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  1. 4 points
    O black woman, do you know who you are? It is you for whom the birds sing when the dawn opens itself for inspection. It is the glow in your eyes that the stars imitate when they sparkle. It is the color of your flava that makes the rainbow dull in comparison, and it is via your beauty that we can physically witness God’s artistry.-Gibran-• O black woman, do you know who you are? You are the secret that only reveals itself when a man is truly ready to experience the joy of having his dream transformed into reality. You are God’s private blessing to men who know what to do within the point between birth and death. To dwell within the kingdom of YOU is where heaven begins. -Gibran- • O black woman, do you know who you are? You are both the starting point and the finish line for everything I could ever aspire to be. You are a force of nature that has broken my shackles so that I can walk freely. You have erased my doubts so that I can think clearly. You have repaired my broken wings so that I can soar beside you. -Gibran- • O black woman, do you know who you are? You are the magic that awes the universe, the splendor that amazes the earth, and the glory that makes men heart beat with pride when they attempt to possess u. -Gibran- • O black woman, do you know who you are? You are the beautiful gift that God left on the doorstep of my heart. You are that special moment in time when nothing else matters but most importantly, you are YOU! Unmistakably YOU! -Gibran- • O black woman, do you know who you are? You are the sunshine that lights my life from within. You are the fire that warms every fiber of my being and that illuminates my path so that I am never afraid of the darkness. -Gibran- • O black woman, did u know that when I stare in the skies the stars spell your name? I feel your touch in the wind and I see your face in the clouds. And when I stand under the shadow of your smile, I find shelter from the storm. -Gibran- • O black woman, do you know who you are? You are that warm safe place where all roads lead at the end of a day when I have slayed all my dragons and find that all of my strength comes from you. You melt on my life and I become complete. -Gibran- • O black woman, do you know who u are? You are chocolate, dipped in mystery, a specially-designed flava whose smile is brighter than the rainbow. -Gibran-
  2. 3 points
    Well, we were acquaintances, not friends since we did not run in the same circles because she was, as we used to call them, "sanctified", a member of the Church of God in Christ which back then forbade its women to wear lipstick, and frowned on drinking and smoking and dancing and playing cards. So her life was pretty much what it would've been had she been raised as a member of the NOI. Her name was Beatrice and she was an attractive girl and a choir soloist with a beautiful singing voice and a pleasant personality and was cherished by the congregation of her father's church. But her life took a detour when she was not only whispered about for being a daughter of Elijah Muhammad, - something that didn't come out until we were in our 20s when the black Muslims had become well known - but for what happened later when she again became the subject of more gossip after she was left "standing at the altar" in her white wedding gown because the groom never showed up for the rumored reason of being gay. She never wed and became an evangelist and died young, in her early 50s. i have no idea how she felt about the circumstances of her birth but she did have kind, loving adopted parents. There were a lot of little interesting back stories and skeletons in the closet among the black population in the small town where i grew up...
  3. 3 points
    Discovering that Elijah Muhammad had a harem of young girls, many of whom he impregnated, was what drove Malcolm to leave the NOI and start his own sect. I personally knew a girl in my hometown who was fathered by Elijah Muhammad and was later adopted by a local minister of the Church of God and Christ, and his wife. Also, according to Malcolm's biography by Alex Haley, Malcolm was a pimp in his days before he went to prison and converted to Islam. Of course, Alex has proved to not always tell the truth in his books. Recently there have been reports that in 2010 Farrakhan became interested in Scientology and began to explore its concepts and encourage followers to study the disciplines of Dianetics in order to become coverts and learn the "auditing" procedures utilized to recruit and monitor others. i also read where Farrakhan has converted to Christianity, accepting Jesus Christ as his savior. I read about the Muslims and Dianetics in Wikipedia, which of course, draws criticism from certain people on this board. But i have always found well researched information there, and since the living people and the heirs of the dead people it profiles have an option to challenge and correct information about themselves or their works, i assume that what i read there is as good a source as any for information. As far as what i believe about black men automatically defending their women, i don't think doing so is a priority of theirs or something they do as a custom. Individual ones may do so in the course of protecting their families, the same way they would do if it came to their car or any property they valued. It's not something i dwell on. i remember a while back when one night my husband and i were awakened by a noise that made him wonder if someone was trying to break in. He immediately got up with the intention to go down stairs and see. i protested, asking him what did he think he could do? He continued out the room, saying he didn't know but would think of something when he got there. While i had my hand on the phone, i think he grabbed an object before he made it down the stairs where it proved to be a false alarm. So i guess "situational ethics" can trigger impulses. 😏
  4. 3 points
    DUH. i think your response was highly opinionated. But not the expression of a self-centered person. What i said about me being self-centered was that i thought this was how others viewed me. i don't view myself as self-centered however because i am too busy focusing on contradicting what others say. So i guess that kind of ties in with Troy said. Note that i never bother to capitalize "i" when it stands alone and this is for a reason... Once again i have a confession to make. i didn't join this thread until late because sometimes i stay on the sideline and just let others go at it, especially when it involves videos because as i've gotten older my attention span is short, and both spoken and written comments have to instantly grab me or i lose interest. So, when Del asked my opinion on black women marrying white men and Chevdove shared her thoughts on the exchange between Malcolm and Evie, i back tracked and checked things out closer, which is to say i actually watched the video. And it was, indeed, like going back in time. In 1961, i was 28 years old and immersed in the blooming civil rights struggle. This was during Martin's and Malcolm's hey day, their friendly rivalry kinda like a Michael and Prince thing; different sides of the black coin, one edgy, the other smooth. This was also when TV had really come into its own having just started to command a wide audience in the mid 1950s. So "M"&"M" were superstars, thanks to the exposure granted them by the MEDIA of TV as well as talk-radio which was also an up and coming outlet. The thing about what they were both saying back then was although it was revelatory to white people, it was familiar to blacks, and when these 2 started spreading their messages, black folks immediately identified with them. They weren't saying "Oh, Wow", they were nodding "Right On". The things Malcolm was saying about whites i had grown up hearing to my daddy say, something that was common in all black families who lived in a racist society. i never had any illusions about the guilt of whites but my particular environment also enabled me to see benefits of what Martin was saying about integration. As soon as i heard Malcolm's resonate voice on the video, telling it like it was in response to the shrill, high-pitched enunciations of Evie, the years fell away. Now, as then, i have mixed emotions, - which is what it means to be black in America...
