22 Books Published by Dover Publications on Our Site — Book Cover Mosaic

Click for more detail about A Burst of Light: and Other Essays by Audre Lorde A Burst of Light: and Other Essays

by Audre Lorde
Ixia Press (Sep 13, 2017)
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"The self-described black feminist lesbian mother poet used a mixture of prose, theory, poetry, and experience to interrogate oppressions and uplift marginalized communities. She was one of the first black feminists to target heteronormativity, and to encourage black feminists to expand their understanding of erotic pleasure. She amplified anti-oppression, even as breast cancer ravaged her ailing body." — Evette Dionne, Bustle Magazine
Winner of the 1988 Before Columbus Foundation National Book Award, this path-breaking collection of essays is a clarion call to build communities that nurture our spirit. Lorde announces the need for a radical politics of intersectionality while struggling to maintain her own faith as she wages a battle against liver cancer. From reflections on her struggle with the disease to thoughts on lesbian sexuality and African-American identity in a straight white man’s world, Lorde’s voice remains enduringly relevant in today’s political landscape.
Those who practice and encourage social justice activism frequently quote her exhortation, "Caring for myself is not self-indulgence, it is self-preservation, and that is an act of political warfare." In addition to the journal entries of "A Burst of Light: Living with Cancer," this edition includes an interview, "Sadomasochism: Not About Condemnation," and three essays, "I Am Your Sister: Black Women Organizing Across Sexualities," "Apartheid U.S.A.," and "Turning the Beat Around: Lesbian Parenting 1986," as well as a new Foreword by Sonia Sanchez.
"When I don’t know what to do, I turn to the Lorde." — Alexis Pauline Gumbs, Bitch Media


Click for more detail about Dark Reflections by Samuel R. Delany Dark Reflections

by Samuel R. Delany
Dover Publications (Oct 19, 2016)
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“ One of the most profound and courageous writers at work today.” —Michael Cunningham (The Hours). This Stonewall Book Award-winning novel traces the life and unrealized dreams of a homosexual African-American poet. Beautifully written in reverse chronological order, the story opens with Arnold Hawley’s lonely old age, revisits his ill-fated marriage, and concludes with his arrival in New York City, where he forms a lasting bond with his formidable aunt.


Click for more detail about A Key to Uncle Tom’s Cabin: Presenting the Original Facts and Documents Upon Which the Story Is Founded  by Harriet Beecher Stowe A Key to Uncle Tom’s Cabin: Presenting the Original Facts and Documents Upon Which the Story Is Founded

by Harriet Beecher Stowe
Dover Publications (Sep 16, 2015)
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In 1852 Harriet Beecher Stowe published Uncle Tom’s Cabin, an instant classic that received overwhelming acclaim by Northerners and other abolitionist readers. Southerners, conversely, strongly denied the novel’s accuracy. The following year Stowe answered pro-slavery critics with this unique bestseller, a meticulous and thoughtful defense of her work, which cites real-life equivalents to her characters.

Southern readers were further incensed by this follow-up volume, their wrath in no small part inflamed by a Yankee woman’s presuming to tell men what to think. A critical aspect of Stowe’s Key is her critique of the law’ support of not only the institution of slavery but also the mistreatment of individual slaves. As in the original novel, her challenge extends beyond slavery to the law itself. American society’s first widely read political novel, Uncle Tom’This supplement to the novel offers valuable insights into a historical and literary landmark.

Related Links
Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe
Uncle Tom’s Story of His Life: An Autobiography of the Reverend Josiah Henson by Josiah Henson


Click for more detail about The Chinaberry Tree: A Novel of American Life by Jessie Redmon Fauset The Chinaberry Tree: A Novel of American Life

by Jessie Redmon Fauset
Dover Publications (Nov 21, 2013)
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Adultery, incest, and questions of racial identity simmer beneath the tranquil surface of suburban life in this novel, set in a small New Jersey town of the early 1900s. Lovely young Laurentine is obsessed with her “bad blood,” inherited from a common-law interracial union. Proud and independent, she longs for the respectability of a conventional marriage. Laurentine“s vivacious and self-confident cousin, Melissa, also aspires to "marry up." But a family secret shadows Melissa“s dreams and ambitions as she approaches an explosive revelation.


