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  1. 5 points
    @Troy I can't remember disagreeing with @Cynique @Chevdove or @zaji in any way that would cause me to want to express that disagreement. I may have a different opinion about something but their presentation allows for me to consider their perspective. I've even found myself doing some research and keeping an open mind for more information to possibly advance the discussion. But I don't disagree with them. Even if you can find where I said "I disagree" know that I misspoke. I believe most women are socialized to have a perspective that is built on a foundation of evidence. Unfortunately, here in America women are often dismissed as NOT having knowledge about a topic. Even In your thread about instagram - you decided I didn't have knowledge of world wide web and its commercial activities. You didn't even ask me, first. But that's the world women live in - so when we express an opinion or subjective observation, trust most of us have a mountain of evidence to back it up. I don't bet on stuff. Aside: I used to bet on horses but racing horses is cruel and inhumane so I don't do it anymore. I would absolutely miss Cynique if she leaves the board - but I saw that in my email and I had to stop what I was doing to respond to this thread. I really appreciate you @Cynique ! You add the je ne sais quoi to this forum that allows so many of us to think and consider your words, experiences and thoughts. You are a magus and beautiful philosopher! ♥️
  2. 4 points
    We are all aware of the mainstream media's negative narrative about black men. We are constantly bombarded with stories of high incarceration rates, black on black violence, deadbeat dads and of course police brutality. From the outside looking in it appears that black men are destined for failure and there is nothing that can be done to change the implied negative trajectory that black men are on. But is the media's narrative true? Are black men really an endangered species? I believe the answer is an emphatic no and I have made it my life's to work to support and empower black men to overcome the negative stereotypes and to create extraordinary lives. In order for black men to succeed the first thing they must do is understand how societal conditioning contributes to creating a negative mindset and attitude about what it means to be a black man. Too many black men feel hopeless and powerless as a result of the constant barrage of negative images and stories coming not only from the white biased media but also from the black media that definitely contributes to the negative narratives about what it means to be black. So what can be done to support black men in overcoming the multiplicity of challenges they face on a daily basis? How can we help change the mindset of black men and empower them to know they have unlimited potential and the future is extremely bright for those who are willing to put forth the effort? I believe the key to resolving a large percentage of challenges facing black them is to support them in changing their own inner narrative about themselves. The good book says; "be ye not conformed to this world, but be ye transformed by the renewing of your mind." Herein lies the key to transforming black men's lives. We must be willing to encourage black men to examine the internal negative beliefs and perceptions they have about themselves. We must engage them in a dialog about what they believe, how they feel and what they think about being black. Too many times their inner dialog about themselves is so negative they have no choice other than to act out that negative internal dialog. Therefore it is incumbent upon us to change their inner dialog by providing resources that support them in changing their negative mindset and attitude. This can be accomplished through things like workshops and seminars, reading books, listening to audio programs and creating support groups that provide safe spaces for them to speak openly about the highs and lows, joys and pain of being a black man. When we help them change their inner dialog about themselves it will give them a sense of optimism and hope for the future which will then encourage them to develop a positive mindset and attitude that will keep them from falling victim to negative media generated narratives about who they are. It is definitely possible for any black man to live an extraordinary life. We are all capable of creating inner peace, dynamic health, great relationships and financial abundance. To do so, a black man must be willing to take 100% responsibility for his life turning out the way he wants it to. The only way to do this is through changing his inner narrative about himself and recognizing that he has the capacity to do anything he sets his mind to.
  3. 4 points
    The first 24 hour Black News Channel is expected to launch November 15, 2019 @6:00 AM. The cable network is the brainchild of J.C. Watts, Jr., former U.S Representative (R-Oklahoma) now BNC chairman and Veteran Journalist Bob Brilliante who will serve as the cable network's CEO. BNC Newsroom management made their rounds at the National Association Black Journalists Job fair in Miami, FL earlier this month. The news channel, headquartered in Tallahassee, Fl, will broadcast to 33 million households nationwide with a major presence in Los Angeles, Atlanta and New York. ~MH You can read the release here: https://blacknewschannel.com/wp-content/uploads/BNC_NABJ-Press-Release_2019.pdf
  4. 4 points
    a student loan paid, and your student loan is paid and your student loan is paid too... The graduating class of Morehouse College had commencement Keynote Speaker Billionaire Robert F. Smith give them a send off into the real world...but in addition to parting words he will allow these seniors to be debt-free to the tune of $40 million. Wow just wow... CNN Breaking News https://www.cnn.com/2019/05/19/us/morehouse-robert-smith-student-loans-trnd/
  5. 4 points
    I am the same way. I typically try to merely express my opinion/views, not launch into outright disagreement, as though in a war. Additionally, if I have ever used that language (I disagree), it is not hard and fast disagreement. I am always open to discussing anything, regardless of my personal views. I know one fundamental thing, no human (including myself) knows everything. No human has a monopoly on truth. I try to carry a sense of humility around things/ideas/knowledge, as long as the thing isn't so overboard that it can do great harm. Then humility or not, I must do everything to stop the verbal harm being done. Generally, however, I will discourse to a point. If I see there is no balance, I stop talking.