  5. 3 points
    Hmh.......... Let me see .......... When my high school history teacher and football coach seemed to turn up in places when I got off the city bus in big ole San Diego, way on the other side of the city ....... there he was in his van------ offering me a ride...... when he told me I had to do after school study or I'd fail and could not graduate, and even though I took my friend with me..... he demanded that she leave because she was passing and then, she left....... he pressed against me..... i was 16 years old..... a virgin...... and I beg him to get off of me..... and later find out that he did this before and was basically just 'slapped on the hand' and sent to another school......my school.... to do it again!!! Fortunately, he did not continue and he did leave me alone that day.... or 9 months later, I would have had a half White-Italian baby. I was terrified. I did not like it at all. I felt like Kizzie..... as this was the rage during that time. Yes, I do find assertive men attractive, but not creeps. In college, too, and like this situation, there are many creeps. But to do this to ARiande Grande on such an occasion, is unbelievable. Come on, @Pioneer1 on national television! Yes! That is awful. Did you see how he was holding her? That was just ridiculous. Is he married? If he is, then how would you expect his wife to respond. I would completely flip out.
  6. 3 points
    @Troy Join Tiger Woods and Jim Brown who both just said Trump was being unfairly treated by the media who doesn't respect the office of president, and pounces on his every word, constantly criticizing him. BooHoo. I've predicted that 45 will pick up more and more support because everybody has a gripe and he will eventually get around to bitching about one that matches up with one shared by someone who doesn't like him. Multiply this by a thousand and the numbers will groooooow. i give up. Let the chips fall where they may.
  7. 3 points
    @ChevdoveI'm trying to figure out why this conversation is necessary. i have on numerous occasions expressed a disinterest in Africa and on other occasions kidded about my RH negative blood. You seemed to have taken my latest musings on this subject personal, and pioneer, who is one of my least favorite people in the world, decided to inject his obnoxious self into the proceedings doing what he does best which is to spout his made-up versions of things, - lies that are rarely grounded in truth or fact. But, rest assured that you can agree with him to your heart's content, because i couldn't care less, contrary to what he imagines. This site needs all the contributors it can attract and other people's approval is not required when it comes to posting things. I'm glad when you and Mel come aboard because you both always have input of substance. So keep on doing what you do, You're a welcome addition to this board. And thank you for your kind words.
  8. 3 points
    I would argue that the work had two protagonists: Hurston herself because of her goal to keep Kossola talking and thereby transcribe his life to text, and the other being Kossola because the text was his story, and wow, what a story. There was so much grief in such a small work – loss of family, loss of community, loss of health, and the loss home. And equally as painful as the grief was Kossala’s remembering the part Africans / Dahomey played in the slave trade. Kossala’s goal was to stay alive, and his antagonist was the Peculiar Institution of American Slavery with its long reaching and lasting tentacles of racism. He was kidnapped, placed in a barracoon, a slave ship, and on an auction block (all life threatening situations) due to American slavery. I believe, the establishment of Africatown, was his strongest blow against the reaching effects of slavery; freed slaves reestablished an African community on hostile American soil; that was miraculous. Kossala didn’t die due to slavery, but he suffered during and after; the lashes of racism ripped at his spirit and his body most of his life. Kossala was never able to return to Africa, and this denial was directly linked to slavery’s tentacles. The main message the text left me with – was that culture was king. Kossala’s culture was his strongest and consistent weapon. He relied on his culture and African traditions his entire life: in the bowels of the slave ship, he and the other kidnapped youth cried through traditional songs to ease their burden, as soon as he and other recently kidnapped Africans were freed they danced a traditional dance, throughout his youth and senior days African parables and fables guided his actions. When his family was taken, his culture remained; he took on the traditional role as griot for Africatown before the loss of family and remained in the role after the loss as an elder. Motifs in the text included valuing family, adapting to change, self-sufficiency, and surviving despite oppression. The text was loaded with descriptive language but what remained me was Kossala calling his wife his eyes, and when he lost her/then he was finished. The most memorable scene was the image of the Dahomey attacking his village; woman warriors entering the village beheading elders while the men blocked the exits kidnapping those who tried to escape the carnage. I believe the work will become one of the most important slave narratives in the canon. Hurston brought the skill of a fiction writer to the task of recording a biography; she converted Kossala’s biography into a story. In addition, Plant’s editing is informational and instructional. I will continue to read both writers. https://ndigo.com/2018/06/27/barracoon-wakeup-reading-paul-king/
  9. 2 points
    @Mel Hopkins Will do! @Troy This would help me.
