52 Books Published by The New Press on Our Site — Book Cover Mosaic

Click for more detail about Remembering Slavery: African Americans Talk about Their Personal Experiences of Slavery and Emancipation by Ira Berlin, Marc Favreau, and Steven F. Miller Remembering Slavery: African Americans Talk about Their Personal Experiences of Slavery and Emancipation

by Ira Berlin, Marc Favreau, and Steven F. Miller
The New Press (Sep 07, 2021)
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Revision of 1998 groundbreaking, bestselling history of slavery, with a new foreword by Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Annette Gordon-Reed

Listen to the Introduction to this moving and important work.

“As vital and necessary a historical document as anyone has ever produced in this country.” —The Boston Globe

With the publication of the 1619 Project and the national reckoning over racial inequality, the story of slavery has gripped America’s imagination—and conscience—once again.

No group of people better understood the power of slavery’s legacies than the last generation of American people who had lived as slaves. Little-known before the first publication of Remembering Slavery over two decades ago, their memories were recorded on paper, and in some cases on primitive recording devices, by WPA workers in the 1930s. A major publishing event, Remembering Slavery captured these extraordinary voices in a single volume for the first time, presenting them as an unprecedented, first-person history of slavery in America.

Remembering Slavery received the kind of commercial attention seldom accorded projects of this nature—nationwide reviews as well as extensive coverage on prime-time television, including Good Morning America, Nightline, CBS Sunday Morning, and CNN. Reviewers called the book "chilling … and] riveting" (Publishers Weekly) and "something, truly, truly new" (The Village Voice).

With a new foreword by Pulitzer Prize-winning scholar Annette Gordon-Reed, this new edition of Remembering Slavery is an essential text for anyone seeking to understand one of the most basic and essential chapters in our collective history.

With the publication of the 1619 Project and the national reckoning over racial inequality, the story of slavery has gripped America’s imagination—and conscience—once again.

No group of people better understood the power of slavery’s legacies than the last generation of American people who had lived as slaves. Little-known before the first publication of Remembering Slavery over two decades ago, their memories were recorded on paper, and in some cases on primitive recording devices, by WPA workers in the 1930s. A major publishing event, Remembering Slavery captured these extraordinary voices in a single volume for the first time, presenting them as an unprecedented, first-person history of slavery in America.

Remembering Slavery received the kind of commercial attention seldom accorded projects of this nature—nationwide reviews as well as extensive coverage on prime-time television, including Good Morning America, Nightline, CBS Sunday Morning, and CNN. Reviewers called the book "chilling … and] riveting" (Publishers Weekly) and "something, truly, truly new" (The Village Voice).

With a new foreword by Pulitzer Prize-winning scholar Annette Gordon-Reed, this new edition of Remembering Slavery is an essential text for anyone seeking to understand one of the most basic and essential chapters in our collective history.

Related Links

Frederick Douglass Slave Narratives
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Josiah Henson
Margaret Garner
Jacob Stroyer


Click for more detail about Mouths of Rain: An Anthology of Black Lesbian Thought by Briona Simone Jones Mouths of Rain: An Anthology of Black Lesbian Thought

by Briona Simone Jones
The New Press (Feb 23, 2021)
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A groundbreaking collection tracing the history of intellectual thought by Black Lesbian writers, in the tradition of The New Press’s perennial seller Words of Fire

African American lesbian writers and theorists have made extraordinary contributions to feminist theory, activism, and writing. Mouths of Rain, the companion anthology to Beverly Guy-Sheftall’s classic Words of Fire, traces the long history of intellectual thought produced by Black Lesbian writers, spanning the nineteenth century through the twenty-first century.

Using "Black Lesbian" as a capacious signifier, Mouths of Rain includes writing by Black women who have shared intimate and loving relationships with other women, as well as Black women who see bonding as mutual, Black women who have self-identified as lesbian, Black women who have written about Black Lesbians, and Black women who theorize about and see the word lesbian as a political descriptor that disrupts and critiques capitalism, heterosexism, and heteropatriarchy. Taking its title from a poem by Audre Lorde, Mouths of Rain addresses pervasive issues such as misogynoir and anti-blackness while also attending to love, romance, "coming out," and the erotic.

Contributors include:
Barbara Smith
Beverly Smith
Bettina Love
Dionne Brand
Cheryl Clarke
Cathy J. Cohen
Angelina Weld Grimke
Alexis Pauline Gumbs
Audre Lorde
Dawn Lundy Martin
Pauli Murray
Michelle Parkerson
Mecca Jamilah Sullivan
Alice Walker
Jewelle Gomez


Click for more detail about The Perfect Nine: The Epic of Gĩkũyũ And Mũmbi by Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o The Perfect Nine: The Epic of Gĩkũyũ And Mũmbi

by Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o
The New Press (Oct 06, 2020)
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Longlisted for the 2021 International Booker Prize

A dazzling, genre-defying novel in verse from the author Delia Owens says "tackles the absurdities, injustices, and corruption of a continent"

Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o’s novels and memoirs have received glowing praise from the likes of President Barack Obama, the New Yorker, the New York Times Book Review, The Guardian, and NPR; he has been a finalist for the Man International Booker Prize and is annually tipped to win the Nobel Prize for Literature; and his books have sold tens of thousands of copies around the world.

In his first attempt at the epic form, Ngũgĩ tells the story of the founding of the Gĩkũyũ people of Kenya, from a strongly feminist perspective. A verse narrative, blending folklore, mythology, adventure, and allegory, The Perfect Nine chronicles the efforts the Gĩkũyũ founders make to find partners for their ten beautiful daughters—called "The Perfect Nine" —and the challenges they set for the 99 suitors who seek their hands in marriage. The epic has all the elements of adventure, with suspense, danger, humor, and sacrifice.

Ngũgĩ’s epic is a quest for the beautiful as an ideal of living, as the motive force behind migrations of African peoples. He notes, "The epic came to me one night as a revelation of ideals of quest, courage, perseverance, unity, family; and the sense of the divine, in human struggles with nature and nurture."


Click for more detail about Democracy, If We Can Keep It: The Aclu’s 100-Year Fight for Rights in America by Ellis Cose Democracy, If We Can Keep It: The Aclu’s 100-Year Fight for Rights in America

by Ellis Cose
The New Press (Jul 07, 2020)
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Published to coincide with the ACLU’s centennial, a major new book by the nationally celebrated journalist and bestselling author

For a century, the American Civil Liberties Union has fought to keep Americans in touch with the founding values of the Constitution. As its centennial approached, the organization invited Ellis Cose to become its first ever writer-in-residence, with complete editorial independence.

