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Mel Hopkins

What is African American Culture?

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What is culture and cultural traditions that are unique to Africans (ascendant) in America?  

 

I hear some folks complain about cultural appropriation. But I’m not sure what we consider cultural isn’t actually assimilation. 

 

Without researching, I can think of a few things that are uniquely African American 

 

1) buck dancing 

2) gospel singing with 4 part harmony (the quartets)

3) drumming (djembe drums)

3) jazz music composition

4) scat  / Rap / hip hop

5) trimming hair on the first friday of the new moon...observing & worshipping nature in general

6) seasoning foods with herbs and animal fats, 

7) 

 

what else?

 

 

 

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I consider it "cultural appropriation" when the original meaning is divorced from the practice -- particularly when it is done for profit.

 

For example, the violence, drug and alcohol abuse, and misogyny we see in the most popular hip-hop music is cultural appropriation.  Having nothing to do with hip-hop's origins and original intent because it has been co-opted and is no longer uniquely African American.

 

A plainer example of the appropriation of Christianity into Santa Clause and the Easter Bunny.  Christianity itself was appropriated from African cultures again for profit.

 

Anything uniquely African American is appropriated by others for profit.  Whether it is our cuisine, hair care products, or music. 

 

I know that does not answer your question @Mel Hopkins but it was just a thought that came to mind.

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Black people are cultural whores. They influence the culture but don't generally control the narrative. 

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31 minutes ago, Delano said:

They influence the culture but don't generally control the narrative. 

 

Scary but true, IMO too! We do seem to influence the culture but cannot control the narrative. But @Delano then, does that mean, on the other hand, that it is not us, Black folk that are the cultural whores? Shouldn't this mean that other kinds of people who prey on us to define what they think our culture should be or how we should act as Black folk, the true cultural whores? 

 

20 hours ago, Mel Hopkins said:

What is culture and cultural traditions that are unique to Africans (ascendant) in America?  

 

@Mel Hopkins Awesome question! As I read you lists and got to 'Rap and Hip Hop', I had to pause, go back and re-read your first sentence because I had lost site of the fact that this is about AFrican Americans and not our African origins.

 

What is 'Buck dancing'?

 

In the past, I've done research on the true definition of 'culture' and still become confused. So now even, I may not completely understand. I am still in the learning process.

However, I think that part of the definition of anyone's culture should also include their [1] genetic origins and [2] the beginning government that covers them as a people as well. Therefore, I feel that part of what defines African American culture should include our beginning African origins with direct respect to the Slave Ship Trade Era and the Colonial 'Christian' Movement. 

 

African Americans come from the Afican continent and were chosen out amongst other Africans based on certain identifiable genetic traits and they were forced to submit under the European Colonial 'Christian' system for hundreds of years prior to the Separation of Church [Christianity] & State on July 4, 1776. So the beginning African American culture initially developed from these origins and everything today, I believe, is based off of this when it comes to our presence even today. Our culture has been shaped by these beginnings. For example, our ancestors were given a certain type of food to eat and today, we may call it 'Soul Food' but this cultural aspect was based out of slavery, being forced to either eat what was given to us or die. So now, many of us keep the tradition and incorporated it in other ways too. But because there are African AMericans today that have no connection to these understandings, may not have this aspect or eat this kind of food and don't define themselves in this way, but nevertheless, this still would be part of our original culture.

 

Some non-AFrican Americans who marry into our culture may or may not choose to nurture their kids and involve the other spouse to share in these cultural origins or traditions and then this may cause confusion too today. For example, non-African Americans like like Kim Kardashiah's children, may not ever connect to this history, unless she chooses to teach them or the father decides to teach it to his children when they are young enough to claim this sort of history. But then others may decide that it was a bad cultural aspect and choose not to teach certain cultural history. In this aspect, the definition of culture and cultural tradition becomes confusing to me. 

 

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@Chevdove  I’m happy to have the answers go in any direction they need too!  This is extremely interesting to me. 

 

My primary query is about Africans in America - specifically African American culture and cultural traditions colonial and post colonial America.

 

Some of us arrived here in colonial America because we chose to - “Free Negro is the British legal term. Some of us were enslaved in the post colonial America brought from West Africa to the United States.  Some of us arrived in the north and lived there for generations.  Some later joined the northerners after enslavement ...

 

We came from different parts of Africa bringing with us a lot of traditions from our native countries that were passed on and remain with us today...

 

So this is why I mention African (ascendants) in America... and what did we bring to America such as teaching the inhabitants how to diversify their crops and farm the land.  

