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  1. Really? I can understand from an emotionally-invested perspective … But from a legal standpoint the PA Supreme court got it right. We still have rights under the constitution. So if prosecution wants to keep playing these shoddy legal maneuvers, then those guilty of crimes will be on the street. Especially since, the more money you have the better access you have to exercising legal rights. Now if you’re broke and black, the wheels of justice turn slowly. Did you see the story of a Black man who was finally exonerated after serving 34 years in prison? If he were wealthy he would have never served a day.
    2 points
  2. Dude, I can't even afford to live in NYC let alone run a brick and mortar store there. But I guess if it is going to happen one has to dream big. Thanks! I'll peep Tariq's game.
    2 points
  3. It's not easy to challenge racism or work for positive social change. Most of us are just trying to live and work regular lives. Being an activist or running for elected office is an impossible task for most people. Maybe black people are no different from anyone else in this regard. At the same time when you look at the black community blaming all the problems solely on racism or economic injustice doesn't make sense. Black people mess up like anyone else. We succeed or fail based on individualism as much as fighting against racism. There are things we must do as people beyond struggle. These things are moral and spiritual. Other issues can be addressed by black community groups and businesses. However this country has been and remains systemically racist. Furthermore working people live and labor in an unjust economy that mainly benefits wealthy elites and corporations. These things undermine black people regardless of other problems. Self help is no substitute for protest or politics. Drugs, gun violence, fatherlessness, academic underachievement, and the decline of marriage undermine black life and community. All of these things are tied together, and they make it harder for us to access opportunity when it is available. Black people have always been deprived of rights and material benefits relative to whites in this society, but we didn't live like this. Crime despite racial stereotypes racist law enforcement didn't plague our neighborhoods. Two parent and strong extended family relationships provided love, discipline, and shelter amid poverty and crippling discrimination. We had each other if we had nothing else. Doing well in school and advancing to college was something everyone took pride in. Our schools were inadequate, but we made the most of things. The irony is not lost on black people that when so many things seemed to get better because of the Civil Rights Movement and a decline in blatant racism black community life declined. We lost the family. We started killing each other over drugs and turf. Oftentimes the violence doesn't have a reason. Too many of us don't succeed in school and it's not the education system - it's us. Contrary to widespread belief among whites blacks spend a lot of time talking about these problems rather than racism. There's nothing wrong with self criticism. Furthermore, we need to all be better people as parents, husbands, wives, lovers, students, and neighbors. Everything is not about racism or capitalist oppression. At the same time community self help and entrepreneurship are important too. Black people have always done things to help themselves and start businesses. We have banded together despite have meager resources to solve problems and meet needs. While our efforts in this regard may not be covered by the mainstream press, black groups and civil society are doing everything possible to tackle problems faced by urban communities. The same thing is happening with black business. There are more black owned companies than ever. Black athletes and entertainers are not just playing sports, singing, or rapping. They are starting all kinds of companies and engaging in lots of business ventures. While most black businesses are small and have few full time employees others are large million and even billion dollar enterprises. We need to keep doing more self help and entrepreneurship on a bigger and more sophisticated level. No matter how bad things are they would be worse if black people themselves had not assumed individual and collective responsibility. Black people past or present have never waited on the government to help us. We need call out white people and certain blacks who say otherwise. Self help and economic development are no substitute for protest or political engagement. We need to be in the streets and on social media fighting racism and economic injustice. We must demand changes that advance freedom and equality. From the nineteenth century abolitionist movement, to Civil Rights protests, the Black Power Revolution, and now the Black Lives Matter struggle against racist policing nothing has never changed for our good or this country's unless black people fought. Racism and discrimination never went away. They became more subtle and are persistent. Black people are not impoverished, underemployed, less wealthy, and underpaid compared to similar whites because of choices we make. Systemic racism is the problem. This impacts black politics. We must hold elected officials including blacks accountable for getting results. Also Black policy wonks and experts who research solutions to problems are more important than ever. Black activists and elected officials need to make sure these people are included at the highest levels of policy making. We need to stop listening to right leaning white people and blacks who say we have no right to demand anything from society or the democratic process. These blacks say "begging the white man" is undignified and useless. For them the solutions are self made. They emphasize cultural pride and awareness especially Black Nationalists focused on the African past. Others talk about restoring the two parent patriarchal family and starting businesses. Black conservatives claim government programs and protest politics have ruined black families, community life, and moral fiber. The call for moral rehabilitation and making our way in society built on less government. Whether it's Black Nationalist or Conservative both approaches discourage activist struggle and political engagement. If we follow their lead we will lose the gains we've made. Our progress and wellbeing depend on self help along with protest and political engagement. We're not perfect people and neither is this country. When it comes to solving problems the choice is not either or. It is both. Right now there are people who want blacks to stop pushing. They are determined to hold on to what they have. Some are racist others are driven by greed and a lust for power. Black people have experienced so many political defeats and policy failures. For many self help works. It is something black people can control without whites. For other blacks making the best of things means being a better person and playing by existing rules. To them changing society is not possible or desirable. However history has shown no matter how good or accommodating black people are racism and economic inequality will deprive us of life, liberty, and happiness until we take a stand. No matter what happens blacks are better off because of politics and activist struggle rather than doing nothing at all.