The result is Cose’s groundbreaking Democracy, If We Can Keep It: The ACLU’s 100-Year Fight for Rights in America, the most authoritative account ever of America’s premier defender of civil liberties. A vivid work of history and journalism, Democracy, If We Can Keep It is not just the definitive story of the ACLU but also an essential account of America’s rediscovery of rights it had granted but long denied. Cose’s narrative begins with World War I and brings us to today, chronicling the ACLU’s role through the horrors of 9/11, the saga of Edward Snowden, and the phenomenon of Donald Trump.

A chronicle of America’s most difficult ethical quandaries from the Red Scare, the Scottsboro Boys’ trials, Japanese American internment, McCarthyism, and Vietnam, Democracy, If We Can Keep It weaves these accounts into a deeper story of American freedom—one that is profoundly relevant to our present moment.


Click for more detail about The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness  by Michelle Alexander The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness

by Michelle Alexander
The New Press (Jan 07, 2020)
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Once in a great while a book comes along that changes the way we see the world and helps to fuel a nationwide social movement. The New Jim Crow is such a book. Praised by Harvard Law professor Lani Guinier as "brave and bold," this book directly challenges the notion that the election of Barack Obama signals a new era of colorblindness.

With dazzling candor, legal scholar Michelle Alexander argues that "we have not ended racial caste in America; we have merely redesigned it." By targeting black men through the War on Drugs and decimating communities of color, the U.S. criminal justice system functions as a contemporary system of racial control—relegating millions to a permanent second-class status, even as it formally adheres to the principle of colorblindness.

In the words of Benjamin Todd Jealous, president and CEO of the NAACP, this book is a "call to action."

Book Review

Click for more detail about Lies Across America: What Our Historic Sites Get Wrong by James W. Loewen Lies Across America: What Our Historic Sites Get Wrong

by James W. Loewen
The New Press (Sep 24, 2019)
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A fully updated and revised edition of the book USA Today called "jim-dandy pop history," by the bestselling, American Book Award-winning author

"The most definitive and expansive work on the Lost Cause and the movement to whitewash history."
—Mitch Landrieu, former mayor of New Orleans

From the author of the national bestseller Lies My Teacher Told Me, a completely updated—and more timely than ever—version of the myth-busting history book that focuses on the inaccuracies, myths, and lies on monuments, statues, national landmarks, and historical sites all across America.

In Lies Across America, James W. Loewen continues his mission, begun in the award-winning Lies My Teacher Told Me, of overturning the myths and misinformation that too often pass for American history. This is a one-of-a-kind examination of historic sites all over the country where history is literally written on the landscape, including historical markers, monuments, historic houses, forts, and ships. New changes and updates include:

- a town in Louisiana that was the site of a major but now-forgotten enslaved persons’ uprising

- a totally revised tour of the memory and intentional forgetting of slavery and the Civil War in Richmond, Virginia

- the hideout of a gang in Delaware that made money by kidnapping free blacks and selling them into slavery

Entertaining and enlightening, Lies Across America also has a serious role to play in contemporary debates about white supremacy and Confederate memorials.


Click for more detail about Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything American History Textbooks Get Wrong (Young Readers’) by James W. Loewen Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything American History Textbooks Get Wrong (Young Readers’)

by James W. Loewen
The New Press (Apr 23, 2019)
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Now adapted for young readers ages 12 through 18, the national bestseller that makes real American history come alive in all of its conflict, drama, and complexity

Lies My Teacher Told Me is one of the most important—and successful—history books of our time. Having sold nearly two million copies, the book won an American Book Award and the Oliver Cromwell Cox Award for Distinguished Anti-Racist Scholarship. Now Rebecca Stefoff, the acclaimed nonfiction children’s writer who adapted Howard Zinn’s bestseller A People’s History of the United States for young readers, makes Loewen’s beloved work available to younger students.

Essential reading in our age of fake news and slippery, sloppy history, Lies My Teacher Told Me: Young Readers’ Edition cuts through the mindless optimism and outright lies found in most textbooks that are often not even really written by their "authors." Loewen is, as historian Carol Kammen has said, the history teacher we all should have had. Beginning with pre-Columbian history and then covering characters and events as diverse as the first Thanksgiving, Helen Keller, the My Lai massacre, 9/11, and the Iraq War, Loewen’s lively, provocative telling of American history is a "counter-textbook that retells the story of the American past" (The Nation).

This streamlined young readers’ edition is rich in vivid details and quotations from primary sources that poke holes in the textbook versions of history and help students develop a deeper understanding of our world. Lies My Teacher Told Me: Young Readers’ Edition brings this classic text to a new generation of readers (and their parents and teachers) who will welcome and value its honesty, its humor, and its integrity.


Click for more detail about Thick: And Other Essays by Tressie McMillan Cottom Thick: And Other Essays

by Tressie McMillan Cottom
The New Press (Jan 08, 2019)
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As featured by The Daily Show, NPR, PBS, CBC, Time, VIBE, Entertainment Weekly, Well-Read Black Girl, and Chris Hayes, "incisive, witty, and provocative essays" (Publishers Weekly) by one of the "most bracing thinkers on race, gender, and capitalism of our time" (Rebecca Traister)

"Thick is sure to become a classic." —The New York Times Book Review

In eight highly praised treatises on beauty, media, money, and more, Tressie McMillan Cottom—award-winning professor and acclaimed author of Lower Ed—is unapologetically "thick" deemed "thick where I should have been thin, more where I should have been less," McMillan Cottom refuses to shy away from blending the personal with the political, from bringing her full self and voice to the fore of her analytical work. Thick "transforms narrative moments into analyses of whiteness, black misogyny, and status-signaling as means of survival for black women" (Los Angeles Review of Books) with "writing that is as deft as it is amusing" (Darnell L. Moore).

This "transgressive, provocative, and brilliant" (Roxane Gay) collection cements McMillan Cottom’s position as a public thinker capable of shedding new light on what the "personal essay" can do. She turns her chosen form into a showcase for her critical dexterity, investigating everything from Saturday Night Live, LinkedIn, and BBQ Becky to sexual violence, infant mortality, and Trump rallies.