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Chevdove said:

Shouldn't this mean that other kinds of people who prey on us to define what they think our culture should be or how we should act as Black folk, the true cultural whores? 

Those people are the pimps. 

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5 hours ago, Troy said:

Christianity itself was appropriated from African cultures again for profit.

 

I agree.

 

But to be clear Christianity is from East Africa.   The first “Christian” church - Tewahedo Orthodox  began in Ethiopia in 4 AD  

 

Egyptians (Canaanites)  at the other side of the Nile were polytheist.  Some would later become monotheists.  I don’t think the majority of the Africans in the North ever worshipped the Hebrew God of Abraham or Jesus

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23 hours ago, Mel Hopkins said:

1) buck dancing

 

@Chevdove I don't know what this means either, or rather, where it actually comes from. I've used the term to describe Black people who degrade themselves to entertain white folks. 

 

I guess that is no different than people who use "uncle tom" to describe Black people who who sell out other Blacks to white people for personal benefit, without understanding the origin of the phrase.

 

I will look up buck dancing... maybe it should nit be used as a derogatory term.

 

@Mel Hopkins i was actually going back much farther than Christianity itself. There is evidence that Mary, Jesus, and Joseph are based upon the the Egyptians Asar, Auset, and Heru. Of course there is proof many other stories from the bible including the virgin birth, the flood, etc are derived from much older sources.

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😄 buck dancing is ours ... which all popular dances flowed - my Nana used to buck dance like nobody’s business and my mom said the real skill is when you kept a bottle between your knees while doing it...

 

 

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On 4/30/2019 at 5:24 PM, Mel Hopkins said:

what else?

  1. Oiling your freshly washed hair and using a hot comb to straighten  the kinks out of it so as to make it more manageable. 
  2.  An Ebonic dialect of which unique colorful slang is a spinoff.  .
  3. A cuisine known as soul food (that has become demonized because it is a guilty pleasure whose sapience  stems from ingredients purportedly bad for your health.)
  4. Music genres made up of Jazz, Blues, R&B and negro spirituals.
  5. An innovative version of the card game whist which is referred to as "bid-whist", a popular pass time which was originated by and is played exclusively by black people.      

 

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AfroAmericans (I rarely use the term "African" American) invented Break Dancing and I believe the Turn Table.

I think we also invented Hot Water Corn bread and Cracklin' Bread as well as Hoe Cakes.

 



But we don't really have an actual CULTURE.
In my opinion a TRUE culture means having your own language (not merely a corrupted form of English or a mere dialect of it which is what most AfroAmericans speak); and your OWN set of social customs like marriage and family structure rather than a modified version of the Western nuclear family which most AfroAmericans TRY to practice but fail at which is one of the reasons broken and dysfunctional families as well as divorce is so high in the AfroAmerican community.
Because instead of OUR OWN culture most of our people have been trying to IMITATE White culture and haven't succeeded.




One of the reasons AfroAmerican sub-culture is so confusing is because it seems to change with each generation.
It works like this......

White culture...whether it's food, dance, music, or just the way people talk and greet eachother.... is usually too weak and watered down for most AfroAmericans, so we develop OUR OWN food, music, dances, and forms of greeting eachother.
This makes us feel more comfortable and gives us an identity....now we're cool.

But when White people see it- some of them find it repulsive and try to make it illegal or stamp it out; but most of them find it different and attractive and try to imitate it.
Once THEY get the hang of it and start imitating it whether it's music, dance, slang, etc.....it loses it's flavor and NO LONGER becomes cool.

So the next generation of AfroAmerican youth invents ANOTHER form of music, dance, greetings, ect.....to separate themselves and give themselves an identity to be cool again....and when Whites latch on to THAT then the process starts all over again.


But I do believe AfroAmericans need to STABILIZE themselves and establish a solid CULTURE of our own, because a lot of the garbage you see in the music and entertainment industries today being passed off as "Black culture" is actual degeneracy.

They have made weed smoking part of Black culture today through the music and now the media is actually trying to normalize OPEN homosexuality and queerness as a part of "Black culture" by making sure nearly all Black programs in America include it.

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@Pioneer1Your idea of culture is one that western civilization has defined and to which you have deferred just like you accuse others of doing.. The way slave descendants have coped with their environment through improvisation is their true indigenous culture. Africa has not exerted any great influence on the diaspora after centuries in this country.  People of color are made up of many blood lines that manifest themselves in unique ways. Diversity is the wave of the future because time brings change and the essence of culture is one of the things that changes.  .  