  10. 2 points
    Del It just occured to me that this "new era" or change in my attitude has occured one day AFTER the May 17th date you made mention of.
  11. 2 points
    @Delano perhaps your knowledge of astrology can be of use here. I think when planet go retrograde they appear to stop for a moment before seemingly reversing direction. all planet move in the sky. stars appear fixed relative to each other. This @Pioneer1 is why you can determine when something took place. I believe the age of pisces corresponded with Jesust the Christ's birth for example, which is why Christians drive around with the fish symbol on their cars. I remember pointing out Venus to a sister in the night sky. She was surprised. In fact I doubt she believed me. You can see several planets with the naked eye. Most people mistake planets for stars.
  12. 2 points
    {Looking around like the last guy on Earth surveying his surroundings after a nuclear holocaust or the Rapture.} Since @harry brown has posted recently, I presume the site is not broken. Indeed, in the time that it took me to write this 16 people have visited this forum: I guess the period between Palm Sunday and Easter is really slow around here. Maybe everyone is on spring break (actually mine starts Friday). Or maybe, more ominously, social media's domination and control over the online conversation is now complete. Does that mean I can't communicate with my people unless I go to Facebook... Lawd help me!
  13. 2 points
    @Pioneer1 you've missed the point. Don't you see that the video I shared is part of a strategy to get a wage increase? You are speaking as if the professors are complete morons without agency. In the short time I've been teaching my wages have increased twice once retroactively resulting in a 4 figure check. Not a ton of money, but what i make working part time, from home, is the more than what some wage earners make working full time. The adjuncts are unionized. I posted the video because the claim we make poverty wages is hyperbolic and I thought it might be interesting to share my story of poverty 🙂 Look, no one will get rich being adjunct, but poverty is a bit extreme. Again, it is a part time job and if it is your only source of income, living in NYC, then yeah, you are in for a world of hurt.... Of course I also feel more resources should be directed to education.
  14. 2 points
    I feel that two things are essential being able to see and changing your mind
  15. 2 points
    This is powerful! We do protect a black man’s image, don’t we? I think this is why so many are having a negative reaction to the R Kelly saga... Black women have covered black men for so long - that many (mostly men but women too) are shocked that a black woman produced and directed the film that gave his alleged victims a platform. Many black women have normalized the horrible treatment they’ve receive at the hands of black men, they call men “soft” who treat them well. Go on social media and you’ll see some black men say they are supposed to be “Future” to their “Ciara”. Instead of being kind to their woman; as Ciara’s husband “Russell” is to her. Those are the same black men who believe Ciara will tire of how well her husband treats her and her son with Future and she’ll come crawling back to Future. That’s how brain damaged some of young black men (and black women) are today. But I digress. I know some of my experiences with black men aren’t for publication either. And I can tell you, it’s those stories that haunt me; making it difficult to finish my second book. Some times, I tell myself that I’m being too sensitive or maybe I deserved it - but then I realize that is exactly how battered women rationalize their relationship experiences. So, yes I’ve been sorely disrespected by many black men. None of it deserved. But those experiences afforded me a lot of painful life lessons too. And now I know what it is like to experience kindness. Yet, I absolutely understand your position.
  16. 2 points
    Don't worry @Cynique things are looking up, GOT kicks off next month! @Delano I believe I corrected problem where text on the buttons were hidden. I just installed a patch that clad things up).
  17. 2 points
    Lol! Yo @Pioneer1 you gonna let him punk you like Dat?! Just playing but it was funny though... Y'all think we can elevate the conversation reminds me of Facebook 😉
  18. 2 points
    @Chevdove, interesting! Thank you for that perspective! Yes electromagnetic radiation (see electromagnetic spectrum: for more on light wavelengths) must pass through matter to capture the image of the skeleton! Yet, our crude method of this concept (x-rays) can cause cell damage leading to cancer. My dentist took extra precaution to protect mt thyroid when I worked as a flight attendant - he said i was already getting a large dose of radiation flying the friendly skies lol! This also reminds me of a documentary I watched where some biologists observed that fasting from food for several days even a week - causes the cells to change its structuee to protect from radiation damage ... after a observing the outcome on many patients they concluded the cells changes was a throwback from when we didn’t EAT all the dang time! It allowed us to survive with little food. The thing is it didn’t turn off - so today some believe our diseases are due to not periodically fasting for a few weeks - even a few days lol. But I digress. I also remembered from scripture, Jesus, as a human, did a lot of fasting... So maybe, he knew who to rearrange his physical make-up to move through matter without damaging his body’s building blocks (atoms/adam) smile... Thank you for sharing thought-provoking concepts! I see you have a book & blog in you! Have you ever thought about using the aalbc blog feature too!