Click for more detail about Comedy: American Style by Jessie Redmon Fauset Comedy: American Style

by Jessie Redmon Fauset
Dover Publications (Oct 17, 2013)
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This ironically titled tale by an influential figure in African-American literature explores the tragic effects of color prejudice and self-hatred. Jessie Redmon Fauset’s 1933 novel paints a haunting portrait of internalized racism with its depiction of a domineering mother whose determination for her children to pass as white leads to devastating results for the entire family.


Click for more detail about African Genesis: Folk Tales and Myths of Africa by Leo Frobenius and Douglas C. Fox African Genesis: Folk Tales and Myths of Africa

by Leo Frobenius and Douglas C. Fox
Dover Publications (Nov 02, 2011)
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An eminent German explorer, ethnologist, and authority on prehistoric art, Leo Frobenius (1873?1938) startled the world of anthropology with his concept of "continuity of cultures" — proposing, for instance, a link between Egyptian religious symbols and preexisting African mythology. In the course of his anthropological fieldwork, Frobenius and other members of his expeditions collected an abundance of authentic African folklore. This volume presents a rich selection of these fascinating tales, fables, and legends.
Stories range from the Kabyl legends of the early Berbers and ballads of the Fulbe bards of Sahel in the southern Sahara to the comically exaggerated Improbable Tales of the Mande in Sudan and the captivating creation myths of the Wahungwe of Southern Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe). The thematic variations in the tales correspond with their narrators’ diverse geographical and cultural backgrounds.
Recounted with engaging simplicity and directness, these frequently amusing, sometimes bizarre stories are illustrated with adaptations of prehistoric rock paintings and portraits of twentieth-century Africans. Of immense value to students of African culture, this book will also appeal to the many devoted readers of folklore and mythology.


Click for more detail about Brown Girl, Brownstones by Paule Marshall Brown Girl, Brownstones

by Paule Marshall
Dover Publications (Jan 15, 2009)
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"An unforgettable novel, written with pride and anger, with rebellion and tears." — Herald Tribune Book Review"Passionate, compelling . . . an impressive accomplishment." — Saturday Review"Remarkable for its courage, its color, and its natural control." — The New Yorker
Selina’s mother wants to stay in Brooklyn and earn enough money to buy a brownstone row house, but her father dreams only of returning to his island home. Torn between a romantic nostalgia for the past and a driving ambition for the future, Selina also faces the everyday burdens of poverty and racism. Written by and about an African-American woman, this coming-of-age story unfolds during the Depression and World War II. Its setting — a close-knit community of immigrants from Barbados — is drawn from the author’s own experience, as are the lilting accents and vivid idioms of the characters’ speech. Paule Marshall’s 1959 novel was among the first to portray the inner life of a young female African-American, as well as depicting the cross-cultural conflict between West Indians and American blacks. It remains a vibrant, compelling tale of self-discovery.


Click for more detail about Not Without Laughter (Dover Thrift Editions) by Langston Hughes Not Without Laughter (Dover Thrift Editions)

by Langston Hughes
Dover Publications (Apr 04, 2008)
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A shining star of the Harlem Renaissance movement, Langston Hughes is one of modern literature’s most revered African-American authors. Although best known for his poetry, Hughes produced in Not Without Laughter a powerful and pioneering classic novel.
This stirring coming-of-age tale unfolds in 1930s rural Kansas. A poignant portrait of African-American family life in the early twentieth century, it follows the story of young Sandy Rogers as he grows from a boy to a man. We meet Sandy’s mother, Annjee, who works as a housekeeper for a wealthy white family; his strong-willed grandmother, Hager; Jimboy, Sandy’s father, who travels the country looking for work; Aunt Tempy, the social climber; and Aunt Harriet, the blues singer who has turned away from her faith.
A fascinating chronicle of a family’s joys and hardships, Not Without Laughter is a vivid exploration of growing up and growing strong in a racially divided society. A rich and important work, it masterfully echoes the black American experience.