 

As for homosexuality,  it is here to stay because it has always existed, long before the media focused on it. And the media isn't injecting it into black programming any more than it is into series about whites.   If you are offended by the sexual orientation of people different from you, it means that you are not being influenced by it, so why sweat it? Get over your paranoia, and accept that there's no such thing as "normal" any more.  

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9 hours ago, Delano said:

Those people are the pimps. 

 

@Delano LOL! Now, that caught me off guard! WHEW! Hilarious. 

Okay, you got me there. 

9 hours ago, Mel Hopkins said:

We came from different parts of Africa bringing with us a lot of traditions from our native countries that were passed on and remain with us today...

 

Yes, so it seems, I am one tracked!!--in my mind. I'm thinking from the perspective of the slave yard system. 

So now, I am trying to think about just what kind of traditions, that can be something that actually has been passed on from Africa, specifically that is a part of us today...

I will take a look back at your list!

 

8 hours ago, Mel Hopkins said:

uck dancing is ours ... which all popular dances flowed - my Nana used to buck dance like nobody’s business and my mom said the real skill is when you kept a bottle between your knees while doing it...

 

@Mel Hopkins WOW!!! I learned something new today! Thank you! 

Buck dancing looks like STEPPING to me. It looks like the South African Boot Dancers too.

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6 hours ago, Pioneer1 said:

...a lot of the garbage you see in the music and entertainment industries today being passed off as "Black culture" is actual degeneracy.

 

@Pioneer1 Isn't this pretty much what @Delano said too? -- Cultural whoredom.

3 hours ago, Cynique said:

Africa has not exerted any great influence on the diaspora after centuries in this country.

 

Interesting.

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4 hours ago, Chevdove said:

It looks like the South African Boot Dancers too.

@Chevdove Oh snap! So the plot thickens! You’ve seem the dance form from South Africa!  That may be its origin!  Thank You!  

 

And yes, I was so used to the memory of my Nana’s dancing that I failed to connect it to Stepping!  When I found the youtube clip, it all connected!  

 

4 hours ago, Chevdove said:

So now, I am trying to think about just what kind of traditions, that can be something that actually has been passed on from Africa, specifically that is a part of us today...

 

Yes!  Bring it! I appreciate your definition of culture  too and all that it entails! 

 

I know some of AA cultural traditions are survival tactics as a result of being in a hostile territory  but lets celebrate all of what is uniquely African  in America ...

 

@Troy  are there any books on this topic? 

 

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@Mel Hopkins the are many writren by both Black and white scholars. One of the most accessible would be by Anthony Browder, Nile Valley Contributions to Civilization 

 

But you can also read anything by John G. Jackson. The work of folks like Cheikh Anta Diop and John Herik Clark are worth checking out too.

 

Hey @Delano at the 16:20 mark Browder discusses the African Origin of the Horusscope (my term). @Mel Hopkins at the 21:25 minute mark Browder talks about the Adrican origin of the Holy Trinity.

 

 

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Chev

Pioneer1 Isn't this pretty much what @Delano said too? -- Cultural whoredom.


Lol, there is NO WAY in the world I'm going to sit up here and try to figure out what Delano is saying or what he means.
I will say this though......

In my opinion "whoredom" is strictly in the realm of prostitution or selling sex for money which isn't necessarily a bad thing as far as I'm concerned.
Selling aspects of your culture for money may or may not be a bad thing but it shouldn't be called "whoredom".




Cynique



Your idea of culture is one that western civilization has defined and to which you have deferred just like you accuse others of doing.. The way slave descendants have coped with their environment through improvisation is their true indigenous culture

Perhaps my idea of culture IS one that Western civilization has defined.
I don't disagree with EVERYTHING about Western civilization, they do tend to get some things correct.

In my opinion "coping" with the environment you find yourself in isn't enough to define it as a culture.
People in prisons and hospitals usually learn to "cope" with their environment, but the behavior they adopt isn't the same as an entire nation of people who have developed their own language, marriage customs, family structure, and architecture.
Like I said, much of what AfroAmericans practice is just a modified or corrupted version of what Caucasian Americans practice.

 


 


Diversity is the wave of the future because time brings change and the essence of culture is one of the things that changes. .


Don't confuse DI-versity with PER-versity and the attempt to normalize that which is unnatural.