Collected in an indispensable volume that speaks to the everywoman and the erudite alike, these unforgettable essays never fail to be "painfully honest and gloriously affirming" and hold "a mirror to your soul and to that of America" (Dorothy Roberts).


Click for more detail about Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong by James W. Loewen Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong

by James W. Loewen
The New Press (Jul 31, 2018)
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"Every teacher, every student of history, every citizen should read this book. It is both a refreshing antidote to what has passed for history in our educational system and a one-volume education in itself."
—Howard Zinn

A new edition of the national bestseller and American Book Award winner, with a new preface by the author

Since its first publication in 1995, Lies My Teacher Told Me has become one of the most important—and successful—history books of our time. Having sold nearly two million copies, the book also won an American Book Award and the Oliver Cromwell Cox Award for Distinguished Anti-Racist Scholarship and was heralded on the front page of the New York Times in the summer of 2006.

For this new edition, Loewen has added a new preface that shows how inadequate history courses in high school help produce adult Americans who think Donald Trump can solve their problems, and calls out academic historians for abandoning the concept of truth in a misguided effort to be "objective."

What started out as a survey of the twelve leading American history textbooks has ended up being what the San Francisco Chronicle calls "an extremely convincing plea for truth in education." In Lies My Teacher Told Me, James W. Loewen brings history alive in all its complexity and ambiguity. Beginning with pre-Columbian history and ranging over characters and events as diverse as Reconstruction, Helen Keller, the first Thanksgiving, the My Lai massacre, 9/11, and the Iraq War, Loewen offers an eye-opening critique of existing textbooks, and a wonderful retelling of American history as it should—and could—be taught to American students.


Click for more detail about Sundown Towns: A Hidden Dimension of American Racism by James W. Loewen Sundown Towns: A Hidden Dimension of American Racism

by James W. Loewen
The New Press (Jul 17, 2018)
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"Powerful and important … an instant classic."
The Washington Post Book World

The award-winning look at an ugly aspect of American racism by the bestselling author of Lies My Teacher Told Me, reissued with a new preface by the author

In this groundbreaking work, sociologist James W. Loewen, author of the classic bestseller Lies My Teacher Told Me, brings to light decades of hidden racial exclusion in America. In a provocative, sweeping analysis of American residential patterns, Loewen uncovers the thousands of "sundown towns"—almost exclusively white towns where it was an unspoken rule that blacks weren’t welcome—that cropped up throughout the twentieth century, most of them located outside of the South.

Written with Loewen’s trademark honesty and thoroughness, Sundown Towns won the Gustavus Myers Outstanding Book Award, received starred reviews in Publishers Weekly and Booklist, and launched a nationwide online effort to track down and catalog sundown towns across America.

In a new preface, Loewen puts this history in the context of current controversies around white supremacy and the Black Lives Matter movement. He revisits sundown towns and finds the number way down, but with notable exceptions in exclusive all-white suburbs such as Kenilworth, Illinois, which as of 2010 had not a single black household. And, although many former sundown towns are now integrated, they often face "second-generation sundown town issues," such as in Ferguson, Missouri, a former sundown town that is now majority black, but with a majority-white police force.

Book Review

Click for more detail about Lighting the Fires of Freedom: African American Women in the Civil Rights Movement by Janet Dewart Bell Lighting the Fires of Freedom: African American Women in the Civil Rights Movement

by Janet Dewart Bell
The New Press (May 08, 2018)
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A “New & Noteworthy” selection of The New York Times

One of Book Riot's “29 Amazing New Books Coming in 2018”

“There is a memoir or autobiography in each of these women. But they are perhaps too modest to lift themselves up, which is why Bell’s book is so valuable.” —The Washington Post

A groundbreaking collection based on oral histories that brilliantly plumb the leadership of African American women in the twentieth-century fight for civil rights—many nearly lost to history—from the latest winner of the Studs and Ida Terkel Prize During the Civil Rights Movement, African American women were generally not in the headlines; they simply did the work that needed to be done. Yet despite their significant contributions at all levels of the movement, they remain mostly invisible to the larger public. Beyond Rosa Parks, Coretta Scott King, and Dorothy Height, most Americans, black and white alike, would be hard-pressed to name other leaders at the community, local, and national levels.

In Lighting the Fires of Freedom Janet Dewart Bell shines a light on women’s all-too-often overlooked achievements in the Movement. Through wide-ranging conversations with nine women, several now in their nineties with decades of untold stories, we hear what ignited and fueled their activism, as Bell vividly captures their inspiring voices. Lighting the Fires of Freedom offers these deeply personal and intimate accounts of extraordinary struggles for justice that resulted in profound social change, stories that remain important and relevant today.

Published to coincide with the fiftieth anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1968, Lighting the Fires of Freedom is a vital document for understanding the Civil Rights Movement and an enduring testament to the vitality of women’s leadership during one of the most dramatic periods of American history.

Book Review

Click for more detail about A Perilous Path: Talking Race, Inequality, and the Law by Sherrilyn A. Ifill, Loretta Lynch, Bryan Stevenson, and Anthony C. Thompson A Perilous Path: Talking Race, Inequality, and the Law

by Sherrilyn A. Ifill, Loretta Lynch, Bryan Stevenson, and Anthony C. Thompson
The New Press (Mar 06, 2018)
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A no-holds-barred, red-hot discussion of race in America today from some of the leading names in the field, including the bestselling author of Just Mercy This blisteringly candid discussion of the American dilemma in the age of Trump brings together the head of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, the former attorney general of the United States, a bestselling author and death penalty lawyer, and a star professor for an honest conversation the country desperately needs to hear. Drawing on their collective decades of work on civil rights issues as well as personal histories of rising from poverty and oppression, these leading lights of the legal profession and the fight for racial justice talk about the importance of reclaiming the racial narrative and keeping our eyes on the horizon as we work for justice in an unjust time. Covering topics as varied as “the commonality of pain,” “when lawyers are heroes,” and the concept of an “equality dividend” that is due to people of color for helping America brand itself internationally as a country of diversity and acceptance, Ifill, Lynch, Stevenson, and Thompson also explore topics such as “when did ‘public’ become a dirty word” (hint, it has something to do with serving people of color), “you know what Jeff Sessions is going to say,” and “what it means to be a civil rights lawyer in the age of Trump.” Building on Stevenson’s hugely successful Just Mercy, Lynch’s national platform at the Justice Department, Ifill’s role as one of the leading defenders of civil rights in the country, and the occasion of Thompson’s launch of a new center on race, inequality, and the law at the NYU School of Law, A Perilous Path will speak loudly and clearly to everyone concerned about America’s perpetual fault line.