  19. 2 points
    LIke I said, she was referring to her husband, . . . who chose her! That's her personal choice. But I understand that you are saying that she picked him because he was White. @Pioneer1 I feel that you are cherry picking. You are ignoring her statements in how she had bad relationships with previous men, that were Black. Now, I am going to read into this statement, because I can relate, as a BLack woman; I feel that I know where she is coming from, in that in many cases, Black men do not respect Black women, and that is putting it mildly!!! I don't understand why you are conveniently ignoring this truth!!! But as for me, yes, I have found a BLack man that, though not perfect in the beginning, but adores me, is kind to me, and etc. I have had many positive relationships with Black men and so, I personally, made a hard decision that I wanted to marry a Black AFrican-typed man or else, I was simply not going to get married. But, I tell you, I see several Black women married to White and other men, and they are a match, for certain. @Pioneer1 Well, I have to say, that when I hear Black men justify Black women, negatively as the reason they want White women, I do NOT like it at all. But, I would never attack someone personally, who has stated that he had bad relationships, was treated badly, and etc. This too, is true, IMO. There are some Black women that behave very disrespectful to Black men. I makes me cringe. Oh but yes you are. You are putting this label on her, IMO.
  20. 2 points
    Yeah I hear you @Cynique, but Steve Harvey is not any funnier than Monique. Sucess is never really is about pure talent in the entertainment industry. Do you think the striper turn rap phenom, Cardi B, is the most talented female rapper? Do you think Colin K. lacks the talent to make a pro team? Steve is great at working the system, Monique despite the Oscar sucks at it. It was probably not a good idea for her to be managed by her husband. That has obviously not worked well....
  21. 2 points
    @Pioneer1 @NubianFellow Talking about someone’s appearance makes $$$ millions for Wendy Williams and her talk show but that’s cheap entertainment. Nagging about another’s appearance, which gay men have turned into an art form, is a weak and ineffective showing of black masculinity. In fact, when I was growing up in Brooklyn - dudes called that a “bitch” move. An actual sign of Black masculinity would reflect first in a man having control over himself, and then working to better his physical environment. And that’s the bare minimum.
  22. 2 points
    It is in Pioneerville, a place that he founded and is located inside his skull.
  23. 2 points
    Yes. If you make an objective judgment, not a moral one. Look for parallels in nature among the animal kingdom. Superiority is what it is.. What escapes me is why black men can't figure out that sistas are not preoccupied with the origins and implications of their hair style. They have more important things to worry about. i think Nubian Fellow is entitled to his opinion and his determination to bring about change is a sincere one. Nobody will be the worst for wear if he succeeds. @ time-honored artifacts of black America's rich culture.
  24. 2 points
    I started off my career as a father by going to jail on the very same night that my first child was born. It was on a hot, steamy August night in 1972. I was minding my own business , sitting on the sidelines of a neighborhood football game where I was supposed to be playing; a star wide receiver, who was so high on heroin, I was banned from playing. Well, I actually didn’t care because I would rather nod than catch passes. Plus, I never truly believed that the team I played for from Piedmont Courts could beat the North Charlotte Bears, the team my oldest sister's brother, Buddy, played for. In fact, my "brother" played on the same high school team with Dwight Clark, who later became famous for catching the winning pass from Joe Montana in a SuperBowl. Nonetheless, at some point during the game, but shortly before half-time, My girlfriend’s youngest brother, came flying out of the darkness on his bike, yelling that I should get to the hospital right away. Without even giving that ominous announcement any real thought, I knew precisely what it meant, and what it signified more than anything else was that my life had just changed dramatically! In addition to all the things I already was at nineteen years old, I was about to earn another label to my pedigree: DADDY! At nineteen, I was black, poor, a high-school dropout, unemployed, and an ex-convict. Unfazed by my unfortunate credentials, I was not exactly certain if fatherhood would be a cure or a curse. Either way, the moment was now upon me. Within a matter of seconds, I had a ride, and a carload of us departed Alexander Street Park, headed to Charlotte Memorial Hospital to help me usher my brand new child into America. I went to jail because while on the way to the hospital to greet the birth of my daughter, I decided to have my friend to pull over at a corner grocery store in the hood to buy some cigars. After all, in all the movies I had ever seen, that’s what men did. They bought and passed out cigars to their friends to celebrate the birth of their newborn child. Maybe, I shouldn’t have stopped. However, I did. As luck would have it, even though I was only in the store a very short time, it was more than enough time for the police to harass my friends. Seeing the predicament as a case of police brutality, I rushed out of store on Parkwood Avenue, and over to the car where I proceeded to tell the police that “I knew the law” and that it would be best for them if they just left us alone. In a world of justice and equality, that very well should have marked the end of the whole affair, but it didn’t. In fact, the police seemed angered by my boldness and proceeded to club the shit out of me. After a brief but violent confrontation, I was carted off to jail, pitched into the drunk tank with all the other inebriated folks, and charged with disorderly conduct. In the drunk tank, there were no beds so everyone had to sleep on the cold, concrete floor. They didn’t give you any food. They didn’t give you any sheets or blankets. In fact, they didn’t give you shit, but it was peaceful and serene in a haunted house sort of way; a cell filled with drunken strangers snoring and passing gas without shame or regret. Now, decades later, upon reflection, I guess this was a classic example of how drugs warp your mind because what in the hell was comforting about