 

 

 

As for homosexuality, it is here to stay because it has always existed, long before the media focused on it. And the media isn't injecting it into black programming any more than it is into series about whites. If you are offended by the sexual orientation of people different from you, it means that you are not being influenced by it, so why sweat it


No one is questioning the existence of homosexuality in human history.
My point is that BEFORE coming into contact with Caucasians, homosexuality was usually either rmarginalized or hidden in various African cultures and societies.  It was generally seen as abnormal and unacceptable.

Today there is a PUSH (by Caucasians) to normalize it and make it acceptable in various African societies.

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1 hour ago, Pioneer1 said:

No one is questioning the existence of homosexuality in human history.
My point is that BEFORE coming into contact with Caucasians, homosexuality was usually either rmarginalized or hidden in various African cultures and societies.  It was generally seen as abnormal and unacceptable.

Today there is a PUSH (by Caucasians) to normalize it and make it acceptable in various African societies.

Well, you point is your opinion and your have not substantiated your speculation with any facts or references, so what you claim is just a case of you bitching about something that irritates you.  

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6 minutes ago, Cynique said:

 just a case of you bitching about something that irritates you.  



Now that's a lie!

NOT only haven't I complained but I haven't so much as even mentioned YOUR name....lol.

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@Pioneer1You have, indeed, complained.  What else do you call your constant  harping about homosexuality being foisted upon black people by the media. You bitch so much about this that it's almost as if you are trying to convince yourself that you aren't being turned on by the thought of a male lover, thanks to the frequent exposure to this.   

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4 hours ago, Troy said:

Hey @Delano at the 16:20 mark Browder

Thanks the music is from Oliver Nelson's album Black Brown and Beautiful at the 16:20 mark. I don't know if what he is saying is true though. The sign names are in English. 

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A fellow astrologer mentioned that the Egyptian week was ten days. Which would be a decan. And most likely it was 10 degrees not ten days. Which would explain why Lions and cats are important. The Nile flooded when Sirius rises which would corresponds with Leo. However you have to take procession into account. I looked at this a few years back, but Egyptian astrology isn't my strong point or focus. 

2 hours ago, Pioneer1 said:


Lol, there is NO WAY in the world I'm going to sit up here and try to figure out what Delano is saying or what he means

Thanks 

17 hours ago, Pioneer1 said:

AfroAmericans (I rarely use the term "African" American) invented Break Dancing and I believe the Turn Table

How did you come to this conclusion? 

Okay may be a Bantu word. Although I have no reference or source. 

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16 hours ago, Mel Hopkins said:

Oh snap! So the plot thickens! You’ve seem the dance form from South Africa!  That may be its origin!  Thank You!  

 

And yes, I was so used to the memory of my Nana’s dancing that I failed to connect it to Stepping!  When I found the youtube clip, it all connected!  

 

@Mel Hopkins Yes, it is interesting! I have been thinking about this all day, off and on and finally, I completely made a correlation to what you said about your grandmother's rendition and how someone can do this type of dance keeping a bottle between their knees. It took me awhile to think...until it hit me!!!

 

In college, a professional dancer from the Alvin Haley school came to teach us the 'African Boot Dance' for a play production of 'Raisin in the Sun' and so, I auditioned and made the dance team! And, I came to realize this aspect of the dance! wow! I don't believe that I could do that well, but I can absolutely see someone doing this Buck dancing well enough to keep a bottle between the knees. The whole time the dance is done, yes!!!--your knees are pretty much parallel! The lead dancer would shout KEEYAH! and then we would go into another dance pattern and the drums would change rhythm throughout the dance. I really loved doing that dance and being apart of the play. Years later, I couldn't believe it but, I saw 'Mr. Rodgers' on Mr Rodgers Neighborhood do the South African Boot Dance. Man! I was amazed! He was all into the dance and he was serious. Then, I saw a documentary and WOW, I saw the South African workers come out of the industrial building and they had on their work boots and Man!!! It was unreal...

16 hours ago, Mel Hopkins said:

Yes!  Bring it! I appreciate your definition of culture  too and all that it entails! 

 

I know some of AA cultural traditions are survival tactics as a result of being in a hostile territory  but lets celebrate all of what is uniquely African  in America ...

 

Yes, thank you! 

 

So, I looked back over the first post and now, I am wondering about something in that it may be before the Colonial times as well as being incorporated into the slave times. Until you started this thread, I never considered that some things we do today may have already been brought over here from AFrica and we may not realize it.

 

I am thinking about this-- YAMS!

 

I remember reading about the major Yam Festivals held in South Africa and I read about how many of these people were brought over here as slaves, but now, I am thinking that many of these Africans were already over here in America, way before slavery times! Many of them were 'Native Americans' way before many more of their kind came byway of slavery. Today, we eat YAMS and it is a major part of our Soul Food dinner and for New Years and etc.! 