Book Review

Click for more detail about Wrestling with the Devil: A Prison Memoir by Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o Wrestling with the Devil: A Prison Memoir

by Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o
The New Press (Mar 06, 2018)
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A New York Times Editors’ Choice

"A welcome addition to the vast literature produced by jailed writers across the centuries . . . [a] thrilling testament to the human spirit."
—Ariel Dorfman, The New York Times Book Review

"Wrestling with the Devil is a powerful testament to the courage of Ng?g? and his fellow prisoners and validation of the hope that an independent Kenya would eventually emerge."
—Minneapolis Star Tribune

"The Ng?g? of Wrestling with the Devil called not just for adding a bit of color to the canon’s sagging shelf, but for abolition and upheaval."
—Bookforum

An unforgettable chronicle of the year the brilliant novelist and memoirist, long favored for the Nobel Prize, was thrown in a Kenyan jail without charge Wrestling with the Devil, Ng?g? wa Thiong’o’s powerful prison memoir, begins literally half an hour before his release on December 12, 1978. In one extended flashback he recalls the night, a year earlier, when armed police pulled him from his home and jailed him in Kenya’s Kam?t? Maximum Security Prison, one of the largest in Africa. There, he lives in a prison block with eighteen other political prisoners, quarantined from the general prison population. In a conscious effort to fight back the humiliation and the intended degradation of the spirit, Ng?g?—the world-renowned author of Weep Not, Child; Petals of Blood; and Wizard of the Crow—decides to write a novel on toilet paper, the only paper to which he has access, a book that will become his classic, Devil on the Cross. Written in the early 1980s and never before published in America, Wrestling with the Devil is Ng?g?’s account of the drama and the challenges of writing the novel under twenty-four-hour surveillance. He captures not only the excruciating pain that comes from being cut off from his wife and children, but also the spirit of defiance that defines hope. Ultimately, Wrestling with the Devil is a testimony to the power of imagination to help humans break free of confinement, which is truly the story of all art.


Click for more detail about The Dawn of Detroit: A Chronicle of Slavery and Freedom in the City of the Straits by Tiya Miles The Dawn of Detroit: A Chronicle of Slavery and Freedom in the City of the Straits

by Tiya Miles
The New Press (Oct 03, 2017)
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Finalist for the 2018 Frederick Douglass Book Prize

Nominated for the 2018 Zora Neale Hurston/Richard Wright Legacy Award (Nonfiction)

A New York Times ?Editor’s Choice” selection

Winner of 2018 Merle Curti Social History Award

Co-Winner of the 2018 James A. Rawley Prize

A Michigan Notable Book of 2018

A Booklist Editors’ Choice Title for 2017

?If many Americans imagine slavery essentially as a system in which black men toiled on cotton plantations, Miles upends that stereotype several times over.”
?New York Times Book Review

?[Miles] has compiled documentation that does for Detroit what the Works Progress Administration and the Federal Writers’ Project slave narratives did for other regions, primarily the South.”
?Washington Post

?[Tiya Miles] is among the best when it comes to blending artful storytelling with an unwavering sense of social justice.”
?Martha S. Jones in The Chronicle of Higher Education

?A necessary work of powerful, probing scholarship.”
?Publisher Weekly (starred)

?A book likely to stand at the head of further research into the problem of Native and African-American slavery in the north country.”
?Kirkus Reviews

From the MacArthur genius grant winner, a beautifully written and revelatory look at the slave origins of a major northern American city

Most Americans believe that slavery was a creature of the South, and that Northern states and territories provided stops on the Underground Railroad for fugitive slaves on their way to Canada. In this paradigm-shifting book, celebrated historian Tiya Miles reveals that slavery was at the heart of the Midwest’s iconic city: Detroit.

In this richly researched and eye-opening book, Miles has pieced together the experience of the unfree—both native and African American—in the frontier outpost of Detroit, a place wildly remote yet at the center of national and international conflict. Skillfully assembling fragments of a distant historical record, Miles introduces new historical figures and unearths struggles that remained hidden from view until now. The result is fascinating history, little explored and eloquently told, of the limits of freedom in early America, one that adds new layers of complexity to the story of a place that exerts a strong fascination in the media and among public intellectuals, artists, and activists.

A book that opens the door on a completely hidden past, The Dawn of Detroit is a powerful and elegantly written history, one that completely changes our understanding of slavery’s American legacy.


Click for more detail about Don’t Believe The Hype: Still Fighting Cultural Misinformation about African Americans by Farai Chideya Don’t Believe The Hype: Still Fighting Cultural Misinformation about African Americans

by Farai Chideya
The New Press (Aug 01, 2017)
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First published in 1995, Farai Chideya’s Don’t Believe the Hype became an instant classic, filling an enormous gap in what was then an emergent field and going on to sell more than 50,000 copies. Chideya exposed the various ways that media bias created and upheld inaccurate and harmful stereotypes about African Americans, and she succeeded in debunking those myths with an accessible, thoroughly researched handbook, its title inspired by the famous Public Enemy song.Now, after achieving national fame as a respected commentator on NPR, CNN, and ABC News, Chideya returns to this seminal text, offering a completely revised and updated twentieth-anniversary edition. She once again exposes the persistent reality of media bias against black America, even as new media formats proliferate and diversity rises in newsrooms, on television, and in film. This new edition highlights biased news coverage of black athletes, disaster victims, and police violence, among other subjects, with updated statistical information offering accurate counterpoints. Now a new generation of readers can benefit from a fresh, frank approach to looking at race, media, power, and culture.


Click for more detail about Chokehold: Policing Black Men by Paul Butler Chokehold: Policing Black Men

by Paul Butler
The New Press (Jul 11, 2017)
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?The most readable and provocative account of the consequences of the war on drugs since Michelle Alexander’s The New Jim Crow . . . .”
?The New York Times Book Review

Cops, politicians, and ordinary people are afraid of black men. The result is the Chokehold: laws and practices that treat every African American man like a thug. In this explosive new book, an African American former federal prosecutor shows that the system is working exactly the way it’s supposed to. Black men are always under watch, and police violence is widespread—all with the support of judges and politicians.