  6. 3 points
    I appreciate you guys allowing me to become a part of this endeavor. I love my people and remain seriously concerned for our future. Here and in Africa.
  7. 3 points
    AAAAHHHHH! I LOVE CHERYL CROW! No you didn't!!! LOL. Man! That was so good! Such a release! Man! Thank you @Kareem @Maurice Thank you for posting. WHEW! WHEW! I LOVE THE BEATLES. Man! I could listend to 'Hey Jude' over and over and over... This has made my day!!! Lol! I ain't listening to no mo!--for now because I won't stop. I love CHIC and KC & the Sunshine Band. Man!
  8. 3 points
    This song and Baez's sound reminds me of Sheryl Crow, who I really like. I'll listen to more of Joan Baez based on your recommendation. There were a lot of folksy ladies like this in the early 1990s along with Sheryl Crow. The 10,000 Maniacs (Natalie Merchant) are also high on my early 90s favorites. Truth be told, one of my first girlfriends when I was very young was a white chick who played the violin. So 10,000 Maniacs kind of reminds me of that! But I've always loved the sound of violins and other string instruments (cello, viola, etc.). Nile Rodgers in the late 1970s used them all to perfection in his music, and it's always cute white chicks playing those violins and violas! Again there will never be another 70s or 80s. The talent to compose and perform the music, the love, the respect between black and white...all that cannot exist today...sadly. We tried so hard in the USA to fix racism in the 70s and 80s. The powers-that-be just didn't want that to happen. In sum...
  9. 3 points
    At the risk of 'jumping in', I'd like to welcome you back even though Ive only been a member for six months now. Greetings from South East England.
  10. 3 points
    I'm reading a few books but am primarily focused on Evil Never Sleeps: Tales of Light and Darkness, by Robert Fleming. Robert is one of America’s most accomplished writers. He has written poetry, novels, nonfiction articles, and has reviewed over 60 books for AALBC. His work spans over 40 years. It seems to me that writers like Robert should be better known, but he is just your run of the mill late-middle-aged Black man {yawn}. He’s not Caribbean or African, he’s not LGBT, he does not have a white parent, he can’t rap or dunk a basketball, he wasn’t gang banger or previously incarcerated. He is the kind of writer that I always complain about being ignored by the mainstream media. Robert's accomplishments will never go viral on twitter despite his significant contributions to our literature.
  11. 3 points
    @Pioneer1 You may be right. Black discussion forums are rapidly becoming a thing of the past. I revisited a post, not even two years old, where someone who ran a discussion forum ranked a few others. Half the forums have shut down -- including the one run by the person who made the post. Connie summed it up best she has more fun on Facebook. The part about typos on posts here, while true, is also true on facebook. That really is the bottom line. For the vast majority of social media users I observe in real life - who pass me their phone to share something funny they saw on some social site. Of course these sites are designed to highly engage folks and they work very well. Fast growing platforms like TikTok are completely driven by entertaining videos. Facebook's mobile feed attempts to mimic this but they can't... ultimately people will leave Facebook too. During the peak of this forum, I would regularly laugh out loud by something I read here, but I could also learn something. There was humourous posts, serious ones, and everything in between. Most importantly, at least to me, is that this platform is Black-owned and independent. I'm a child of the 60s, who grew up in the segregated northern ghetto of Harlem. So Black independence is a thing I find to be important. This is a sentiment that is dying along with indie Black focused and owned websites. One reason independence is important is that businesses like AALBC provides opportunities for people. The writers, editors, and others I pay are not being paid by the likes of a Mark Zuckerberg. Of course AALBC's ability to do this is adversely impacted the dominace of Google, Amazon, and social. Fortunately, individuals whether they are sponsors, site vistors, or contributors to this forum are the people who keep this site alive. If you are reading this thank YOU for helping to keep this site alive! Also, thank you on behalf of the writers whose work you support, but who will probably never fully appreciate your impact.
  12. 3 points
    This is the beginning of a new era for me on this site. I will TRY to be more understanding of other people's views and more appreciative of the knowledge and information other people are presenting. Some may ask what has caused me to seek a change in my demeanor. Well......Del, Troy, and Cynique have been advising me for quite some time to "expand" my thinking and not see things just from a narrow selfish perspective but it wasn't until I reviewed Mel's African American Culture thread....OVER AND OVER AGAIN....and how adamant I was in my error that I realized how embarassingly foolish and down right irritating it may have seemed to others. Another thing I noticed about my conduct was that as much as I liked people supporting my views and giving me positive "likes"..... I almost never did it for others. So as I've said I will try to be more appreciative and infact this appreciation will start with the owner and Moderator Troy. Thank you bro for providing me and others with a platform to express ourselves...the good and the bad...as well as a safe space for up and coming AfroAmerican authors to promote their talents and intellectual gifts.