12 hours ago, Pioneer1 said:

Don't confuse DI-versity with PER-versity and the attempt to normalize that which is unnatural.

 

@Pioneer1 Thank you.

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On 5/2/2019 at 11:41 PM, Chevdove said:

I remember reading about the major Yam Festivals held in South Africa and I read about how many of these people were brought over here as slaves, but now, I am thinking that many of these Africans were already over here in America, way before slavery times! Many of them were 'Native Americans' way before many more of their kind came byway of slavery. Today, we eat YAMS and it is a major part of our Soul Food dinner and for New Years and etc.! 


@ChevdoveI know crop diversity in farming is absolutely is part of the african american culture! AND I'm not  a farmer! But seriously all one has to do is look to the celebration of George Washington Carver's genius and know that he got those skills from mama an n'em!

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On 5/2/2019 at 4:40 PM, Chevdove said:

@Pioneer1 Isn't this pretty much what @Delano said too? -- Cultural whoredom

The prostitute works the pimp collects. 

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On 5/1/2019 at 8:08 PM, Pioneer1 said:

But we don't really have an actual CULTURE.
In my opinion a TRUE culture means having your own language (not merely a corrupted form of English or a mere dialect of it which is what most AfroAmericans speak); and your OWN set of social customs like marriage and family structure 

@Pioneer1  have you ever heard of the Tuareg tribe of  North Africa?  Well, Today,  some African American women model that culture when it comes to marriage and family structure.   I suspect they may not even know it. 

The Tuareg tribe is indigenous to the region and some cultural anthropologist believe they were the original Moors.  I say this to repeat there was not ONE culture in Africa but many.  As I mentioned to @Chevdove another purpose of this thread is to see how those cultural artifacts came to America to define African American culture...

Keep in mind, The Tuareg tribe does not follow a matriarchal system.  And that's important to note because some folks believe Africans were matriarchal at one point in history but there's no evidence that matriarchy ever existed anywhere in Africa's social system.  I think they confuse it with Matrilineality  which did and does exist.

The Tuaregs  are a matrilineal tribe.  Matrilineal system is something you'll find throughout many cultures including the First Nation here in North America, Middle East's Hebrews, Jews; parts of Asia including India, and the African continent et al

So stretch your mind a bit -

For example,  although offering water to strangers is something I do - even those who work in my home;  it is also a cultural trait of the Tuareg Tribe.  I also believe that is something unique to the African American culture. What if we started that?  And that's why separate water fountains in Jim Crow south was symbolic.   -  Something as benign as offering water to strangers might just be uniquely African and widespread throughout the continent - and used against us here in America.   


 

 

On 5/2/2019 at 8:39 AM, Troy said:

Adrican origin of the Holy Trinity.


@Troy  I look forward to checking this out.  I often wonder  if one tribe co-opted ISIS, HORUS, OSIRIS - or if  they just  believed the same thing but in different ways..  Ethiopians believe Jesus is God  - whereas the Roman Catholics believe they are a separate entity. Their church name "Tewahedo" means "being made one".   I agree appropriation exists but we are talking about tribes with different languages and / or dialects back in the day. They could have all simply worshipped the Sun, Moon, Constellations and then anthropomorphized all of it …and that's what Africans could have brought to America (Kanye shrugs).

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The calendar. the days of the week and religion are all astrological. 

As are the words consider and disaster. 

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@Mel Hopkins I don't know enough about the subject to shed much more light.  However Christianity is derivative from Judaism.  Jesus was a Jewish dude preaching to other Jews right? Judaism itself is derived from much older systems and beliefs based in Africa. Obviously, since modern day "middle east" is in Africa.

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On 5/5/2019 at 9:15 AM, Mel Hopkins said:

if one tribe co-opted ISIS, HORUS, OSIRIS - or if  they just  believed the same thing but in different ways.. 

 

Me too. I do believe that over a long period of time, there are many stories that have been fused together.

 

On 5/5/2019 at 9:15 AM, Mel Hopkins said:

Ethiopians believe Jesus is God  - whereas the Roman Catholics believe they are a separate entity.

 

@Mel Hopkins -- You know, I sometimes am looking over my shoulder for someone to rebuke me when this subject comes up because I know the tension it brought up back in the day of Constantine. There are schisms and then there are other kinds of differences, but these people wanted to fight over  a schism. Nevertheless, I believe that many people did not have script back in those days and this may have been part of the probome. Jesus is quoted to have said "My father" many times, and then he also said, "I and he are one"; something like that. IMO, that is no different than me sending out my offspring to represent me, and could be viewed in various ways. 

