, you might want to secure registration for the ten years to keep your domain name. At least it will buy you some time while these things shake out.
  34. 2 points
    I know I've mentioned this several times. But white imperial society rewards coonery and acquiescence. This woman is being rewarded by white liberals for her promotion of homophilia among black people. I'd also like to point out that Botham Jean's brother, the coon who hugged the white killer cop in court, was rewarded by white conservatives this week when he received an "Ethical Courage Reward" from a Texas police union. Crazy living in this world.
  35. 2 points
    Curves touched pressed into mine, your hand slowly moving along the arch of my spine. A tiny gap appears between my thighs, a twist of my lips; it is a glimpse of moments that have you asking why. A pair of large breast pointed up toward the sky, silk wrapped mounds are the reflection of my hips in your eyes. Caressing the back of the neck, the tasting of earlobes are a thought to reflect. Exploring the essence of the whine as it create its own lyrics begging to not be alone, Tongues intertwine to dance in one place as your hand venture into my secret space where the tune of my movements are as whimpers in the dark where the shadow of the moon tap the clit and the heart. Climactic explosions of melodies made are the twirling of two areolas as the nipples displayed. Pulling up on the waist as the body collides. The flinch to the jerk is the strike of ecstasy’s mind. then the spirit so provoked as to spin in space and the mind body and soul race back to that place where delights has them all begging for more. Yet, the thoughts of the moment repeating its self keeps them unsure. Did it happen? Was this foreplay real? Did you make love to my mind? it was so surreal. This was my thoughts at just hello, makes a girl step back to consider for him how far she will go. You had me at hello.
  36. 2 points
    Maurice I hear you...... I'm not sure about the laws in Romania but I'm a supporter of free speech. As long as you aren't calling for somone's harm or exposiong personal information about them like thier address or phone number.....I say you should speak your mind. Is it wrong? Ofcourse. But when you start punishing people for what they say it's becomes a slipperly slope. And ofcourse the station should have the right to fire that individual if they choose without the government forcing them to keep him or let him go. I say fight fire with fire. Serena should be allowed to go on a Romanian radio show and use some of the skills she learned growing up in "Da CPT" to roast his ass....lol.
  37. 2 points
    I wish I could disagree with this, but I cannot. I will qualify my position with the fact that black people succeeded in building our own cities in the 1910s and 1920s, only for white people to destroy them. Black Wall Street (Tulsa, OK) gets most of the press in this regard. Rosewood, East St. Louis, Omaha, Kirven, TX...there were probably 100 cities/neighborhoods that former slaves built from the ground up from 1870-1930, only to have them destroyed in "race riots," meaning feral, jealous white people torching and looting the cities, and killing thousands of the ancestors. I think after that, ADOS collectively gave up. We're damned if we do, damned if we don't. But nothing you said is inaccurate. Its the main reason I don't watch TV and movies. I just can't stand seeing black people as willing, bojangling coons. This is very important. I've argued with many brothers and sisters that we were FAR better off before so-called "integration." The statistics don't lie. 89% of black babies were born to their married mom and dad in the 1960s. Black business ownership (meaning businesses that creates jobs in black communities and had black patrons) peaked in 1963. There were fewer than 150,000 black people in prison/jail in 1960. Today there are over 2 million. The most chilling stat of today - 80%+ of black babies in the USA are born to a single mom. Instead of improving ourselves, we pick a master (liberals or the Trumps) and try to be the best slave possible. That means alphabet-cooning for liberals and shoulder-monkey-cooning for Trump. Those who don't succeed at one of those end up in prison and drinking 40s in front of the liquor store. The remaining 20-25% (you, I, Troy, Chev, etc.) are going to be extinct by 2050. I've maintained that forever. The black man and woman in the USA will not exist in 30 years. This was the white imperial plan since 1619 and its come to fruition. Troy mentioned how I'm out of the loop for not knowing what Wakada is. I don't know anything about any of these rappers today; couldn't name one song by any of them. When Nipsey Hussle (sp?) died, that's the first time I heard of him. A lot of black folks seem to respect him. I'm curious of your opinion of him? I NEVER understood the obsession with 2Pac. I mean, he's a typical nigga to me. Rappers like KRS-One, X-Clan, Chuck D/Public Enemy, Paris, etc. were who got me into rap. I mean, I'd listen to Sir Mix-A-Lot, Too Short and other stuff because I'd hear it played around the house. You also notice how disco was the last CREATIVE genre of black music...where we actually played instrument and MADE music? Today disco is clowned as some circus act. They made stop MAKING music and created "rap" where you sample other people's music and talk over it. They even steal our creativity. You are absolutely right re: hood movies. Seriously, all these black filmmakers can't come up with black love stories, business stories, intelligent comedies, etc.? Hell, when I first saw Boyz in the Hood and Menace 2 Society, that shit shocked me. I'd never seen anything like that in real life. When I started trying to "talk black" after seeing those films as a kid, my dad and uncles beat my ass! This is true. But we know its coming. Bottomline is that we're still trying to impress a master, whether its liberals (probably 60% of ADOS) or Trump (probably 15% of ADOS). We've been conditioned to beg them for paychecks, for dignity, for respect, etc. We have no way to counter it. The most powerful black people in America are pushing white agendas. I'm going to be so sad when Minister Farrakhan passes away. He's the last of the true black power movement. the destruction of black America will accelerate quickly thereafter. That and the fake preachers like Creflo Dollar, Sharpton and Jakes will keep flying around in private jets preaching fear and submissiveness to poor black folks. Now I'm feeling depressed!