  13. 3 points
    @TroyAn interesting explanation but not entirely on the mark. I don't know about Mel, but my always being in step with her is not because we are both females but because she a smart astute, insightful person who i find easy to side with because she makes sense and is amusing. I don't find any reason to oppose Chevedove, either, whether i disagree with her or not. She's full of documented information. I know very little about the subjects she posts and she educates me and doesn't have an arrogant bone in her body. i also felt this way about Chris Burns, who is a man. i am not a sensitive person and there is not a man on this board who could hurt my feelings because insults just roll off my back. I don't take myself that seriously. As for pioneer i couldn't care less whether he stays or goes. i'm not trying to run him away. i just don't feel like i have an obligation to like everybody. Some people are just the epitome of what turns me off and familiarity breeds contempt if you get my drift, but that's life. You and Del have areas of expertise that make you interesting people. A lot of what i say is off the top of my head. i have a store on knowledge in my mental files. Sometimes it's accurate, sometimes not. Whatever
  14. 3 points
    I am enjoying the renewed vigor of this battle... The I mean discussion.
  15. 3 points
    I dated a model for a few years when I was much younger. She was on the cover of magazines and the like. In her photo shoots she always wore a wigs. One magazine was a Black hair care magazine she was in the cover wearing a wig. I found this to be misleading, because the article covered hair care not wig wearing. I write all this to explain @Chevdove that I do not believe all women in the photos you posted are sporting their own natural hair. As a result, it is difficult to get into a discussion of this type if you don't believe the source information... But I get why women love to talk about this stuff. I presented at a Bloggers conference one. It was 90% women. Interestingly most wore their hair in what appeared to me to be natural styles, and many were quite attractive. To my disappointment about 1/3 of the Bloggers wrote about hair. There was this really popular Blogger they were all seemingly attempting to emulate, because they kept bringing her name up (I wish I could remember her name). At any rate, the whole event was boring to me -- thought the women seemed to enjoy themselves. I can't understand women's fixation with hair. I'm not passing judgment. I'm just making an observation. I don't get people obsession with baseball either. In every relationship I've been in my partner invested a lot of time, energy, money, and emotions over there hair. And boy, whenever I was asked how I thought their hair looked the answer must be "It looks great honey!" and I better say it, with feeling, like I mean it too :-)
  16. 3 points
    All of these observations are something i can relate to. Of late i am consumed by melancholy and jolted by the relentless thud of another one biting the dust. As A.E. Housman so succinctly put it; With rue my heart is laden, for golden friends i had, for many a rose-lipped maiden, and many a light-foot lad. By brooks too broad for leaping, the light-foot lads are laid, And the rose-lipped maids are sleeping in fields where roses fade...
  17. 3 points
    So young too... As I learned of Singleton's passing, my sister-in-law passed under similar circumstances. She too was what I consider young -- early 50s. A poker buddy passed a few weeks ago (early 60's). If seems the older I get the more people around me die. I heard Smokey Robin say, during the Sam Cooke documentary, that Aretha was his "oldest living friend." Of course she too is now dead... I hear one of the hardest things about growing old is losing family and friends. Life really is quite fleeting. I guess one of the advantages of growing old(er) is the realization almost nothing we stress over is not worth the energy. Live Long and Prosper Y'all 🖖🏾
  18. 3 points
    Me neither @Delano. Normally I would skip over stuff like this, but occasionally I'll check things just so that I'm not 100% out of the pop-culture loop. The headline I used for this post was the same one used by the Huntington Post -- another click-baity misleading head line they are prone to using. I wanted to see if it would attract more attention than other posts here (it did not). I'm curious to understand why Michelle produced a video to praise her friend -- when a call or text message to Beyonce would more than suffice. Is Michelle Obama no different than any of the other attention seeking social media junkies out there? My 20-something kid was in town this past weekend and we watched the Beyonce Chochella (sp?) convert documentary, for which Michelle Obama was praising Beyonce in the video above (@Chevdove) -- also something I would not normally do. It was a major production and I can only image how much money Beyonce made giving that performance. I have to say though I loved how she integrated the marching band into the performance -- but I love HBCU marching bands :-)
  19. 3 points
    You begin by using your imagination! Also, your brain has a delete button. But anyway, next don’t reinforce the “junk” messages. Remember the saying “let it go in one ear and out the other” It works. We seem to retain what we respond/react to. So whether you say “I hate this” or “I love that” you’re still giving it space. So be neutral and let it pass. Don’t build on it. Then just like a laxative, fill your mind with something foreign. Imagine things that send you on a scavenger hunt for more things you’ve never heard of. Today, I was writing a post for The Thriving Writer and I decided I needed 1 word to describe a concept... So I “bing-ed” it and found there is such a thing as a Enigmatologist. There’s only 1 who actually has a degree in puzzle creation and he created his own degree that was conferred upon him in 1974 from the University of Indiana. From my one small quest - I learned that It’s possible to create your own undergraduate degree in something like puzzlemaking AND allegedly be the only one in the world -to use it. He currently works at the New York Times as a crossword puzzle editor. That’s just a few examples - but thank you! You’ve given me a topic for next week’s blog post. Also refrain from “commentary”...instead take a concept in a whole new direction. For example; “The Bible is scientifically Accurate” Instead of commenting on the topic directly in an attempt to refute or cosign the claims - we expand the topic. For example we return to @Chevdove post where we began to speculate about quantum mechanics - time travel and the possiblity of passing through walls. This is how you perform a brain cleanse...😊
  20. 2 points
    Legendary pianist died.