    1 point
  4. America would not exist without racism . Even before it was a nation it had institutionalized racism and oppression .
    1 point
  5. @Pioneer1OK, hell. A typical example of how you frame your rebuttals by putting your spin on what has transpired, supplying motives for what you say someone has done as if you can read their minds. Which you can't. You can't even manage your own discombobulated mind. This desperate tactic says more about you than the people you try to discredit. And, believe me, the stigma of your respect is something i can do very well without! For somebody who thinks he's so smart you obviously cannot make a distinction between "conspiracy" as a noun and "conspiracy" as an adjective. When the word conspiracy is used as an adjective to modify the noun "theory", then it's a whole new situation. I never said there were no such thing as conspiracies. What I contended was that theories about the nature of a possible conspiracy were what i was skeptical about, especially since none of the theories had ever been officially declared to be indisputably true - the reality of which your brain can't seem to process. Now excuse me while I borrow another of your pathetic ploys: making up scenarios... I can picture you over there in the corner, mentally as well as physically contorted as you attempt to pat yourself on the back for the strike-outs you've convinced yourself were home runs, - something your warped ego demands.
    1 point
  6. Dude that is not a "Fact." The "fact" is that is a conspiracy is a conspiracy theory. THINK! More Black boys died from the diseases virtually eradicated by the vaccines Black boys take as children. A FAR more effective way of killing Black people would be to keep the vaccines from us. Of course this is true. "Bad" people can raise good or even great people, and great people can rear bad people. This sounds like what a eugenicist would say. No he was reformed by other people and his own will. This is not a miracle my friend.
    1 point
  7. Mel Funny thin is I kicked Italian Victor’s azz when he called me a n-er. We were rolling around in the school yard until Mr. Weintraub with the awful toupee finally pulled us apart. Lol @ "Italian Victor" I would think if you went to school in New York there would be SO MANY Italians named Victor in your school it would be next to useless to give him that name. It probably wouldn't be too much better than saying "Italian Tony" or "Puerto Rican Hector"...lol. But your story brought up an interesting memory of a Nigerian girl I used to pick on in the 4th grade. I think we even fought eachother once. I didn't pick on her because she was Nigerian because I didn't know about that at the time; I picked on her out of ignorance because she was dark skinned with African features. It's shameful looking back on it now and I regret doing it. She actually turned out to be a very beautiful girl....cheerleader...in high school. I didn't experience much racism as a kid. My neighborhood was ALREADY Black when I was born into it. It was almost all White about 10 years earlier but by the time the late 60s and early 70s rolled around it was pretty much mostly Black. There were only a handful of White people left. Usually those too poor to leave. I still remember some HIPPIES who used to sit on the porch with their shirts off with long hair, playing on their guitars and waving at everybody who passed...lol "Down on the corner... Out in the street....."
    1 point
  8. Powerful video. Who was that little girl threatening to throw the rock back at that boy's face; little @Mel Hopkins..lol...????? Ofcourse most of them have grown up and have spawn another generation or two of racists. I don't remember it but I heard it was the same way in sections of Detroit and other cities that are now pretty much Black or Latino. The Black kids would get harassed and have rocks thrown at them. Probably the only good thing that came out of those days was more Black unity. Right around the late 60s and early 70s different neighborhoods around the city started forming "neighborhood committees" to find out who was moving into which house or building and find out what kind of work they did, where they went to school, what religion they were, ect....but what they REALLY wanted to know was if they were Black or not. And if they were Black they would harass them and threaten them not to move in, or harass them once they moved in.