  38. 2 points
    I actually attended Quincy Troupe's reading on Tuesday. It actually was an interesting event in park... Well it is not really a "park" in the sense anyone outside of NYC would think of one, but it is an oasis a break from the density popular concrete that surrounds. The park is near iconic FlatIron building (the former home of St. Martin's Press) and very close to where I teach Baruch College (which is why I went).
  39. 2 points
    Toni Morrison lived to be 88. She had a tremendously successful and, I trust happy, life. Today I received a lot of email from friends informing me of Morrison's passing describing it as "sad" and even "horrible." I understand the permanent loss of anyone, especially someone so talented, is sad, but Morrison's transition is the culmination of a life well lived, a life worth celebrating. We all should be so blessed. R.I.P. Toni Morrison
  40. 2 points
    Go Tell it on the Mountain by James Baldwin Fledgling by Octavia Butler Go Tell it on the Mountain by James Baldwin Fledgling by Octavia Butler
  41. 2 points
    @Chevdove yes you can! All day erry day! You got this!!! I didn't see this one! Thank you for the heads-Up 🤣 @Pioneer1 I already failed at the gig because I agreed with you! Plus sorry, men are men... and although there is this one light skinned hazel-eyed brother that I'm crushing on - he scares me speechless so there's that - ok TMI TMI ... No, I already have a club here at AALBC that Troy, appointed me moderator and I'm working on getting folks to contribute there at readingblack.com ... So y'all come on over!!!
  42. 2 points
    Black. Graduates. ,Who. Graduates. High. School. And. College,Congratulations.. May. You. Reach. Your. Ambitions,Dreams,And. Desires. As. Racist. White. Create. Plots,Schemes To. Stop You. News Says. ,Black , Billionaire,Paying,The College , Debt. Of Morehouse. ,Graduates...Churches Could Do That ,If Preacher's We're ,Not,Stealing Millions Of Dollars... Democrats Talk Of Equal. Pay,. Men Make. More Than Women. White Women Make. More , Than,Black And Hispanic. Women. Sure,White. Men. Makes. More,Than. Others. Doing. The. Same. Job.. Congratulations. ,To,Children. Of. AALBC. Members,Who. Finished. High. School. Or,College....
  43. 2 points
    @Pioneer1 I don't think anyone would dispute that the Caribbean makes up part of the Americas the north or south american continental plate (or whatever the correct tecnical term is). However, when you wrote, "Both Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic are part of AMERICA just like Jamaica, Haiti, Mexico, ect...," you were unclear because when people say "America" they are normally referring to the U.S. of A., not the Caribbean, Canada, or North America. "I rule in favor of the ladies, case closed." I slam down the gavel and rise to retire to my chambers.
  44. 2 points
    Noone invented it. It was created. Bam!
  45. 2 points
    Instead of making snit up you could use the internet. Here's a newsflash I was there and I also look things up. Since my experience is only a part. But I am not suggesting that you think critically or conceptually.
  46. 2 points
    "I stand alone on a pedestal and even betta still my mic is hyper than hype if you like I'll take you to a level of heights domain where I dwell excel, drive you all insane cause no man or band or clan can rock fans or stand beside MCM 'cause I am the incredible, unforgettable, A capella dwella like Spinderella, I''m not a fella but Imma ass-kickin' hellafied microphone high take it to heart when I start to perform, I can knock a brother's rep down, make em wanna step down … even a cutie is bootie cause he slept now" ~ I do Damage @Delano you're right! Good Ear!!!. That was shaping up to be a rap battle! This is a verse from my past. Like you mentioned in the African American Culture thread "call and response" is our from our culture as Is "the dozens" much of which dates back to GRIOTS from West Africa.
  47. 2 points
    @Mel Hopkins I'm real careful what is on my phone (though I downed this image so that I may share it here), because I'm always giving it to people to look at images on it and you know how nosy people can get. Still I would not expect Instagram to send you an image like this. But for a single, sexually active, man like myself -- Facebook/Instagram knows what will pique my interest As you know you do not have to have accounts on these systems in order for them to monitor and manipulate you.
  48. 2 points
    Funny @Chevdove I'd not considered the reason to be as simple as vanity -- maybe you are correct. Sure this is not only a Black woman's problem. I Image hair care is a multi-billion dollar industry. I don't doubt having someone else pamper you by washing your hair, massaging you, and even listen to you talk about your problems feels good. These are all qualities I'd desire (require) in a life partner :-)
  49. 2 points
    {Looking around like the last guy on Earth surveying his surroundings after a nuclear holocaust or the Rapture.} Since @harry brown has posted recently, I presume the site is not broken. Indeed, in the time that it took me to write this 16 people have visited this forum: I guess the period between Palm Sunday and Easter is really slow around here. Maybe everyone is on spring break (actually mine starts Friday). Or maybe, more ominously, social media's domination and control over the online conversation is now complete. Does that mean I can't communicate with my people unless I go to Facebook... Lawd help me!
  50. 2 points
    The Universe seems to be in some kind of a transition. The unexpected is intruding itself upon the world. That's why Trump is successfully polluting the atmosphere and America is being drawn into a vortex of change. There's no contrived conspiracy; just occurrences following a course. No right or wrong; only opposites. Life is inexorably unfolding, and things are shifting because change is inevitable, Here on earth change is aided and abetted by the lure of computerized technology. I don't think Mankind has any control over how society is evolving. It's simply being swept along. I, myself, am caught up in a sphere where everything is out of kilter. It's like unseen forces are toying with me. As an example, Mel's on point response to the above posts by Troy and "non American black man", has disappeared...
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