 

On 5/5/2019 at 9:15 AM, Mel Hopkins said:

Their church name "Tewahedo" means "being made one".

 

Oh Wow! Thank you for the interpretation. I thought it also meant 'Theodore'?

 

On 5/2/2019 at 8:39 AM, Troy said:

at the 21:25 minute mark Browder talks about the Adrican origin of the Holy Trinity.

 

@Troy This film was about an hour! But, I watched it and feel that it needs to be updated for several reasons. For one example, Browder mentions John Henry Clark, Ivan Van Sertima and Dr. Hibbard and they completely disagree on many topics brought up in this film.

 

The late Ivan VAn Sertima brought out that NEFERTITI is not Black at all. And my research supports him. Even though many AFrica people have been deceived to believe otherwise, she was as her name includes, HITTITE [i.e. W-HITE]. 

 

Any Art History major will show that this film has posted images of statues that do not at all reflect the subject at hand. For instance the bust in GErmany of Nefertiti HAD NO COMPLETE HEAD. This head was fashioned in moder times. So the fuss about this is so off point. However, numerous statues, NAKED STATUES of Nefertiti were found in many places that reflect her fertility cult.

 

Regarding the HOLY TRINITY that I hear a lot, the statue presented was made over a thousand years before this HOLY TRINITY concept came about. 

but the very story in that THE SON ATTACKS THE FATHER is the clue in that this has nothing to do with the HOLY TRINITY.

The origin of the ancient TRIAD CONFLICT stems from CAIN and SETH and that is why the father is called EVIL SET.

 

The Cainites and the Sethites struggled for a long time. And, the Cainites were the more dominant and oppressed the Sethites in the SOUTHWORLD. 

Browder speaks about NARMER being NUBIAN. No. Narmer was part Nubian. He was an eastern Cainite man, a Black man, that came up from Upper Egypt and fought against the Asiatics in Lower Egypt [north]. But he later married a Khety woman and this conflict started all over again until the FIRST SETH DYNASTY-- the 4TH DYNASTY formed.

 

Until the Seth Dynasty, the city-civilization was defined as A DUAL SYSTEM and that is part of the meaning of the two-pylon gate construction. But the Cainites were more dominant. The system was known all over the world later by this standard that begin with being known as ENOCH-ENOCH. 

 

But then, the Seth-Theban kings began to marry Eastern women too and then they became oppressed all over again...

 

So, this is part of how the HOLY TRINITY  was viewed in ancient times, based on my research, but more importantly, the 'virgin aspect' was added; it is a fabrication.

 

The Seth world knew that 'EMNITY' [ie. Jesu] would come soon, and although the adversary would 'bruise his heel', however, 'emnity' [IE HOSTILITY] would bruise his HEAD [ie the ROMAN EMPIRE--GOVERNMENT]. So this HOLY TRINITY story was well know way back when and was the basis for BLACK-VS-BLACK hostility and White Supremacist Exploitation. 

 

The problem with many of these documentaries put out by AFrican type people is that they completely omit the true aspect in that there were Wite people in ancient Egypt and, these kinds of Black scholars continue to omit the part of ancient Black people who welcomed in these White people and obsessed over them. Today, Black people want to put the blame solely on White people infiltration of ancient Egypt and this is wrong. And, the aspect of 'EVIL SETH' actually stems from a Black woman who was by far, NOT A VIRGIN, and who decieved her Black husband, A SETH MAN and whose son, she bore, became a major aspect of the ancient method of how White Supremacy became established in ancient Egypt.

 

So, the Heru or HORUS, represents the story of Noah and how his wife decieved him and gave birth to the Canaanites and this also ties into the RIDDLE OF THE SPHINX of which, was another false interpretation in this film. 

 

The massive project to uncover the sphinx during the 18th Dynasty of the Thutmosis was because Thutmosis IV married a WHITE WOMAN, Mitemwiya and for many past thousands of years, there was a conflict over this SPHINX in Egypt with regards to the Northworld people and the Southworld people [Seth world people]. 

 

 

  [15] And I will put enmity between thee and the woman, and between thy seed and her seed; it shall bruise thy head, and thou shalt bruise his heel.
GENESIS 3:15.

 

 

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Mel

have you ever heard of the Tuareg tribe of North Africa? Well, Today, some African American women model that culture when it comes to marriage and family structure. I suspect they may not even know it.
The Tuareg tribe is indigenous to the region and some cultural anthropologist believe they were the original Moors.