In his no-holds-barred style, Butler, whose scholarship has been featured on 60 Minutes, uses new data to demonstrate that white men commit the majority of violent crime in the United States. For example, a white woman is ten times more likely to be raped by a white male acquaintance than be the victim of a violent crime perpetrated by a black man. Butler also frankly discusses the problem of black on black violence and how to keep communities safer—without relying as much on police.

Chokehold powerfully demonstrates why current efforts to reform law enforcement will not create lasting change. Butler’s controversial recommendations about how to crash the system, and when it’s better for a black man to plead guilty—even if he’s innocent—are sure to be game-changers in the national debate about policing, criminal justice, and race relations.


Click for more detail about Black Moses: A Novel by Alain Mabanckou Black Moses: A Novel

by Alain Mabanckou
The New Press (Jun 06, 2017)
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LONG-LISTED FOR THE MAN BOOKER INTERNATIONAL PRIZE

A rollicking new novel described as “Oliver Twist in 1970s Africa” (Les Inrockuptibles) from “Africa’s Samuel Beckett . . . one of the continent’s greatest living writers” (The Guardian).

It’s not easy being Tokumisa Nzambe po Mose yamoyindo abotami namboka ya Bakoko. There’s that long name of his for a start, which means, "Let us thank God, the black Moses is born on the lands of the ancestors." Most people just call him Moses. Then there’s the orphanage where he lives, run by a malicious political stooge, Dieudonné Ngoulmoumako, and where he’s terrorized by two fellow orphans—the twins Songi-Songi and Tala-Tala.

But after Moses exacts revenge on the twins by lacing their food with hot pepper, the twins take Moses under their wing, escape the orphanage, and move to the bustling port town of Pointe-Noire, where they form a gang that survives on petty theft. What follows is a funny, moving, larger-than-life tale that chronicles Moses’s ultimately tragic journey through the Pointe-Noire underworld and the politically repressive world of Congo-Brazzaville in the 1970s and 80s.

Mabanckou’s vivid portrayal of Moses’s mental collapse echoes the work of Hugo, Dickens, and Brian DePalma’s Scarface, confirming Mabanckou’s status as one of our great storytellers. Black Moses is a vital new extension of his cycle of Pointe-Noire novels that stand out as one of the grandest, funniest, fictional projects of our time.


Click for more detail about Lower Ed: The Troubling Rise of For-Profit Colleges in the New Economy by Tressie McMillan Cottom Lower Ed: The Troubling Rise of For-Profit Colleges in the New Economy

by Tressie McMillan Cottom
The New Press (Feb 28, 2017)
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"The best book yet on the complex lives and choices of for-profit students."
The New York Times Book Review

As seen on The Daily Show, NPR’s Marketplace, and Fresh Air, the "powerful, chilling tale" (Carol Anderson) of higher education becoming an engine of social inequality

More than two million students are enrolled in for-profit colleges, from the small family-run operations to the behemoths brandished on billboards, subway ads, and late-night commercials. These schools have been around just as long as their bucolic not-for-profit counterparts, yet shockingly little is known about why they have expanded so rapidly in recent years—during the so-called Wall Street era of for-profit colleges.

In Lower Ed Tressie McMillan Cottom—a bold and rising public scholar, herself once a recruiter at two for-profit colleges—expertly parses the fraught dynamics of this big-money industry to show precisely how it is part and parcel of the growing inequality plaguing the country today. McMillan Cottom discloses the shrewd recruitment and marketing strategies that these schools deploy and explains how, despite the well-documented predatory practices of some and the campus closings of others, ending for-profit colleges won’t end the vulnerabilities that made them the fastest growing sector of higher education at the turn of the twenty-first century. And she doesn’t stop there.

With sharp insight and deliberate acumen, McMillan Cottom delivers a comprehensive view of postsecondary for-profit education by illuminating the experiences of the everyday people behind the shareholder earnings, congressional battles, and student debt disasters. The relatable human stories in Lower Ed—from mothers struggling to pay for beauty school to working class guys seeking "good jobs" to accomplished professionals pursuing doctoral degrees—illustrate that the growth of for-profit colleges is inextricably linked to larger questions of race, gender, work, and the promise of opportunity in America.

Drawing on more than one hundred interviews with students, employees, executives, and activists, Lower Ed tells the story of the benefits, pitfalls, and real costs of a for-profit education. It is a story about broken social contracts; about education transforming from a public interest to a private gain; and about all Americans and the challenges we face in our divided, unequal society.


Click for more detail about Birth of a Dream Weaver: A Writer’s Awakening by Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o Birth of a Dream Weaver: A Writer’s Awakening

by Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o
The New Press (Oct 04, 2016)
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One of Oprah.com’s "17 Must-Read Books for the New Year" and O Magazine’s "10 Titles to Pick up Now."

?Exquisite in its honesty and truth and resilience, and a necessary chronicle from one of the greatest writers of our time. ”
?Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, The Guardian, Best Books of 2016.

?Every page ripples with a contagious faith in education and in the power of literature to shape the imagination and scour the conscience.”
?The Washington Post

From one of the world’s greatest writers, the story of how the author found his voice as a novelist at Makerere University in Uganda Birth of a Dream Weaver charts the very beginnings of a writer’s creative output. In this wonderful memoir, Kenyan writer Ng?g? wa Thiong’o recounts the four years he spent at Makerere University in Kampala, Uganda—threshold years during which he found his voice as a journalist, short story writer, playwright, and novelist just as colonial empires were crumbling and new nations were being born—under the shadow of the rivalries, intrigues, and assassinations of the Cold War. Haunted by the memories of the carnage and mass incarceration carried out by the British colonial-settler state in his native Kenya but inspired by the titanic struggle against it, Ng?g?, then known as James Ngugi, begins to weave stories from the fibers of memory, history, and a shockingly vibrant and turbulent present. What unfolds in this moving and thought-provoking memoir is simultaneously the birth of one of the most important living writers—lauded for his “epic imagination” (Los Angeles Times)—the death of one of the most violent episodes in global history, and the emergence of new histories and nations with uncertain futures.


Click for more detail about Black Power 50 by Sylviane A. Diouf and Komozi Woodward Black Power 50

by Sylviane A. Diouf and Komozi Woodward
The New Press (Sep 06, 2016)
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Black Power burst onto the world scene in 1966 with ideas, politics, and fashion that opened the eyes of millions of people across the globe. In the United States, the movement spread like wildfire: high school and college youth organized black student unions; educators created black studies programs; Black Power conventions gathered thousands of people from all walks of life; and books, journals, bookstores, and publishing companies spread Black Power messages and imagery throughout the country and abroad.The Black Arts Movement inspired the creation of some eight hundred black theaters and cultural centers, where a generation of writers and artists forged a new and enduring cultural vision.Black Power 50 includes original interviews with key figures from the movement, essays from today’s leading Black Power scholars, and over one hundred stunning images, offering a beautiful and compelling introduction to this pivotal movement.