  21. 2 points
    What you know about Sheryl? 😊 That's my lady. Nile Rodgers is perhaps the most underrated musician of all time. He, along with Bernard Edwards playing the bass...there's nothing better in music for me. Norma Jean Wright, Alfa Anderson and Luci Martin were the vocalists and I love all of them. They were featured at different points between 1976-1980. God I miss black people MAKING music. 90% of musicians have stolen from black music. That said, the Stones were many of my close friends' parents favorite band. I don't know if I like them, or if I just associate a lot of their songs with childhood memories; thus I like them. Either way, they made an impact on me for sure. I always thought Mick Jagger was a crazy-looking mofo! LOL! His collab with Michael Jackson in the mid-80s was really when I start figuring out who Mick Jagger and the Stones were. Of course Michael normalized many of those Brits in our lives! LOL!
  22. 2 points
    Saint Louis, Dec 16, 2019 (Issuewire.com) - Eating the Forbidden Fruit is a gritty fiction novel loosely based on true events in author Roland Sato Page life. The newcomer author delivers a personal journey into his rise and demise as a St. Louis City Police Officer. He takes the readers on a roller coaster ride of good old family memories to the nightmarish reality of being a police officer indicted on federal drug charges. During his trial, he wrote memoirs as a testimonial of redemption. Roland's case stems from the conflict of his childhood affiliation and his oath to uphold the law. What is certain one can't run from sin for karma is much faster. The author actually wrote the novel years ago however after battling Lupus he lost his motivation to complete it. Promising his mother, Fumi Karasawa, who recently passed that he would finish what he started. Roland opened his computer to complete telling his story. He also would like to encourage others with determination they too can reestablish position as a productive citizen. Roland was a popular tattoo artist in the St. Louis area however once diagnosed with Lupus he lost his hand and eye coordination bringing the body art career to a halt. No other choice he had to reinvent himself transforming visual art into literary art. Writing is quite therapeutic for the newly ordained writer. The silver lining is his family support kept him going. "With tragedy comes blessings". If you are anticipating the release of "Eating The Forbidden Fruit" then your wait won't belong. Be on the lookout for the fictional novel in March 30 2020 on all major book outlets.
  23. 2 points
    I'm not knocking the musician. This particular song just doesn't move me. The 70s were the first full decade black people experienced in this country without slavery or Jim Crow. Disco and funk reflected that. We had fun, relaxed and displayed our musical prowess. It takes talent to play instruments, read and write music. So I'd disagree that funk is simple. But it reflects a relatively simple time when black people finally felt a little relief from the boots on our necks. The only music that is unique to Europeans is opera. And nobody likes that crap except Europeans. Everything else they stole from cultured people. Michael Bolton's entire career is plagiarism. The Isley Brothers won a $5.2 million lawsuit against Bolton in 2001 for the latter plagiarizing their song "Love is a Wonderful Thing." That Katy Perry chick plagiarized a Christian rap group for one of her biggest hits. If litigation wasn't so expensive and time-consuming, I'd bet 90% of white "artists" would be exposed for who and what they are. That's why white supremacist society ushered in rap in the late 80s. They wanted black people to be talentless copycats too, like them. And man, that Billy Ocean tape with Caribbean Queen, Suddenly, and Mystery Lady might be one of the best albums of all time. The 1980s was the closest the United States will ever get to being a racial melting pot of peace and understanding. And it was the music and television shows that did it. I believe white supremacist society recognized that they were humanizing black people too much in the 80s and they quickly propped up gangsta rap and all those hood movies in the 1990s to destroy what the 80s had done for our overall image. I wasn't alive in the 1960s at all. But must say I am a big fan of all the original Motown sounds and classic rock. Many of the 80s biggest hits that you wouldn't know were remakes came from the 1960s. Joan Jett's "I Love Rock 'N Roll" is a one of the biggest hits of the 1980s. It's a remake by a 70s group called the Arrows. Bananarama's "Venus" was a #1 hit for several weeks in the mid-1980s. It's a remake from the 1960s-70s band Shocking Blue. Tiffany hit #1 with "I Think We're Alone Now." All the kids my age back then had no idea it was a song by Tommy James and the Shondells. There hasn't been much originality since the 1970s. It's funny how the US and UK were very petty in the 1970s and 1980s as far as what bands they allowed from the other country to rank on their respective charts. I was introduced to T Rex and Sweet only because they were played at my local skating rink in the 1980s. My local public library had a HUGE catalog of albums and 8-track tapes, along with