 

Yes, I've heard of the Taureg but they aren't TRULY indigenous to North Africa.
They...like other so-called "Berber" tribes are actually a mixed group who are the descendants of the Caucasians and the original Black Africans who were the true original Moors.
Many centuries before the Arabs invaded North Africa Caucasians from the Mediterranian area invaded the northern coast of Africa founding cities like Carthage and they mixed in with the original Black African tribes who were there and many cultures blended.

You see a lot of dark skinned and Black Tuareg today, but they come from a mixed ancestry originally based on racist domination of the Black women by the Caucasian men.....like most Arabs.  And like the Arabs again, the fact that many of these "berber" tribes wear turbans and veils to cover up their face and protect their skin from the sun may be part of their current culture and style but it actually evidence that they are descended from a people not meant for that environment.

As far as their family structure....

I'm not sure that the family structure AfroAmerican women are practicing is the same as the Taureg.

As you said, there is a difference between MATRIARCHAL and MATRILINIAL.
Matrinlineal simply means the ancestry is traced through the woman and her family instead of the man's and as you pointed out many peoples around the world practice this, including the Jews.  It just makes more sense to do this anyway since you can actually see the woman giving birth to the child as solid proof of where it came from.
It's Mama's baby....but Papa's...maybe.

But what's being practiced in most AfroAmerican household is Matriarchy.
The woman or mother is actually in charge and running the show....mainly because there is no alpha male in the household. This isn't the case with the Taureg who just focus their bloodlines through the woman but the men are still head of the households.

 

 

 

 

 

Troy

Judaism itself is derived from much older systems and beliefs based in Africa.


I used to believe this, but based on my studies I no longer think this is the case

While the original Torah that Moses brought was heavily based on ancient Kemetic science and laws, the religion of Judaism as we know it today is based largely on Babylonian mythology.
There is a strong connection between Judaism and Zoroastrianism....both of which came out of the Babylonian/Persian empires.

Now you may believe that ancient Babylon and Persia which are called Iraq and Iran today are still North East Africa.....but those who FOUNDED these empires considered themselves Aryans.

 

 

 



Cynique

What else do you call your constant harping about homosexuality being foisted upon black people by the media.


It's called being AWARE of a problem and CALLING ATTENTION to it.
Noticing patterns is a critical part of understanding what's going on in your environment so that you can spot potential dangers and alert others of them.

 

 



Del

How did you come to this conclusion?

Okay may be a Bantu word. Although I have no reference or source.


Why would you need a reference or source for something that was actually happening in YOUR vicinity and environment?

Break Dancing, the Turn Table, and other aspects of Hiphop as well as Hiphop itself was born in The Bronx back in the 70s.
If you're over 50 and from The Bronx you should have been WITNESS to atleast some of this.



Chev @Chevdove


Thank you.


You're welcome sis!
 

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11 minutes ago, Pioneer1 said:

While the original Torah that Moses brought was heavily based on ancient Kemetic science, the religion of Judaism as we know it today is based largely on Babylonian mythology.

 

OK @Pioneer1 where was Babylon located?

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2 minutes ago, Troy said:

 

OK @Pioneer1 where was Babylon located?


You posted this while I was editing my post.

When you said the middle east was Africa I anticipated what would be your counter argument...lol

Re-read my edited post and it MAY answer your question!

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34 minutes ago, Pioneer1 said:

Why would you need a reference or source for something that was actually happening in YOUR vicinity and environment

Because I don't make snit up and then believe it to be the truth. 

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Just now, Delano said:

Because I don't make snit up and then believe it to be the truth. 


Well if something is happening in YOUR community in front of you and you STILL don't trust whether or not it's real and need "references" and "sources" to verify what you're looking at......it sounds like you don't trust your own senses.

Do you have a history of hallucination and delusion where what you thought was real turned out to be false?
 

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1 hour ago, Pioneer1 said:

Break Dancing, the Turn Table, and other aspects of Hiphop as well as Hiphop itself was born in The Bronx back in the 70s.
If you're over 50 and from The Bronx you should have been WITNESS to atleast some of this.


Thomas Edison invented the phonograph in 1877 and thus was known for who invented the record player. 

 

So while I was there for the birth of hip hop. I did a little mixing, scratching and rapping in the basement. Also saw some of the founding fathers and mothers of Hiphop. The record player pre-dates me by about a century. 

Do you believe the turntable was created in the 1970's instead of the 1870's. 