being locked up in a cage that reeked of vomit and bad breath. Anyway ,the next morning I was taken before the Judge who released me once I explained my situation and recounted the birth of my first-born child, but somehow I knew that I had missed a very important moment in the life of my little girl .Embarrassed that I had not been there to see my daughter the night before, I postponed going to visit her until a few days later. That turned out to be a tragic blunder. By some cruel twist of fate, It was around this time in 1972 that I embarked on a bank-robbing spree, and before my baby could celebrate her first birthday, I was locked away in federal prison with 30 years. I would be gone for 10. Once released, I remember how nervous I was when I went to visit my daughter. I searched my mind for something that would allow me to make a good first impression on a little girl who knew more about the visiting hours in jail than she knew about what time Sesame Street came on. This child of mine had probably seen the insides of more prisons than she had classrooms, and it had always pained me to think how my daughter must have hated me on those ever-occurring days in school when the students had to stand before the class and announce just what it was that their fathers did for a living. Even though some of the other students may have had a dad that was a garbage-man or one who worked in a fish market, my daughter was probably the only child who on “Career Day” had a dad who was locked up. Wow, that must have been traumatizing. Anyway, on the night of my tenth year of being missing in action from my daughter’s life, I stood in the darkness outside the house when she lived with her mother, afraid. If this would have been the home of one of my partners, I would have strolled into the house and would have been given a hero’s welcome. After all, here I was, a young nigga, who had just spent a whole decade in the joint, taking everything the white man had thrown at me, and I had survived. Even if it had been the home of a potential girlfriend, I would have known precisely what to have done, but that was not the case. I was about to meet my daughter, and quite frankly, I had no idea of what to say or do. In prison, I had been tutored by some of the most brilliant minds in the criminal world about how to commit any crime I chose. I had been schooled in how to seduce women, and how to defeat my enemies, but there was not a mumbling word said by any of the jail-house scholars about how to be a great daddy. Basically, I was on my own, and to my regret, I found nothing in my background that would provide me with the instructions needed to be a daddy. I was a man who had conducted countless shady deals in numerous back alleys in the darkest hours of the night. I had been in a couple of shootouts with the police. I had robbed banks and had come up a winner more than once when death was on my tail, but I knew that being a daddy would be my biggest challenge. What was even more scary was the fact that none of the qualities that had made me a well-respected gangsta in the streets or that had allowed me to survive in some of the toughest prisons in the country would make me a good daddy. And guess what….I wasn’t
  25. 2 points
    Brotha Troy, that has long been a knock against us as a collective. Strangely, it has survived for much too long. I do admit that it so convenient as I have used it on countless occasions to force home a point. Honestly, as much as I hate to admit it, but I barely read. Sure, I read snippets here and there. In this fast-paced, I have become a browser whereas I was once a fierce reader. Yet, there is a blanket exception to this rule because brrothas in the joint READ! Inside reading is fundamental. Inside, if you wants news, you have to read about it because, of all places, televised news is blase. News rarely affects prisoners so more time is spent watching sports and videos. When I was in the pen in Atlanta the first time, there were guys there that had well-stocked libraries in their cells. My crime partner and I were among the youngest there, and I was forever reading as I was hardly without a book or a magazine. The old heads noticed this and they would bring me books to the dining room where I worked. I had my own table where I read. Guys that were old enough at the time to be my father, supplied me with a mind-boggling array of books----all serious literature. I recall sitting at my table reading Freud. The next day, an old white convict gave me a book about Carl Jung. Reading the ART of War got me editions of books by Clausewitz and Otto Von Bismarck and Machiavelli. It was truly like guys would walk past my table to see what I was reading,and then they would bring me something even more in depth. And now, I barely pick up a book. That's sad. Now, we want info on the go, so we fall for fake news or second hand news or worse yet no news. Trying to keep up is so time=consuming that if you don't hear through the grapevine, it didn't happen. I conclude with an admission. Of all the things I get down on myself about is the fact that I never stopped to teach a close friend how to read. Damn, we were in prison for ten years together and I never taught him to read. I wrote all his letters for him, but I could have taught him to read. I was once chastised by another friend who told me that I was wrong for not teaching this guy this read, but I was too busy writing my books. I was so convinced that I was writing the next best novel that I was so caught up that I never taught my friend to read. It wasn't that I never thought about it. I did. I even planned to write stories about him to use to teach him to read. The sad thing, Brotha Troy, is that I knew what to do becaause on an earlier stretch in the joint, I was at a prison where they wanted to teach inmates to read, but they knew they just couldn't put anyone in charge so it was decided to use the Muslim community to spearhead the program. They knew how well respected Muslims were in the joint so they taught us so we could teach the rest of the population who didn't read. They knew the guys would trust us. We were taught what was called The Laubach Method and this is the text we taught from. I had no excuse. Just think, I blew the chance to give someone the gift of reading. Wow......I don't think I will ever live that down, but I have made up my mind. I am going to find him one day and apologize. The man was my cellmate for 10 long years and I never taught him to read, and I pray to God that I am never so selfish again in my life.