a great librarian who knew his stuff about music (a former DJ who influenced my career). The first paper I ever wrote in school was in 3rd or 4th grade and it was about glam rock. It definitely influenced all the 80s hairbands and some of the others wearing outrageous outfits on stage. I don't know why I could never get into the Beatles. Maybe because I always wanted to be different and everyone liked them. Don't get me wrong. There are several Beatles songs I like. I was a black kid who grew up in a white town so basically whatever my friends' parents listened to, that was my experience since my parents were all about soul, funk and R&B. My town was more about Led Zeppelin, The Doors, Janice Joplin and Canadian rockers like Bachman-Turner Overdrive from the 1970s. You and I could probably sit around, smoke weed and listen to music for hours though! :)
  24. 2 points
    This is the first time I've ever heard this song. It's a combination of gospel and blues, if that's really a distinction. Can't say I like it. This strikes me as field slave coping music! Granted we needed this back in the day. But it ain't groovy or nothing! 😀 I think the 80s was the most perfect age of music. I wish time stood still in that decade. It was the first decade of the 20th century without war or recession; and the music reflected that. Lots of fun, heartwarming, unity music from the 80s. But the 70s was the last decade for true black creative music, meaning when black people wrote, produced and performed MUSIC. Janice–Marie Johnson and Perry Kibble (Taste of Honey) are so sexy playing the guitar and bass guitar in "Boogie Oogie Oogie." I love disco and funk so much because they were so US...so groovy and so soul-cleansing. Black people writing, producing and creating music was the norm in the 1970s. We played and perfected every instrument. Rap and vocals overall took over music in the 1980s. @Maurice if you've never seen it, you will appreciate this Jimmy Hendrix interview on the Dick Cavett Show in 1969. We'll never see another Hendrix. We'll never see another 70s or 80s either. Both decades are essentially considered politically incorrect these days. All those 80s odes to women by men, and women singing odes to men will never happen again. This society doesn't want men loving women and women loving men anymore. Whitney Houston's first great song, "All At Once," didn't even chart in the USA in 1985. But itt was top 5 in Belgium, Italy and the Netherlands. I think this is Whitney's greatest song of all time! Don't get me going on music though! LOL!
  25. 2 points
    @Troy The action is here! Some of Independent authors here seem to echo the same thing "I didn't know how to market my book." Except, they do. -It appears they're not strategic in their marketing practices. I was the same way with my first novel - I knew what to do but I didn't work my plan. I like how you call it a (book marketing )"clinic" because it is! We, independent authors, already know what's wrong - we just aren't consistent with our "outpatient" care. I'm writing this out for me too. I believe this is one the best places for original content on the subject. By the way, I like that I don't even have to repost it to my profile - the software keeps track of all my postings as long as I'm signed in. Oh! I'll check out @dtpollard. @Troy OMG @hen81 is my writing "hero"! He didn't come here to play with us one-book every 20 year folks !!! 65 titles according to his last post! 😀
  26. 2 points
    The essence of day 1 was making a game that was a non zero sum base. I placed in the audiobook my audio thoughts. If you want a complete reference, the ebook has the audio as well as the transcript and the game. The Game link below is where you can see my gaming example. In a non zero-sum game, winning or losing is not the goal. In the game I made, the goal is to keep playing it, thus you do not want it to end, you are in control of both sides, like when one plays chess by themselves but unlike the chess scenario the goal is to never have either side win, it is to keep going. In my head, I had an idea of jason and the argonauts, if you know that film from ray harryhausen. Question, what problem does the game have? I will not tell Oh, penultimately, what is the game imaged on the cover of the audiobook/ebook or this blog? And lastly, I love to quiz, where does Houyhnhnm come from? Audiobook : https://www.kobo.com/us/en/audiobook/gameclass-audio-i EBook : https://www.kobo.com/us/en/ebook/gameclass-i Game: https://houyhnhnm.github.io/Gameclass/game1.html Introduction , Day 1 (Above)
  27. 2 points
    2020: Everyone will have perfect vision. No glasses or contact lenses are needed. It’s 2020, a universal year for order: laying a solid foundation to build and grow. Collectivity and balance, oneness in thought and action. The heart should be balanced on the scales of justice to let go, grow and flow. Let go of those memories that attach to the past stagnation that prevents change for the better. Forgive and be forgiven. Love and be loved. Let the artist out. Get into your rhythm, your music. Harmonize, build, grow and unite. Love is in demand, Be complete. All the bestAubrey Doris 20 are even, and 19 is odd. Even numbers are considered feminine and receptive.