Click for more detail about Great Speeches by American Women (Dover Thrift Editions) by James Daley Great Speeches by American Women (Dover Thrift Editions)

by James Daley
Dover Publications (Dec 26, 2007)
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From civil rights to the right to vote, women have spoken up and spoken out throughout American history. Brimming with great power and eloquence, here are twenty-one legendary speeches from the country’s most inspirational female voices, including Jane Addams, Emma Goldman, and Hillary Rodham Clinton. Spanning the centuries from 1851 to 2007, these are the rousing words that continue to endure in our nation’s consciousness.
This distinguished collection includes these American women and their speeches: Sojourner Truth, "Ain’t I a Woman?" 1851; Susan B. Anthony, "On Behalf of the Woman Suffrage Amendment," 1880; Margaret Sanger, "A Moral Necessity of Birth Control," 1921; Mary McLeod Bethune, "A Century of Progress of Negro Women," 1933; Eleanor Roosevelt, "On the Adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights," 1948; Shirley Chisholm, "People and Peace, Not Profits and War," 1969; Geraldine Ferraro, "Vice Presidential Nomination Acceptance Address," 1984; Gloria Steinem, "A Twenty-First Century Feminism," 2002; Nancy Pelosi, "Speech Upon Her Election as Speaker of the House," 2007, and many more unforgettable speeches by spirited and influential American women.


Click for more detail about Great Speeches By African Americans: Frederick Douglass by James Daley Great Speeches By African Americans: Frederick Douglass

by James Daley
Dover Publications (Apr 28, 2006)
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Tracing the struggle for freedom and civil rights across two centuries, this anthology comprises speeches by Frederick Douglass, Sojourner Truth, W. E. B. Du Bois, Martin Luther King, Jr., and other influential figures in the history of African-American culture and politics.
The collection begins with Henry Highland Garnet’s 1843 "An Address to the Slaves of the United States of America," followed by Jermain Wesley Loguen’s "I Am a Fugitive Slave," the famous "Ain’t I a Woman?" speech by Sojourner Truth, and Frederick Douglass’s immortal "What, to the Slave, Is the Fourth of July?" Subsequent orators include John Sweat Rock, John M. Langston, James T. Rapier, Alexander Crummell, Booker T. Washington, Mary Church Terrell, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, Francis J. Grimké, Marcus Garvey, and Mary McLeod Bethune. Martin Luther King, Jr.,’s "I Have a Dream" speech appears here, along with Malcolm X’s "The Ballot or The Bullet," Shirley Chisholm’s "The Black Woman in Contemporary America," "The Constitution: A Living Document" by Thurgood Marshall, and Barack Obama’s "Knox College Commencement Address." Includes 2 selections from the Common Core State Standards Initiative: "I Have a Dream" and "What to the Slave is the Fourth of July."


Click for more detail about The House Servant’s Directory: An African American Butler’s 1827 Guide by Robert Roberts The House Servant’s Directory: An African American Butler’s 1827 Guide

by Robert Roberts
Dover Publications (Apr 21, 2006)
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""In order to get through your work in proper time, you should make it your chief study to rise early in the morning; for an hour before the family rises is worth more to you than two after they are up.""
So begins Robert Roberts’ The House Servant’s Directory, first published in 1827 and the standard for household management for decades afterward. A classic survey of work, home life, and race relations in early America, the book was the result of many years of Roberts’ personal and professional experiences. One of the first books written by an African-American and published by a commercial press, this manual for butlers and waiters offers keen insight into the social milieu, hierarchy, and maintenance of the antebellum manor.
As a servant to a prominent New England family, Roberts provided valuable insights into what was expected of domestic servants. His book contains an abundance of instructions for successfully completing household chores as well as suggestions for properly cleaning furniture and clothing; and for buying, preparing, and serving food and drink for dinner parties of all sizes (much of which is still useful information today). The text also contains suggestions for arranging servants’ work routines, and advice to heads of families on how best to manage their domestic help — extraordinary recommendations for master-servant relationships and highly unusual for the time.
Among the most famous of etiquette books to provide instruction on proper behavior for domestic servants in the early nineteenth century, Roberts’ Directory remains a critical primary source in sociology and African-American history.

You may learn more about this cookbook and other great cook books in Toni Tipton-Martin’s The Jemima Code: Two Centuries of African American Cookbooks


Click for more detail about Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe Uncle Tom’s Cabin

by Harriet Beecher Stowe
Dover Publications (Aug 05, 2005)
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Selling more than 300,000 copies the first year it was published, Stowe’s powerful abolitionist novel fueled the fire of the human rights debate in 1852. Denouncing the institution of slavery in dramatic terms, the incendiary novel quickly draws the reader into the world of slaves and their masters.