    1 point
  9. Of course Black should get the vaccine. "They" could have used the MMR vaccine which far more people, including kids, take if they wanted to kill us off. Social media has been far more effective in controlling us; indeed one could argue THAT is the tool confusing so many people NOT to take the vaccine and is THE reason some many more of are dying than necessary. You should live you life on your terms. The "fight" is for young people anyway... Elders should be sought for advise and counsel; to provide motivation and lessons learned. Young Black people are rarely interested in learning from older people, so we reinvent the wheel and make the same mistakes. Often elders refuse to relishing the reins and hold on to power far too long... Some people think that is what the aliens are here to do Seriously, it will not take a miracle. Mortality will be the solution. In 20 years Trump, Mitch McConnell and the old school racist will be out of office and almost certainly be dead.
    1 point
  10. Do you think blacks should get the covid vaccine or do you believe it's part if a government conspiracy to thin our ranks and control us? I'm just curious about your sentiments is regard to this issue. Anyway, I applaud your good intentions but I don't think systemic racism will ever be abolished. Nobody gives up or even shares power and America is not our country. It was not created for us nor does it return our "love". We just live here. And why should a black individual have to make a lifetime commitment to "the struggle"? How much do I owe the race that gives me so little peace of mind? Why can't I live what's left of my life on my own terms? Why am I expected to do what Jesus has neglected to do for his most loyal and devoted followers? Liberate them! At this point, the only idea I can muster up any enthusiasm for is the appearance of a miracle that would take the form of dismantling Trump and the vile right-wing conservative Republicans who support him.
    1 point
  11. Black Representation & Self Interpretation: Owning and Controlling Our Images and Spaces. Join The Conversation TODAY 1:30 p.m. Eastern: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83056672690?pwd=Q2t6U2R2NGx1SW4yUk1tajJzRVFtUT09 Meeting ID: 830 5667 2690 Passcode: 1LKDDX #bookfair #books #readingblack
    1 point
  12. 10 Inspirational Lessons for Finding Success in School, Sports and Life Despite Trials and Challenges, Young Jamaican Immigrant Perseveres and Finds Success at MIT, on the Tennis Court and in Mentoring Others Secrets from MIT, Tennis and the Umpire Above 10 Lessons From A Poor Jamaican Boy Who Never Gave Up On The Court by Tarick T. Walton Tarick Walton’s unique and inspirational immigration story, details a life journey from poor, yet ambitious tennis player in Jamaica to MIT scholar to mentor and charismatic leader. The book also includes 10 cross-cultural and applicable “secret life lessons” that will help readers achieve their dreams, regardless of position in life, workplace, classroom, sports arena, or family. Each lesson that Tarick learned occurred during his journey to and while at MIT or through tennis. All lessons are conveyed within their own stand-alone chapters, and each secret lesson is written in the form of a short story so that the reader can freely choose which lesson applies to their specific position in life. Each short story also includes elements of Jamaican music and art so that readers can get an authentic glimpse of Jamaica’s culture. ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Tarick Walton grew up in Spanish Town, Jamaica. A bright student with dreams of accomplishing big things, for himself and others. After being told he would never get into a prestigious American college, he was determined to prove that he could. Amidst life-altering setbacks, he persevered to successfully graduate from MIT with a degree in Civil and Environmental Engineering. Tarick began playing tennis at a young age, approaching the game of tennis with the same joy, perseverance and determination as he did his studies. From school to sports, every step of Tarick’s life has been filled with challenges and obstacles, however, his joyful tenacity and persistence have allowed him to become not only successful in business but also a mentor to young people who are dedicated to following their dreams. After MIT, Tarick received an MBA from Georgetown University, and with a diverse group of friends, he later co-founded The Walton & Friends Foundation, a 501c3 non-profit organization that brings together leaders of all industries (Business, Art, Science, Non-Profit and Community) to promote STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts & Math) education among youth and engage in corporate social partnership projects that solve real life problems. Whether in work or mentoring youth, Tarick lives by and encourages others with his motto, “Do not let the world dampen your dreams.“ He currently lives in the United States with his wife, son and one on the way. TALKING POINTS: Inspiring youth and immigrants: advice for young readers/immigrants who have a dream 4 tips for managing emotions on and off the court How sports can parallel life: 3 tips for fall sports 3 steps for goal setting: getting back into the classroom after 1.5 years Many of today’s young people prioritize social engagements that are rooted in narcissistic and self-absorbed values instead of eternal principles that have guided great inventors, leaders, artists, activists, and athletes in the past. How can we steer them in the right direction? Are we forgetting to teach young people how to critically think and solve problems? Tips for rediscovering the importance of a God behind the balance of life, similar to the umpire in tennis BOOK SPECS: Pub date: September 30, 2021 Publisher: Page Publishing ISBN: 978-1-6624-2097-9 Format: Paperback Price: $24.95 Page Count: 195 Contact: Leslie Barrett, leslie@prbythebook.com
    1 point
  13. We need to pick our battles wisely. I'm glad the Coz is out of prison, however openly and brazenly embracing a man who according to the evidence: 1. Got women intoxicated to the point they had no control of themselves and proceeded to have sex with them 2. Repeatedly committed adultery on his wife ....does our community a disservice and isn't a very strategic move because of the messages it sends to boys and young men. It also makes women of all races...including Black women...feel a certain way looking at so many men rejoice over this. They may clap and cheer along with Black men but trust me, most AfroAmerican women are looking at the reaction of AfroAmerican men to this and filing it away in their minds....and it's gonna brew and ferment and come out later on as a twisted example some Black men supporting rape and misogyny. Watch and see. I warned Black men a week ago to just be glad our brother was released and keep their mouths SHUT about this. Many didn't want to listen. We're gonna see how their words and reactions to this incident end up being used against some of them.