  28. 2 points
    For years I've been maintaining a list of the most popular Black-owned websites. That list of 50 websites is actually derived from a much longer list of over 300 websites. The idea was to track the web's largest Black-owned websites who attracted the most visitors. Again, I started the list years ago and expected it to grow, but to a point where it would be difficult to manage. Despite the pages being one of the most popular on the website, the list has actually been shrinking! I have to review the list periodically to check for websites that are no longer active. Usually the domains are quickly snapped up by other, often unrelated, websites trying to take advantage of the traffic obtained from backlinks from sites like mine or links lead to nowhere and are broken. In any event I have to check the links from time to time. This time I was disheartened to see many sites that I really liked disappear. I removed 20 websites from the list including, ChickenBones: A Journal, which was started in 2001, by Rudolph Lewis. We became friendly over the years as we started a few years apparty (AALBC started in 1997) and published similar content. His content will be a great loss to the web. I already reached out to him to avoid this. Another site I removed from the list, is MelaNet not because the domain is down, but the site has simply not updated in years and is full of broken links. Launched in 1997 MelaNet was one of the first Black websites that I can remember. It was also exciting to see because it produced content that I simply was not exposed to before the web was created -- it was as pro-Black and afrocentric as you could get. One of the better book sites on the web APOOO (A Place of Our Own), was started in 2008 and was in a class of book websites you do not see very much today. These sites were popular, well done, and driven my passionate readers. They provided reviews and interviews. Some of these sites migrated to social media, but those platforms are so restrictive and are a poor facsimile of the former websites. I could go on and on. I always lament the fact that the Web is a far less rich place due to the lost of indie websites. Even the indie websites that have survived that last 10 or 20 years are not as good as they can be. Clearly the average person on the web has no clue what has been lost -- otherwise there would be some outrage. I point to the corporate domination (ownership really) of the World Wide Web as the cause. I described in the past how Google, in a single day, took about 75% of my traffic (along with other Black owned book sites, newspapers and other entities). It took my site over 5 years to recover. Many of the other websites just folded or failed to recover. For many people today, the World Wide Web is comprised solely of Amazon, Google, and a few social media sites. There are still some good and potentially great websites. All we have to do it is take advantage of them.
  29. 2 points
    Speaking of "authority" check out this book coming out next month:
  30. 2 points
    @Pioneer1 I agree the program sounds like woke psychobabble designed to seperate naive students from their money by capitalizing on Cullors notoriety. I would have wrote that "...extends beyond the hashtag." I know that's cynical but...
  31. 2 points
    Curves touched pressed into mine, your hand slowly moving along the arch of my spine. A tiny gap appears between my thighs, a twist of my lips; it is a glimpse of moments that have you asking why. A pair of large breast pointed up toward the sky, silk wrapped mounds are the reflection of my hips in your eyes. Caressing the back of the neck, the tasting of earlobes are a thought to reflect. Exploring the essence of the whine as it create its own lyrics begging to not be alone, Tongues intertwine to dance in one place as your hand venture into my secret space where the tune of my movements are as whimpers in the dark where the shadow of the moon tap the clit and the heart. Climactic explosions of melodies made are the twirling of two areolas as the nipples displayed. Pulling up on the waist as the body collides. The flinch to the jerk is the strike of ecstasy’s mind. then the spirit so provoked as to spin in space and the mind body and soul race back to that place where delights has them all begging for more. Yet, the thoughts of the moment repeating its self keeps them unsure. Did it happen? Was this foreplay real? Did you make love to my mind? it was so surreal. This was my thoughts at just hello, makes a girl step back to consider for him how far she will go. You had me at hello.