Stowe’s characters are powerfully and humanly realized in Uncle Tom, a majestic and heroic slave whose faith and dignity are never corrupted; Eliza and her husband, George, who elude slave catchers and eventually flee a country that condones slavery; Simon Legree, a brutal plantation owner; Little Eva, who suffers emotionally and physically from the suffering of slaves; and fun-loving Topsy, Eva's slave playmate.

Critics, scholars, and students are today revisiting this monumental work with a new objectivity, focusing on Stowe’s compelling portrayal of women and the novel’s theological underpinnings.

Related Links

Uncle Tom’s Cabin Told to the Children by Henrietta Elizabeth Marshall

A Key to Uncle Tom’s Cabin: Presenting the Original Facts and Documents Upon Which the Story Is Founded by Harriet Beecher Stowe

Uncle Tom’s Story of His Life: An Autobiography of the Reverend Josiah Henson by Josiah Henson


Click for more detail about Selected Writings And Speeches Of Marcus Garvey (Dover Thrift Editions) by Marcus Mosiah Garvey Selected Writings And Speeches Of Marcus Garvey (Dover Thrift Editions)

by Marcus Mosiah Garvey
Dover Publications (Jan 11, 2005)
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A controversial figure in the history of race relations around the world, Marcus Garvey amazed his enemies as much as he dazzled his admirers. This anthology contains some of the African-American rights advocate’s most noted writings and speeches, including "Declaration of the Rights of the Negro Peoples of the World" and "Africa for the Africans."

Africa For The Africans

Say! Africa for the Africans,
Like America for the Americans:
This the rallying cry for a nation,
Be it in peace or revolution. 

Blacks are men, no longer cringing fools;
They demand a place, not like weak tools;
But among the world of nations great
They demand a free self-governing state. 

Hurrah! Hurrah! Great Africa wakes;
She is calling her sons, and none forsakes,
But to colors of the nation runs,
Even though assailed by enemy guns. 

Cry it loud, and shout it Ion' hurrah!
Time has changed, so hail! New Africa!
We are now awakened, rights to see:
We shall fight for dearest liberty. 

Mighty kingdoms have been truly reared
On the bones of blackmen, facts declared;
History tells this awful, pungent truth,
Africa awakes to her rights forsooth. 

Europe cries to Europeans, ho!
Asiatics claim Asia, so
Australia for Australians,
And Africa for the Africans. 

Blackmen's hands have joined now together,
They will fight and brave all death's weather,
Motherland to save, and make her free,
Spreading joy for all to live and see. 

None shall turn us back, in freedom's name,
We go marching like to men of fame
Who have given laws and codes to kings,
Sending evil flying on crippled wings. 

Blackmen shall in groups reassemble,
Rich and poor and the great and humble:
Justice shall be their rallying cry,
When millions of soldiers pass us by. 

Look for that day, coming, surely soon,
When the sons of Ham will show no coon
Could the mighty deeds of valor do
Which shall bring giants for peace to sue 

Hurrah! Hurrah! Better times are near;
Let us front the conflict and prepare;
Greet the world as soldiers, bravely true:
"Sunder not," Africa shouts to you.


Click for more detail about The Marrow of Tradition (Dover Value Editions) by Charles W. Chesnutt The Marrow of Tradition (Dover Value Editions)

by Charles W. Chesnutt
Dover Publications (Dec 19, 2003)
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A landmark in the history of African-American fiction, this gripping 1901 novel was among the first literary challenges to racial stereotypes. Its tragic history of two families unfolds against the backdrop of the post-Reconstruction South and climaxes with a race riot based on an actual 1898 incident. The author relied upon eyewitness accounts of the riot to create an authentic setting and mood, and his sensitive artistry transcends a simple re-telling of the facts with a dramatic rendering of the conflict between racism and social justice. Unabridged republication of the classic 1901 edition.