  26. 2 points
    @Troy I am - thanks to my mother, oldest daughter and most surprising from when I worked as an international flight attendant. Depending on the caste -those are consensual marriages where the arrangment is more like a “bake sale”. In one case I know of, they can choose from a variety of people from the same town. (I think it’s weird because these folks have to be distant cousins.) The older sister has to marry first - then the next sister gets to pick. If the older sister is “fat” the younger sister gets to be single for a lot longer... I also know of couples who married outside of their caste and ethnicity too. Glad you cleared up you’re against forced marriages. I was giving you the side eye over here. 😊
  27. 2 points
    Could be. Both you, @Delano and @Cynique clarified there’s a difference between “support” and “defense”... It’s hard not to agree. When you mentioned Troy’s belief, that is shared by quite a few black men (putting racism before feminism), I couldn’t think of any time in history when black men haven’t suggested “there’s a time and place for black women... (whatever black women conjured up for the best for society) — by the way, the Ethiopian PM made put women in half the cabinet positions - and put in place a woman president... because he believes women are best for the country... there’s that but its not quite the same as defending women. He put women in position to defend the country. They were feminist? Rallied for equal rights for black women? Black women march against the state to save the lives of black men and boys they don’t know. That’s the difference.
  28. 2 points
    I saw an article before I went to bed that sounded formular to that moment in my life. That gave me a flash back. No, I stuck with job until a shift became available because another employee quit on the shift that I needed.
  29. 2 points
    According to BBC.Com - 5 October 2017 “The New York Times publishes a story detailing decades of allegations of sexual harrassment against Harvey Weinstein. Actresses Rose McGowan and Ashley Judd are among women who come foward. ...Weinstein apologizes and takea a leave of absence” a lot more stuff then on 25 May 2018 “Weinstein turns himself in to NY Police on sexual misconduct charges.” Police charge him with rape and several other counts of sexual abuse against two women. https://www.bbc.com/news/entertainment-arts-41594672
  30. 2 points
    And we're live! The Amber and the Hidden City Kickstarter is up and running. This graphic novel is based on the popular Amber and the Hidden City novel by yours truly. Help us bring this amazing story to life. We have thirty days to make it happen. Make your pledge and spread the word! Amber and the Hidden City Kickstarter
  31. 2 points
    The City. No one knows how it began or when it will end. No one knows how we came to be here, 20 million souls, 1500 different species all crammed together in plascrete and biosteel. No one's been in or out of the city in 20 centuries. Some have their theories why, some don't care. But no matter whom you are, or what you are, you have a story, don't you? The trick is finding someone who cares to listen...' -Knowledge Lateef, Street Priest The City anthology is a unique creation. It’s a concept anthology, a collection of stories where eighteen different authors share their vision of a single idea. It’s Cyberfunk, cyberpunk stories that play with future concepts from an African/African American perspective. Most of all it’s engaging, exciting, thought provoking and fun. Like the inhabitants, the City is perceived in various ways by the various writers. Some stories intersect, some diverge, but they all entertain. The result is a journey into a unique world described by unique and engaging voices. Buy your copy today from MVmedia today! The City: A Cyberfunk Anthology
  32. 2 points
    The people going on shooting sprees and those who become victims of the oxicodone, are more likely to be dysfunctional middle class whites, than ignorant snaggle-toothed Trump supporters high on meth, open carrying their assault rifles more for show than mass killings. You waste your empathy of these underclass whites who put Trump in office. You fall into the same category as the bleeding heart liberals who make excuses for these so-called victims. I can say with just as much conviction that they are not sympathetic characters but are bigots who did feel their white entitlement was threatened. Observe them at Trump rallies and listen to them in interviews. They bristle with resentment toward people not conditions. Kanye talked about slavery being a choice and he was wrong because black people were physically and mentally shackled. But for the millions of slovenly, indigent white folks, subsisting on government handouts is a choice. No matter how bad their schools, they are still better-funded and operated than black ones. They need only to make an effort to get their act together and these whites are free to seek their fortune, secure in the knowledge that their white skin privilege is their ticket to a better life. Compare whites and blacks to their peers when asking the question who is better off. A poor white person is better off than a poor black person, and a middle class white person is better off then a middle class black one. A middle class black person is only better off than a poor white person because he has shown more ambition but his status doesn't immunize him against racism.