  32. 2 points
    @Mel Hopkins books and audiobooks for reading or listening:) Music is something I am working on. To any who may see the following I have to go into storytime mode , talking about Kobo, with the advantage of hindsight. The ebook industry's problem began with the firm first to make an ereader, Amazon. Amazon knew, based on how they dominated the eretail market, that people online in the usa are loyal to websites. They do not leave them voluntarily, for the most part. I know this having been forced to leave two blog sites, and only after the second actually doing real searching into what is out there. amazon also knew the only danger to their plan is not having a large library and not having a growing new publications list. Amazon thus opened their writing program and converted as many books as possible into ebooks, using their system. The last piece of their statian domination , though most vital, was their machines. the Amazon kindle was the first ereader, but the amazon fire is the economy car tablet. Thus, amazon had the two devices most people in the usa will have to read ebooks. And the kindle doesn't accept epub and the fire doesn't allow every other app, like kobo's for example. The dominance Amazon has in the usa market is like facebooks. I know for certain other websites do better or equal to facebook or instagram in the esocial , but their audience is not based in the usa. Sequentially, people in the USA are hard to see the other firms. That last point connect to Kobo but I continue. ... Barnes and noble tried to mirror Amazon's strategy, thinking their book stores gave them a userbase that can wither amazon's in the reading world. But, barnes and noble was wrong. amazon's strategy depended on being first, the second your firm is not first, you can not duplicate amazon. Another bookstore called Borders had to do something. They were not a tech firm like amazon and didn't have the money like barnes and noble to invest in making a product. But, this canadian firm Kobo, had a product. Me side my blood relatives, love to read, and liked going to borders. Sequentially, when they sold the first Kobo's we were interested. The best thing about the original kobo was the purpose. This was not a multipurpose device, this was a straight forward read ebook device. I do not like to buy technology that overlaps purpose, so I was interested. Over time, borders went out of business as Kobo couldn't provide the uptake needed in the usa market. But, Kobo survived cause outside the usa, many liked the universal nature of kobo. Unlike barnes and noble or amazon, Kobo's objective is getting people to read. And, they developed a nice market share in europe especially, where the buying habits to technology are not like the usa. THis is why in Europe, the nintendo game systems market shares are much larger than sony playstation or microsoft xbox. PEople in europe do buy sony or microsoft, but many people in europe have an affordable quality mentality to buying technology. Nintendo fits that mold, Kobo as well, fitted that mold. But, to make more devices, Kobo needed investment and they couldn't get it on there own. So, here comes Rakuten, a japanese company, biggest publisher in japan. They owned Overdrive, which is a website that was started in the usa, but centers on ebook collections. Rakuten bought them too and combined was able to advance both companies projects. Overdrive like Kobo are not well known by the average usa ereader, but in certain sections in the usa and definitely outside of it, are more well known or more importantly used. Now, what does this have to do with being a member of Kobo writing life. You have to comprehend, being a member of Kobo in the usa, means few will ever know what you are talking about. My storytelling was meant to explain the international strength of Kobo is key. Kobo is not the biggest ebook firm in the usa, and will not be any time soon. Many, not necessarily most, of the biggest kobo writers also have amazon accounts. But, if you are expecting people in the usa, to have automatic recognition to kobo, you are wrong. Having said that, I considered joining amazon aside others writing programs. But I joined Kobo after trying to join amazon first, it was too complicated or messy. It seemed amazon wanted me to sign an affidavit on something and that bothered me. I conclude with the following. Do what you want, in terms of writing program. I am not a fan to amazon but in the end I am not one to tell others where to go or what to do. But Kobo is a stable or straightforward writing program, that gives you access to strong unfamiliar reading markets outside the usa,which are becoming more accustomed to the ebook at a faster growing rate, or overdrive. I can't give you a revenue sheet to guarantee financial success. But, I can tell you that Kobo's writing life , even part of Rakuten, maintains their original premise, which is an open format, for writers to dictate their prices and how their books are sold. Kobo is not going to beg anyone to come to them but the door is open, use at your own will. Now, I am off that silly pulpit.
  33. 2 points
    Maurice I hear you...... I'm not sure about the laws in Romania but I'm a supporter of free speech. As long as you aren't calling for somone's harm or exposiong personal information about them like thier address or phone number.....I say you should speak your mind. Is it wrong? Ofcourse. But when you start punishing people for what they say it's becomes a slipperly slope. And ofcourse the station should have the right to fire that individual if they choose without the government forcing them to keep him or let him go. I say fight fire with fire. Serena should be allowed to go on a Romanian radio show and use some of the skills she learned growing up in "Da CPT" to roast his ass....lol.
  34. 2 points
    @Troy I've already updated several blog posts I've written or edited about Malcolm over the years and placed your link in them.
  35. 2 points
    I just gave away my copy of Marable's book (I often gift books to guests who come to my home). Marable's book was particularly controversial because it mentioned (or implied I never actually read the specific text), that Malcolm has sex with white men for money. A Lie of Reinvention: Correcting Manning Marable’s Malcolm X by Jared Ball and Todd Steven Burroughs corrects issues raised by Marable. Marable died just before the book was published. I often wondered about his untimely death in the context of the publication of his book. The Crisis of the Negro Intellectual: A Historical Analysis of the Failure of Black Leadership by Harold Cruse was a classic. I bet Cruse could go to town in 2019!
  36. 2 points
    Toni Morrison lived to be 88. She had a tremendously successful and, I trust happy, life. Today I received a lot of email from friends informing me of Morrison's passing describing it as "sad" and even "horrible." I understand the permanent loss of anyone, especially someone so talented, is sad, but Morrison's transition is the culmination of a life well lived, a life worth celebrating. We all should be so blessed. R.I.P. Toni Morrison
  37. 2 points
    We black women straighten hair or we don’t. We color our hair or we don’t. Sometimes in the same week! Beyonce at the Lion King Premiere 2019, Serena Williams at the royal wedding 2018. Mary J Blige (undated) BUT Women worldwide change their literal body parts to look like black women. So, that makes black women the standard. There is no low self-esteem when the world wants to look like you.
  38. 2 points
    @Mel Hopkins Will do! @Troy This would help me.