Click for more detail about West African Folk Tales (African American) by Hugh Vernon-Jackson West African Folk Tales (African American)

by Hugh Vernon-Jackson
Dover Publications (Apr 23, 2003)
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Folk tales around the world, observes the author, often contain similar narratives, providing, perhaps, yet another example of the universal brotherhood of man. This volume of West African folk tales includes a number of such tales, among them, "The Cricket and the Toad," "The Greedy Hare," "The Tortoise and His Broken Shell," "The Story of a Farmer and Four Hyenas," "The Man with Seven Dogs," and "The Boy in the Drum." Animals, both natural and magical, play large roles in these stories. Collected by the author over the years from West Africans of all ages, these charming tales will not only delight folklore enthusiasts but will also appeal to anyone fascinated by African cultures. Parents and teachers in search of cross-cultural material for children will also find this volume a wonderful resource.


Click for more detail about When I Was a Slave: Memoirs from the Slave Narrative Collection (Dover Thrift Editions) by Henry Norman When I Was a Slave: Memoirs from the Slave Narrative Collection (Dover Thrift Editions)

by Henry Norman
Dover Publications (Jul 01, 2002)
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More than 2,000 interviews with former slaves, who, in blunt, simple language, provide often-startling first-person accounts of their lives in bondage. Includes some of the most detailed, compelling, and engrossing life histories in the Slave Narrative Collection, a project funded by the U.S. Government. An illuminating source of information.


Click for more detail about Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl by Harriet Jacobs Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl

by Harriet Jacobs
Dover Publications (Nov 09, 2001)
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An Important Contribution to the Birth of African American Literature

$100 reward posting for Harriett JacobsThe true story of an individual’s struggle for self-identity, self-preservation, and freedom, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl remains among the few extant slave narratives written by a woman. This autobiographical account chronicles the remarkable odyssey of Harriet Jacobs (1813–1897) whose dauntless spirit and faith carried her from a life of servitude and degradation in North Carolina to liberty and reunion with her children in the North.

Written and published in 1861 after Jacobs’ harrowing escape from a vile and predatory master, the memoir delivers a powerful and unflinching portrayal of the abuses and hypocrisy of the master-slave relationship. Jacobs writes frankly of the horrors she suffered as a slave, her eventual escape after several unsuccessful attempts, and her seven years in self-imposed exile, hiding in a coffin-like "garret" attached to her grandmother’s porch.

A rare firsthand account of a courageous woman’s determination and endurance, this inspirational story also represents a valuable historical record of the continuing battle for freedom and the preservation of family.


Click for more detail about Selected Poems by Claude McKay Selected Poems

by Claude McKay
Dover Publications (Jun 30, 1999)
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In his 1918 autobiographical essay, "A Negro Poet Writes," Claude McKay (1889–1948), reveals much about the wellspring of his poetry.
"I am a black man, born in Jamaica, B.W.I., and have been living in America for the last years. It was the first time I had ever come face to face with such manifest, implacable hate of my race, and my feelings were indescribable … Looking about me with bigger and clearer eyes I saw that this cruelty in different ways was going on all over the world. Whites were exploiting and oppressing whites even as they exploited and oppressed the yellows and blacks. And the oppressed, groaning under the leash, evinced the same despicable hate and harshness toward their weaker fellows. I ceased to think of people and things in the mass. [O]ne must seek for the noblest and best in the individual life only: each soul must save itself."
So wrote the first major poet of the Harlem Renaissance, whose collection of poetry, Harlem Shadows (1922), is widely regarded as having launched the movement. But McKay’s literary significance goes far beyond his fierce condemnations of racial bigotry and oppression, as is amply demonstrated by the universal appeal of his sonnet, "If We Must Die," recited by Winston Churchill in a speech against the Nazis in World War II.
While in Jamaica, McKay produced two works of dialect verse, Songs of Jamaica and Constab Ballads, that were widely read on the island. In richly authentic dialect, the poet evoked the folksongs and peasant life of his native country. The present volume, meticulously edited and with an introduction by scholar Joan R. Sherman, includes a representative selection of this dialect verse, as well as uncollected poems, and a generous number in standard English from Harlem Shadows.

If We Must Die

If we must die, let it not be like hogs
Hunted and penned in an inglorious spot,
While round us bark the mad and hungry dogs,
Making their mock at our accursèd lot.
If we must die, O let us nobly die,
So that our precious blood may not be shed
In vain; then even the monsters we defy
Shall be constrained to honor us though dead!
O kinsmen! we must meet the common foe!
Though far outnumbered let us show us brave,
And for their thousand blows deal one death-blow!
What though before us lies the open grave?
Like men we'll face the murderous, cowardly pack,
Pressed to the wall, dying, but fighting back!  