  33. 2 points
    Troy you are right but also wrong. Who is defending poor whites Donald J Trump nominally while they get pick pocketed. Master overseer slave it still works. Actually his message is for disenfranchised whit's who are more concerned with maintain their perceived superiority than fairness justice or liberty for all.
  34. 2 points
    I read your blog article Believe in Yo’Self; yep, you can be in a creative business without believing in yourself.
  35. 2 points
    NIKE is not a philanthropic organization. @Troy As a business man, yourself, why are you so contemptuous of corporations using marketing strategies in order to push their products and realize a profit for them and their stock holders? If you had your way, companies would just post a picture of their product with a caption: "This is what we are trying to sell. We'd appreciate it if you would please buy it." Nobody forces anybody to buy something that catches their fancy. Consumerism is based on a "buying what you want rather than what you need" mind-set. People tend to compartmentalize their lives and acquiring cherished possessions is a niche they set aside to spoil themselves.
  36. 2 points
    @Mel Hopkins Thank you so much! And, your post was so on point! @Cynique You are welcome! @Pioneer1 Thank you. @Pioneer1 I think it is because that was only step 1. I am speaking on a personal basis here. I can't believe that you can't see this for what it is. Ms. Grande's smiling mean noting to his behavior. He borderlined if not crossed the line on what is criminal, and that is why the news reports showed the clip. It's obvious. I was taught that a person doesn't even have to touch you, and certain behaviors is considered 'AN ASSAULT'. Ms. Grande may have smiled and kept up an decent reaction due to being 'caught off guard' and for the sake of the situation being public, but she was clearly tensed up at his grabbing her like that.
  37. 2 points
    @Pioneer1 , Troy was pretty specific about saying that he wasn't referring to F-buddies. This question was about finding and building a relationship with a ( life) partner. Have you been able to find a life partner? What has been your experience with a viable relationship with a woman. Have you ever been engaged, left at the altar - married? divorced? And by the way, how is it even possible to measure someone's sex drive?
  38. 2 points
    @Troy men don't factor into our lives like that... We, women, dress and style ourselves for ourselves. We look for styles that compliment us that make us feel the best about ourselves. When we feel we look our best then we feel confident and it's the confidence that attract others to us. We seek to attract others for many different reasons -men being the least of those reasons. In fact, women have been known to elicit opinions from a gay men on fashion and will buy clothes they design for us. Heterosexual men have commented on my outfits/hairstyle/haircolor but I've never looked to them for approval. In fact, think who had the most to say about what former first lady Michelle Obama wore - men or women? Think about who reads fashion magazines? Read the copy - it rarely, if ever talks about what men will think about the designs. Think about who styles our hair? I think I've had one heterosexual hairstylist in my life. The others who styled/colored my hair did so, so I could look "fierce"... Fierce translates into confidence, btw. Now, when you see women wear sweats, ponytail, and a baseball cap, even sunglasses that's when we are dressing for men. We specifically don't want attention, but especially a man's attention. But I've learned, as my "sisters" have, sometimes that doesn't even work. As for hair color, "blond" hair is high maintenance especially if your natural color is dark or grey.... In both cases you have to strip the hair color to make it porous enough to accept the blond color. Strip it too much and you wind up bald. (see any youtube video for example) So I doubt very seriously that Mary doesn't know why she colors her hair. She knows why - and has chosen to maintain it for her career that reaches back more than 25 years.
  39. 2 points
    African Americans are probably more Americans than African. We should be more concerned about the content of our mind than the condition of our hair. Dick Gregory. Judging by the posts it isn't a racist picture. It seems to be more about the eye of the beholder. Women are to be consumed like a meal. The complaint is that she isn't appetizing
  40. 1 point
    Chev and Del We all appreciated Cynique's presence here, including myself. But like Troy said about the site's future....that's life. I'm sure you've had loved ones in the off-line world that have literally died.....passed away. You don't like it but life goes on and you continue to evolve because you don't have much of a choice. It's a similar concept with an "online" family or friendship. People stop posting or sites shut down for various reasons and people you've kicked it with for years disappear on you. I remember one site I had been kicking it on for 7 or 8 years and then one day the owner came on and announced he would be shutting down it in a few weeks...and I almost cried, lol. Some of them said they were going to facebook too, but I refused. I still wonder where some of the characters I used to build with are.
  41. 1 point
    @Troy , I'd say yes but I don't know enough about astrology to even share an informed opinion. But CONSIDER ( etymonline : from Latin considerare "to look at closely, observe," probably literally "to observe the stars," from assimilated form of com "with, together" (see con-) + sidus (genitive sideris) "heavenly body, star, constellation" (see sidereal).Perhaps a metaphor from navigation, but more likely reflecting Roman obsession with divination by astrology.) this, astrology hails from a time of Natural Philosophy - which predates modern science. This is one of the reasons why some of the words in our language (latin) are star-based. I mentioned the scientific method didn't come into existence until the 17th century but modern humans (i.e. "Africans", kushites, Aksumites, Romans, were dabbling in Natural Philosophy long before Anglos took the "scientific" reins. So, while Astrology isn't recognized today as a hard science maybe that too has to do with politics. Aside: I did a quick search to see if anyone ever got a PhD in the field of Astrology and it appears "Patrice Guinard was awarded the first PhD in astrology in 1993 from Sorbonne University" Here's some links if anyone wants to do a deep dive http://cura.free.fr/histo.html http://www.astrology-and-science.com/p-guin2.htm
  42. 1 point
    Hey there! Partially I have been busy. But mostly staying low and watching words unfold. It's always interesting. I won't be able to make it to the Black Pack Party. How have you been?