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12 hours ago, Pioneer1 said:

But what's being practiced in most AfroAmerican household is Matriarchy.
The woman or mother is actually in charge and running the show....mainly because there is no alpha male in the household. This isn't the case with the Taureg who just focus their bloodlines through the woman but the men are still head of the households.

 

@Pioneer1 a mother responsible for the financial well-being of her children is not a matriarchy. Nor does that qualify as a social/political/financial system. It's simply called survival. 

For matriarchy to exist it would have to be a social system. At present one does not; nor has ever existed.  Even in the UK with Queen Elizabeth currently reigning, it's still a monarchy not matriarchy. 

But back to my original point' since the Tuareg Tribe still maintain a lot of their socio- cultural system - it is easy to trace their activities to some Africans who live in America.

If I didn't make myself clear - I was specifically referring to some African American women and how they CHOOSE to live that mirrors the Tuareg Women.

 As for the Tuareg tribes, their history reveals they are indigenous to Africa -  but this brings us back to appropriation . 

I'm hoping this thread will shed light on what is unique to Africa and what we brought with us - not some european historian saying the Berbers were "white"...Sure we've always married other ethnic groups - but that doesn't change who is indigenous to the land.  

 Tuareg tribes exist in egalitarianism-matrilineal model of culture. NOT patriarchal which is a social political system that's been in place for about 15,000 years; a lot of it due to colonialism. 

As for Alpha "men"  I don't even know what that means.  If you're making a comparison to wolves ...that report has since been discredited because the "researcher" only observed wolves in captivity but not the wolves who are free.  It appears when wolves are enslaved they become aggressive - and go crazy.  They  attempt to dominate something or someone since something or someone is dominating them.

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Del

 

I did a little mixing, scratching and rapping in the basement.

Yeah, you might want to keep your early sexual experiences to yourself....................
 

 

Also saw some of the founding fathers and mothers of Hiphop. The record player pre-dates me by about a century.

Do you believe the turntable was created in the 1970's instead of the 1870's.


In my original statement I said Break Dancing was invented back then but that I  BELIEVED that the Turntable was.
Although I'm not a musician I thought the Turntable that DJs currently use was a different type of instrument than just a normal record player.

What about Break Dancing?
Lol, do you want to give a White man credit for inventing THIS 100 years before also????



Mel


a mother responsible for the financial well-being of her children is not a matriarchy. Nor does that qualify as a social/political/financial system. It's simply called survival.


When it becomes the dominant form of family structure in a given community (which it has in the AfroAmerican community) then it INDEED qualifies as being systemic.
The AfroAmerican community today is officially a MATRIARCHY in which the average or typical family is governed by the mother.




For matriarchy to exist it would have to be a social system. At present one does not; nor has ever existed.

It does indeed exist in the AfroAmerican community and it was FORMED by and being MAINTAINED by Caucasians from outside of that community by:
-Systemically incarcerating, economically depriving, and in many cases killing adult Black males so that they are no longer part of the average Black family beyond early adulthood.
-Systemically sustaining Black women and their children through various government assistance and charitable programs that allow Black women and children to survive without the Black males they would ordinarily need for their protection and provisionary needs under normal more natural conditions.

This is why you don't see matriarchies in Africa or any other place where Blacks predominate outside of the United States.
Because the artificial conditions being used to form and maintain this matriarchy aren't being introduced in those communities to the extent that they are in the United States.


 

 

As for Alpha "men" I don't even know what that means. 
 

A human male who is dominant in attitude and behavior and not only attempts to accumulate wealth and women but also fights to protect that wealth and those women.
Also most alpha men tend to compete strongly with other men for dominance

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Brought over from this thread
 

On 5/8/2019 at 4:52 AM, Delano said:

The last two posts sound like you are battling .


"I stand alone on a pedestal
and even betta still
my mic is hyper than hype
if you like I'll take you to a level of heights domain
where I dwell excel, drive you all insane 

cause no man or band or clan can rock fans
or stand beside MCM  'cause I am
the incredible, unforgettable,  A capella dwella
like Spinderella, I''m not a fella
but Imma ass-kickin' hellafied microphone high
take it to heart when I start to perform, I
can knock a brother's rep down, make em wanna step down …
even a cutie is bootie cause he slept now" ~ I do Damage



@Delano you're right! Good Ear!!!. That was shaping up to be a rap battle!  This is a verse from my past.   Like you mentioned in the African American Culture thread "call and response" is our from our culture as Is "the dozens" much of which  dates back to GRIOTS from West Africa.

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