Click for more detail about Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools by Monique W. Morris Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools

by Monique W. Morris
The New Press (Mar 29, 2016)
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“A powerful indictment of the cultural beliefs, policies, and practices that criminalize and dehumanize Black girls in America, coupled with thoughtful analysis and critique of the justice work that must be done at the intersection of race and gender.” —Michelle Alexander, author of The New Jim Crow

Pushout: The Criminalization of Black Girls in Schools is a discussion about the experiences of Black girls across the country whose intricate lives are misunderstood, highly judged—by teachers, administrators, and the justice system—and degraded by the very institutions charged with helping them flourish. This book shows how, despite obstacles, stigmas, stereotypes, and despair, Black girls still find ways to breathe remarkable dignity into their lives in classrooms, juvenile facilities, and beyond.


Click for more detail about The Lights of Pointe-Noire: A Memoir by Alain Mabanckou The Lights of Pointe-Noire: A Memoir

by Alain Mabanckou
The New Press (Mar 01, 2016)
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Alain Mabanckou left Congo in 1989, at the age of twenty-two, not to return until a quarter of a century later. When he finally came back to Pointe-Noire, a bustling port town on Congo’s southeastern coast, he found a country that in some ways had changed beyond recognition: the cinema where, as a child, Mabanckou gorged on glamorous American culture had become a Pentecostal temple, and his secondary school has been renamed in honor of a previously despised colonial ruler.

But many things remain unchanged, not least the swirling mythology of Congolese culture that still informs everyday life in Pointe-Noire. Now a decorated writer and an esteemed professor at UCLA, Mabanckou finds he can only look on as an outsider in the place where he grew up. As he delves into his childhood, into the life of his departed mother, and into the strange mix of belonging and absence that informs his return to Congo, his work recalls the writing of V.S. Naipaul and André Aciman, offering a startlingly fresh perspective on the pain of exile, the ghosts of memory, and the paths we take back home.


Click for more detail about Hold Tight Gently: Michael Callen, Essex Hemphill, And The Battlefield Of Aids by Martin Duberman Hold Tight Gently: Michael Callen, Essex Hemphill, And The Battlefield Of Aids

by Martin Duberman
The New Press (Mar 18, 2014)
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In December 1995, the FDA approved the release of protease inhibitors, the first effective treatment for AIDS. For countless people, the drug offered a reprieve from what had been a death sentence; for others, it was too late. In the United States alone, over 318,000 people had already died from AIDS-related complications?among them the singer Michael Callen and the poet Essex Hemphill.

Meticulously researched and evocatively told, Hold Tight Gently is the celebrated historian Martin Duberman’s poignant memorial to those lost to AIDS and to two of the great unsung heroes of the early years of the epidemic.
Callen, a white gay Midwesterner who had moved to New York, became a leading figure in the movement to increase awareness of AIDS in the face of willful and homophobic denial under the Reagan administration; Hemphill, an African American gay man, contributed to the black gay and lesbian scene in Washington, D.C., with poetry of searing intensity and introspection.

A profound exploration of the intersection of race, sexuality, class, identity, and the politics of AIDS activism beyond ACT UP, Hold Tight Gently captures both a generation struggling to cope with the deadly disease and the extraordinary refusal of two men to give in to despair.


Click for more detail about Black Stats: African Americans by the Numbers in the Twenty-first Century by Monique W. Morris Black Stats: African Americans by the Numbers in the Twenty-first Century

by Monique W. Morris
The New Press (Jan 28, 2014)
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Black Stats—a comprehensive guide filled with contemporary facts and figures on African Americans—is an essential reference for anyone attempting to fathom the complex state of our nation. With fascinating and often surprising information on everything from incarceration rates, lending practices, and the arts to marriage, voting habits, and green jobs, the contextualized material in this book will better attune readers to telling trends while challenging commonly held, yet often misguided, perceptions.

A compilation that at once highlights measures of incredible progress and enumerates the disparate impacts of social policies and practices, this book is a critical tool for advocates, educators, and policy makers. Black Stats offers indispensable information that is sure to enlighten discussions and provoke debates about the quality of Black life in the United States today—and help chart the path to a better future.

There are less than a quarter-million Black public school teachers in the U.S.—representing just 7 percent of all teachers in public schools.

Approximately half of the Black population in the United States lives in neighborhoods that have no White residents. In the five years before the Great Recession, the number of Black-owned businesses in the United States increased by 61 percent.

A 2010 study found that 41 percent of Black youth feel that rap music videos should be more political. There are no Black owners or presidents of an NFL franchise team. 78 percent of Black Americans live within 30 miles of a coal-fired power plant, compared with 56 percent of White Americans.


Click for more detail about The Cushion In The Road: Meditation And Wandering As The Whole World Awakens To Being In Harm’s Way by Alice Walker The Cushion In The Road: Meditation And Wandering As The Whole World Awakens To Being In Harm’s Way

by Alice Walker
The New Press (Apr 09, 2013)
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This gorgeous collection gathers Alice Walker’s wide-ranging meditations?many of them previously unpublished?on our intertwined personal, spiritual, and political destinies. For the millions of her devoted fans, and for readers of Walker’s bestselling 2006 book, We Are the Ones We Have Been Waiting For, here is a brand new "gift of words" that invites readers on a journey of political awakening and spiritual insight.

The Cushion in the Road finds the Pulitzer Prize?winning novelist, poet, essayist, and activist at the height of her literary powers, sharing fresh vantages and a deepening engagement with our world. Walker writes that "we are beyond a rigid category of color, sex, or spirituality if we are truly alive," and the pieces in The Cushion in the Road illustrate this idea beautifully. Visiting themes she has addressed throughout her career?including racism, Africa, Palestinian solidarity, and Cuba?as well as addressing emergent issues, such as the presidency of Barack Obama on health care, Walker explores her conflicting impulses to retreat into inner contemplation and to remain deeply engaged with the world.

Rich with humor and wisdom, and informed by Walker’s unique eye for the details of human and natural experience, The Cushion in the Road will please longtime Walker fans as well as those who are new to her work.