    1 point
  14. We live in a culture increasingly defined by ideas biased, and elevated, by algorithms designed by young white men to enrich themselves. This creates the false impression that the ideas which rise to the top of our social media feeds must be superior to ideas undiscoverable or unexpressed, on social media. Older media platforms reinforce this notion by trolling social media feeds for "news" to cover. Then working harder to elevation their social media presence than their own platforms. When a Kanye West expresses his political views it makes national news, while the thoughtful perspectives of the few remaining seasoned pollical journalists, who write for Black-owned newsletters, languish in obscurity. Is Kayne's opinion of Trump more important the someone who has studied pollical science, communications, and covered the political scene for decades? Seemingly it is, given the relative about of attention paid to Kayne. Some opinions are objectively "better" than others. Some opinions simply do not deserve an audience and other opinions should be shouted from the highest mountaintop. The idea that we should give equal time to opinions of anti-vaxxers is not only silly, it is dangerous. Anti-vaxxers rhetoric may attract a lot of attention (read: make a lot of money), but the coverage of their ideas by mainstream media gives credibility and a false equivalency to these hairbrained ideas. This is the same behavior that led mainstream media to clamor over every inane tweet generated by Trump. This not only gave Trump a massive and free platform, it eliminated the resources that should have gone toward covering other candidates. Our sorry reaction to the pandemic and the insurrection are just two terrible and direct consequences of our focus on what a Donald Trump thinks over experienced politicians. The idea that white women would choose Trump over Hillary Clinton is easy to understand if you believe that Hillary runs a pedophile ring, out of a Pizzeria, as social media made certain we were aware of this absurd "news" story. Social media's propensity to elevating the ideas of easily triggered young adults, who have not lived long enough to understand, or to have experienced, anything of consequence to "cancel" others is also an insane consequence of social media's bias. Our best and brightest minds will never be provided with a large platform by the mainstream media — especially if they are on Black-owned platforms. This is why we have to identify and elevate these people ourselves. I use AALBC to accomplish this, I will also promote other platforms when I see them to it. This is also why I actively promote Black-owned book websites, Black-owned book stores, Black-owned newspapers, Black-owned magazines, the best Black-owned websites, and much more. The support is not always reciprocal, but when it is, it is great, because it is mutually beneficial and one of the reasons AALBC has lasted almost a quarter of a century on the web. The support AALBC.com gets from institutions and people will never generate as much attention as as someone with, say, 100,000 Instagram followers. But the fact is AALBC has a much larger reach than someone with 100K followers, but again social media's focus is on themselves not — not Black-owned platforms. It never was the job of any social media platform to determine whose opinions should matter most to the Black Community, or to elevate Black-owned platforms — it is ours. Let do it!
    1 point
  15. This video is sad and resonates because in 1978 or '79 I experienced something very similar in the same borough of NYC. My girlfriend, at the time, and I were walking, not too far from her neighborhood, just like these kids were doing on their bicycles. It is something we did as kids—explored our surroundings. We were not surrounded by a mob but white kids started throwing rocks at us and made it clear we were not welcome and would not be allowed to walk on their streets. When you get a mob involved things can really escalate quickly. If the camera's were not around things could have been much worse for these kids. If they were living in home in Queens during this time, I'm sure they were good middle class kids -- of a much higher social standing and rearing than the white people who where hurling racial epithets, rocks, and blows. Those white racist kids go on to become the cops, teachers, nurses who would work in Black neighborhoods....
    0 points
  16. I'm totally surprised!
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