  39. 2 points
  40. 2 points
    Humm @Delano you may have shown me a feature I was unaware of, "Last Visited." I always assumed it was the last posting date. I can tell you one thing for sure, the software does not track visitors, by name, unless they have an account AND are logged in. So, Cynique can view the forums, without logging in, and all you will see is "guest." Now, I have access to ip addresses, so I could in map the IP addresses of guests to one that Cynique has previously used and get a better indication of when she last visited, but I don't have that kind of free time. Besides, if she wanted to make her presence known she would just post. @Delano you seemed to be overly concerned that @Cynique will never return. Why? Did you look at the number of posts that she actually made over a 9 years period -- winning the day 500 times! Those stats are far more interesting. That does not included the 13,874 posts she made from 2002 until 2010, when I moved the forums to AALBC from thumperscorner.com. Del, that is an average of three posts per day, everyday, for 17 years. She is 80+ years old. If she never posted another thing here in life, she did her part. I agree with @Chevdove in that fatigue -- both mental and physical played a part. Del think about what that means. She actively engaged in a substantive and often enlightening way here for the better part of 20 years! Most people her age don't even use the web -- let alone actively engage on it. Is your mom actively engaged on the web? My own mother has no clue what I do on these forums -- let alone participate in them. I know you miss her Del. I do too, but all good things come to an end and she really did her part to make these forums interesting. All of you who participate make these forums interesting (you lurkers help too). No one else has done it on the level of Cynique -- at least not yet ;-)
  41. 2 points
    Numbers are integral part of science and without numbers it wouldn't be possible to conduct experiments. If numbers are created and not discovered then irs possible mathematics is built on fiction. https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/article/great-math-mystery/
  42. 2 points
    Two and a half years, Americans were left toiling, unlawfully – like slaves. 30 months in a timeless zone of what they knew; what they were. Extracted and uprooted by the thousands, for this very purpose, to Western Texas, far from justice and away from humanity. But for now, forget the ones that survived, for some died not knowing they were free, not knowing their children and grandchildren and great grandchildren have survived their plight. Read more... http://www.mafoombay.com/juneteenth-june-19th-1865/
  43. 2 points
  44. 2 points
    Word. My God, who cares about this birth... really? I'm not even sure most Brits give a crap -- none that I know do.
  45. 2 points
    Oiling your freshly washed hair and using a hot comb to straighten the kinks out of it so as to make it more manageable. An Ebonic dialect of which unique colorful slang is a spinoff. . A cuisine known as soul food (that has become demonized because it is a guilty pleasure whose sapience stems from ingredients purportedly bad for your health.) Music genres made up of Jazz, Blues, R&B and negro spirituals. An innovative version of the card game whist which is referred to as "bid-whist", a popular pass time which was originated by and is played exclusively by black people.
  46. 2 points
    Happy Hardcore Easter 🙂
  47. 2 points
    I'm just uninspired and unmotivated. 'Don't have anything to say and am becoming indifferent to all the crap going on in the world. The whole political scene is cock-eyed and discouraging. Elsewhere, I couldn't care less about the fire that razed the cathedral of Notre Dame in Paris, a fiery holocaust that struck me as being karma for the hypocrisy and corruption within the Catholic church. i'm suspended in a zone which regularly reminds me of how out-of-kilter my sphere of existence is as things are still disappearing, then materializing in a familiar place days later, - this along with weird examples of syncronicity between unexpected occurrences. I'm also like a time traveler as my memories and dreams constantly return to the distant past. And the weather. Below freezing temps and ground covered with snow one day, then 70 degrees and sunny 2 days later...rash of fatal accidents in the area with drivers going the wrong way on Chicago's expressway, plowing into oncoming traffic...my grandson's dog becoming more attached to me, always wanting to hang out in my room...in-laws suddenly back in my life. Craziness. . The return of "Game of Thrones" did break through and pique my interest, and looking forward to seeing how it comes out is one of the few things that captivates my focus, along with the Reconstruction era documentaries airing on PBS. Oh, well. Hopefully, i'll snap out of it.
  48. 2 points
    I think religion can life saving. The problem is when it is organised. The Bible is a good study on human nature and motivation.
  49. 2 points
    @Del i recently crossed paths with a someone from my distant past, a guy who i could've possibly married. He was in amazinly good shape for his age, and when our eyes briefly locked, there was something there. Do you see anything in my future that could revolve around him?
  50. 2 points
    The Universe seems to be in some kind of a transition. The unexpected is intruding itself upon the world. That's why Trump is successfully polluting the atmosphere and America is being drawn into a vortex of change. There's no contrived conspiracy; just occurrences following a course. No right or wrong; only opposites. Life is inexorably unfolding, and things are shifting because change is inevitable, Here on earth change is aided and abetted by the lure of computerized technology. I don't think Mankind has any control over how society is evolving. It's simply being swept along. I, myself, am caught up in a sphere where everything is out of kilter. It's like unseen forces are toying with me. As an example, Mel's on point response to the above posts by Troy and "non American black man", has disappeared...
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