Click for more detail about The World Will Follow Joy: Turning Madness Into Flowers (New Poems) by Alice Walker The World Will Follow Joy: Turning Madness Into Flowers (New Poems)

by Alice Walker
The New Press (Apr 02, 2013)
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"Poetry is leading us," writes Alice Walker in The World Will Follow Joy. In this dazzling collection, the beloved writer offers over sixty new poems to incite and nurture contemporary activists. Hailed as a ?lavishly gifted writer” (The New York Times), Walker imbues her poetry with evocative images, fresh language, anger, forgiveness, and profound wisdom. Casting her poetic eye toward history, politics, and nature, as well as to world figures such as Jimmy Carter, Gloria Steinem, and the Dalai Lama, she is indeed a "muse for our times" (Amy Goodman).

By attentively chronicling the conditions of human life today, Walker shows, as ever, her deep compassion, profound spirituality, and necessary political commitments. The poems in The World Will Follow Joy remind us of our human capacity to come together and take action, even in our troubled political times. Above all, the gems in this collection illuminate what it means to live in our world today.


Click for more detail about The World Has Changed: Conversations with Alice Walker by Alice Walker The World Has Changed: Conversations with Alice Walker

by Alice Walker
The New Press (Nov 08, 2011)
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Published to stellar praise, The World Has Changed boasts revelatory conversations between Walker and other literary and cultural icons—including Howard Zinn, Pema Chödrön, Claudia Tate, Margo Jefferson, William R. Ferris, and Paula Giddings—and illuminates the heart and mind of one of the world’s most celebrated living writers. Carefully framed and contextualized through an introduction by literary scholar Rudolph P. Byrd, the book also includes a thorough chronology of Walker’s life and work.

The World Has Changed is a delightful addition to the Alice Walker canon that will thrill and engage readers for years to come.

Book Review

Click for more detail about Color Me English: Migration And Belonging Before And After 9/11 by Caryl Phillips Color Me English: Migration And Belonging Before And After 9/11

by Caryl Phillips
The New Press (Aug 09, 2011)
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Born in St. Kitts and brought up in the UK, bestselling author Caryl Phillips has written about and explored the experience of migration for more than thirty years through his spellbinding and award-winning novels, plays, and essays.

Now, in a magnificent and beautifully written new book, Phillips reflects on the shifting notions of race, culture, and belonging before and after the September 11 attacks on the World Trade Center.

Color Me English opens with an inspired story from his boyhood, a poignant account of a shared sense of isolation he felt with the first Muslim boy who joined his school. Phillips then turns to his years living and teaching in the United States, including a moving account of the day the twin towers fell. We follow him across Europe and through Africa while he grapples with making sense of colonial histories and contemporary migrations—engaging with legendary African, African American, and international writers from James Baldwin and Richard Wright to Chinua Achebe and Ha Jin who have aspired to see themselves and their own societies more clearly.

A truly transnational reflection on race and culture in a post-9/11 world, Color Me English is a stunning collection of writing that is at once timeless and urgent.


Click for more detail about Fatal Invention: How Science, Politics, And Big Business Re-Create Race In The Twenty-First Century by Dorothy Roberts Fatal Invention: How Science, Politics, And Big Business Re-Create Race In The Twenty-First Century

by Dorothy Roberts
The New Press (Jul 05, 2011)
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A decade after the Human Genome Project proved that human beings are not naturally divided by race, the emerging fields of personalized medicine, reproductive technologies, genetic genealogy, and DNA databanks are attempting to resuscitate race as a biological category written in our genes. In this provocative analysis, leading legal scholar and social critic Dorothy Roberts argues that America is once again at the brink of a virulent outbreak of classifying population by race. By searching for differences at the molecular level, a new race-based science is obscuring racism in our society and legitimizing state brutality against communities of color at a time when America claims to be post-racial.

Moving from an account of the evolution of race—proving that it has always been a mutable and socially defined political division supported by mainstream science—Roberts delves deep into the current debates, interrogating the newest science and biotechnology, interviewing its researchers, and exposing the political consequences obscured by the focus on genetic difference. Fatal Invention is a provocative call for us to affirm our common humanity.

Book Review

Click for more detail about 12 Angry Men: True Stories Of Being A Black Man In America Today by Gregory S. Parks and Matthew W. Hughey 12 Angry Men: True Stories Of Being A Black Man In America Today

by Gregory S. Parks and Matthew W. Hughey
The New Press (Jan 11, 2011)
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Called a book that "is factual yet reads like a novel" on the Huffington Post, 12 Angry Men reveals some pointed truths about our nation as a dozen African American authors from across the United States tell their personal stories of being racially profiled.

In this "extraordinarily compelling" (Publishers Weekly) book, we hear tales of injustice from Joe Morgan, a former Major League Baseball MVP; Paul Butler, a federal prosecutor; Kent, a devoted father hauled into central booking for trespassing and loitering when he visits his mother’s housing project; Solomon Moore, a former criminal justice reporter for the New York Times; and King Downing, a former head of the ACLU’s racial profiling initiative.

In an era of contentious debate about controversial police practices and, more broadly, the significance of implications of race throughout American life, 12 Angry Men is an urgent, moving, and timely book that exposes "a serious impediment to the collective American Dream of a colorblind society" (Pittsburgh Urban Media).

Book Review

Click for more detail about Say It Loud: Great Speeches On Civil Rights And African American Identity by Catherine Ellis and Stephen Drury Smith Say It Loud: Great Speeches On Civil Rights And African American Identity

by Catherine Ellis and Stephen Drury Smith
The New Press (Aug 31, 2010)
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Say It Loud adds new depth to the oral and audio history of the modern struggle for racial equality and civil rights—focusing directly on the pivotal questions black America grappled with during the past four decades of resistance. With recordings unearthed from libraries and sound archives, and made widely available here for the first time, Say It Loud includes powerful speeches by Malcolm X, Angela Davis, Martin Luther King Jr., James Cone, Toni Morrison, Colin Powell, and many others.

Bringing the rich immediacy of the spoken word to a vital historical and intellectual tradition, Say It Loud illuminates the diversity of ideas and arguments pulsing through the black freedom movement.