  43. 1 point
    Is your book club interested in Afrofuturism and the Black Fantastic? Contact us today to learn about our book club discounts! E-mail us at mv_media@bellsouth.net for more details. MVmedia: The Best of the Black Fantastic
  44. 1 point
    @Mel Hopkins Thank you. Exotic Matter... That is so amazing! And another concept I was thinking about on this subject-- You know, when I go to the doctor to get an XRAY!!!??? I am wondering if there is a connection to this subject too, even though I know that there is today, no answer, but the explanation that you wrote is amazing. I can't wait to share it with some 'thinkers'! You know, when you go to get an xray, you are told to stand on one side of a room, and then hold your breath; then the tech takes a pic, somehow, and within seconds, their it is!!!-- a picture of your skeleton on a film! ... and then what about 'cameras too? ... a dark rooms where films were developed.... I think that there is so much more to know in this world...
  45. 1 point
    @Pioneer1Oh puleeze. Anything to blame the media and exonerate a black man, - even a gay one. The Chicago Police Department bent over backwards to treat Jussie fairly because they knew they were under scrutiny by the entire nation due to their bad reputation. Bottom line, if Jussie hadn't done what he did, none of this would be happening to him and you wouldn't have to be trotting out your usual paranoid theories. Jussie is being punished for his stupidity, and he is solely to blame for the damage he has done to the credibility of the black and gay communities. All because he didn't think Empire was paying him enough money.
  46. 1 point
    I was not asserting that. I was saying it is not necessary. However the notion that some women style their hair in a manner they believe men would find appealing is not exactly absurd. Wouldn't you agree @Cynique? Of course there are and given the escalating cost of college that might seem reasonable. The reality however is less than 10 percent of Black women are currently enrolled in college. @Delano I dunno. From a personal perspective I judged Brown on his music which for the most part I enjoy -- again I give entertaining a lot of leeway in how they present themselves. When Al first rose to prominence his hair style, obesity, and jogging suit, was definitely a negative in my book... he was a mess. What do you think Del?
  47. 1 point
    Rainy. Christmas. Eve,Cold. Wind Blowing,We. Have. Finished. Shopping,And. Caroling. .We. Are. Drinking. Mocha. And. Relaxing. We,Slow. Dancing. To. Soul. Romantic. Christmas. Songs On The,Radio. As We Joyfully Kiss Beneath The Mistletoe..She Captivating,Enchanting,Such A Delight.. She Will Help Make My,Christmas Bright. She As Sweet. And. Lovely. As A Rose. As. We,Joyfully Kiss Beneath. The Mistletoe...
  48. 1 point
    Troy yes it appears there us indeed a great if pressure for acceptance of homosexuality. Is this a bad thing? While it is not my life style, is what two consenting adults do really our business? It depends. To use Delano's argument in another thread, it depends on the INTENT of those pressuring for it's acceptance. If the intent is to make the public more tolerant and accepting of those who are born a certain way and can't help themselves.....I'd say NO...it's not a bad thing. However if the intent to promote homosexuality is to INCREASE homosexuality and homosexual activity among a targeted population for the purposes of: 1. Causing CONFUSION among that targeted group in order to cause chaos and fighting between them and 2. LIMITING and REDUCING the population of that group by encoraging more same sex sexual activity and discouraging heterosexual activity and thus decreasing the reproduction rate. ....then I'd have to say YES, it is a bad thing. Infact, it's a form of "positive" genocide where instead of killing those who are already born you just prevent them from being born in the first place.   Chev You make a great point that there is a difference between homosexuality and homosexual ACTIVITY. Two men can kiss eachother on the mouth. That may be considered homosexal ACTIVITY....however if they're both actors and getting PAID to do it then it's not homosexuality. It's just two men acting out a role or going through the motions without any sexual feelings behind it. Women from East Asia walk around all the time holding hands but that doesn't mean they are lesbians, it's just part of their culture. For it to be actual homosexuality there must be the homosexual feelings or intent behind it. Tariq Nasheed and Harlem Elder weigh in on the Kevin Hart controversy and Tariq goes into how it's part of a greater plan to cause sexual confusion among people of color:
  49. 1 point
    I think I would put black male ahead of white female. Black men got the right to vote first. Black man handily defeated a white woman for the democratic nomination for president. I would also include class in the equation @Delano. Rich, white men rule the world. But a rich Black woman trumps a poor white man. As long as the difference in class is visibly obvious.
  50. 1 point
    Yes but who leads, or rather whose vision is followed.
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