Click for more detail about African Folk Tales (Dover Children’s Thrift Classics) by Hugh Vernon-Jackson African Folk Tales (Dover Children’s Thrift Classics)

by Hugh Vernon-Jackson
Dover Publications (Jan 08, 1999)
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This exciting collection of traditional African folk tales introduces you to a host of interesting people and unusual animals. Eighteen authentic fables, recorded as they were told by tribal members of Nigerian and other cultures, range from the imaginative "Story of a Farmer and Four Hyenas" to an entertaining account of "The Man with Seven Dogs."
In "The Magic Crocodile," you’ll meet a reptile with very strange powers, while "The Boy in the Drum" teaches a valuable lesson in the importance of obeying one’s parents. In "The Hare and the Crownbird," a fine, feathered friend is rewarded for its acts of kindness. You’ll also learn why a ram has a large head and a tortoise a small one in "The Greedy but Cunning Tortoise"; and in "A She-Goat and Her Children," you’ll discover how a clever animal managed to provide food for her children.
Set in large, easy-to-read type and enhanced with Yuko Green’s 19 lively illustrations, this collection of time-honored folk tales will delight readers of all ages.


Click for more detail about African-American Poetry: An Anthology, 1773-1927 (Dover Thrift Editions) by Joan R. Sherman African-American Poetry: An Anthology, 1773-1927 (Dover Thrift Editions)

by Joan R. Sherman
Dover Publications (Jul 07, 1997)
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Rich selection of 74 poems ranging from the religious and moral verse of Phillis Wheatley Peters (ca. 1753–1784) to 20th-century work of Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen. Other contributors include James Weldon Johnson, Paul Laurence Dunbar, many others. Indispensable for students of the black experience in America and any lover of fine poetry. Includes 4 selections from the Common Core State Standards Initiative: "I, Too, Sing America," "Lift Every Voice and Sing," "Yet Do I Marvel," and "On Being Brought from Africa to America."


Click for more detail about The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man by James Weldon Johnson The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man

by James Weldon Johnson
Dover Publications (May 10, 1995)
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One of the most prominent African-Americans of his time, James Weldon Johnson (1871–1938) was a successful lawyer, educator, social reformer, songwriter, and critic. But it was as a poet and novelist that he achieved lasting fame.
Among his most famous works, The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man in many ways parallels Johnson’s own remarkable life. First published in 1912, the novel relates, through an anonymous narrator, events in the life of an American of mixed ethnicity whose exceptional abilities and ambiguous appearance allow him unusual social mobility — from the rural South to the urban North and eventually to Europe.
A radical departure from earlier books by black authors, this pioneering work not only probes the psychological aspects of "passing for white" but also examines the American caste and class system. The human drama is powerful and revealing — from the narrator’s persistent battles with personal demons to his firsthand observations of a Southern lynching and the mingling of races in New York’s bohemian atmosphere at the turn of the century.
Revolutionary for its time, the Autobiography remains both an unrivaled example of black expression and a major contribution to American literature.


Click for more detail about The Souls of Black Folk by W.E.B. Du Bois The Souls of Black Folk

by W.E.B. Du Bois
Dover Publications (May 20, 1994)
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Originally published in 1903, The Souls of Black Folk is a classic study of race, culture, and education at the turn of the twentieth century. With its singular combination of essays, memoir, and fiction, this book vaulted W. E. B. Du Bois to the forefront of American political commentary and civil rights activism. The Souls of Black Folk is an impassioned, at times searing account of the situation of African Americans in the United States. Du Bois makes a forceful case for the access of African Americans to higher education, memorably extols the achievements of black culture (above all the spirituals or 'sorrow songs'), and advances the provocative and influential argument that due to the inequalities and pressures of the 'race problem', African American identity is characterized by 'double consciousness'. First published in 1903, this extraordinary work not only recorded and explained history, it helped to alter its course. Written after Du Bois had earned his Ph.D. from Harvard and studied in Berlin, these 14 essays contain both the academic language of sociology and the rich lyrics of African spirituals, which Du Bois called "sorrow songs."