Book Review

Click for more detail about Possessing the Secret of Joy: A Novel by Alice Walker Possessing the Secret of Joy: A Novel

by Alice Walker
The New Press (May 06, 2008)
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From the author the New York Times Book Review calls “a lavishly gifted writer,” this is the searing story of Tashi, a tribal African woman first glimpsed in The Color Purple whose fateful decision to submit to the tsunga’s knife and be genitally mutilated leads to a trauma that informs her life and fatefully alters her existence. Possessing the Secret of Joy, out of print for a number of years, was the first novel to deal with this controversial topic and managed to do so in a manner that Cosmopolitan called “masterful, honorable, and unforgettable storytelling.” The New Press is proud to bring the book back into print with a new preface by the author addressing the book’s initial reception and the changed attitudes toward female genital mutilation that have come about in part because of this book.


Click for more detail about We Are the Ones We Have Been Waiting for: Inner Light in a Time of Darkness by Alice Walker We Are the Ones We Have Been Waiting for: Inner Light in a Time of Darkness

by Alice Walker
The New Press (Nov 21, 2007)
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A New York Times bestseller in hardcover, Pulitzer Prize winner Alice Walker’s We Are the Ones We Have Been Waiting For was called “stunningly insightful” and “a book that will inspire hope” by Publishers Weekly.Drawing equally on Walker’s spiritual grounding and her progressive political convictions, each chapter concludes with a recommended meditation to teach us patience, compassion, and forgiveness. We Are the Ones We Have Been Waiting For takes on some of the greatest challenges of our times and in it Walker encourages readers to take faith in the fact that, despite the daunting predicaments we find ourselves in, we are uniquely prepared to create positive change.The hardcover edition of We Are the Ones We Have Been Waiting For included a national tour that saw standing-room-only crowds and standing ovations. Walker’s clear vision and calm meditative voice—truly “a light in darkness”—has struck a deep chord among a large and devoted readership.


Click for more detail about Harlem on My Mind: Cultural Capital of Black America, 1900-1968 by Allon Schoener Harlem on My Mind: Cultural Capital of Black America, 1900-1968

by Allon Schoener
The New Press (Oct 30, 2007)
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Long before Harlem became one of the trendiest neighborhoods in the red-hot real estate market of Manhattan, it was a metaphor for African American culture at its richest. Allon Schoener’s celebrated Harlem on My Mind is the classic record of Harlem life during some of the most exciting and turbulent years of its history, a beautiful—and poignant—reminder of a powerful moment in African America history.

Including the work of some of Harlem’s most treasured photographers, among them James Van Der Zee and Gordon Parks, there are photographs of Harlem’s literary lights—Langston Hughes, Countee Cullen, and Richard Wright; its politicians—Marcus Garvey, Malcolm X, and Adam Clayton Powell Jr.; and its musicians—Ethel Waters, Duke Ellington, and Billie Holiday. The book also includes the photographs of the everyday folk who gave life to this legendary community.

These extraordinary images are juxtaposed with articles from publications such as the New York Times and the Amsterdam News, which have helped to record the life of one of New York’s most memorialized neighborhoods.

Originally published in 1969 as the catalogue to the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s controversial exhibition of the same name, Harlem on My Mind is as compelling today as it was when first published.


"In Harlem on My Mind one witnesses it all—the joys, sorrows, and triumphs of this mecca of black achievement. Along with the visual excitement are fascinating articles that reveal Harlem as it was in the early 1900s, as it is today, and what one might expect from it in the future. It is an important contribution, not only to the history of Harlem, but to the history of America." —Gordon Parks

"Harlem on My Mind represents months and years of research that would be impossible to duplicate today. It should be considered a history of the times; it is important for the present generation and coming generations. . . . No household, school, or library should be without it." —James Van Der Zee


Click for more detail about After the Storm: Black Intellectuals Explore the Meaning of Hurricane Katrina by David Dante Troutt After the Storm: Black Intellectuals Explore the Meaning of Hurricane Katrina

by David Dante Troutt
The New Press (Sep 30, 2007)
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Now in paperback on the second anniversary of Katrina, one of the few books to offer the perspectives of African Americans on the Gulf Goast tragedy.

Available for the first time in paperback after selling out its hardcover print run and being frequently named among the best of the Katrina books, After the Storm offers "angry, learned, focused, readable, [and] essential" writing, according to Library Journal, in which contributors face what Ebony magazine calls "questions about poverty, housing, governmental decision-making, crime, community development and political participation, which were raised in the aftermath of the storm."

Featuring the work of leading African American intellectuals, including Derrick Bell, Charles Ogletree, Michael Eric Dyson, Cheryl Harris, Devon Carbado, Adolph Reed, Sheryll Cashin, and Clement Alexander Price, After the Storm suggests "precisely what we must do if we are to both save the planet and create the great towns and cities that we can proudly bequeath to future generations" (Socialist Review).


Click for more detail about We Are the Ones We Have Been Waiting for: Inner Light in a Time of Darkness by Alice Walker We Are the Ones We Have Been Waiting for: Inner Light in a Time of Darkness

by Alice Walker
The New Press (Oct 30, 2006)
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A New York Times bestseller in hardcover, Pulitzer Prize winner Alice Walker’s We Are the Ones We Have Been Waiting For was called ?stunningly insightful” and ?a book that will inspire hope” by Publishers Weekly.

Drawing equally on Walker’s spiritual grounding and her progressive political convictions, each chapter concludes with a recommended meditation to teach us patience, compassion, and forgiveness. We Are the Ones We Have Been Waiting For takes on some of the greatest challenges of our times and in it Walker encourages readers to take faith in the fact that, despite the daunting predicaments we find ourselves in, we are uniquely prepared to create positive change.

The hardcover edition of We Are the Ones We Have Been Waiting For included a national tour that saw standing-room?only crowds and standing ovations. Walker’s clear vision and calm meditative voice—truly "a light in darkness"—has struck a deep chord among a large and devoted readership.


Click for more detail about Slavery in New York by Ira Berlin Slavery in New York

by Ira Berlin
The New Press (Oct 01, 2005)
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In 1986 the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology at Harvard mounted From Site to Sight, a groundbreaking traveling exhibition on the historic and contemporary uses of photography in anthropology. Using visual materials from the vast photographic archives of the Peabody Museum and the work of members of Harvard’s anthropology department, the accompanying catalog investigates how anthropologists have employed the camera as a recording and analytic tool and as an aesthetic medium.

Photographs ranging from daguerreotypes to satellite images are presented in an examination of the possibilities and limitations of using the camera as a fact-gathering and interpretive tool. The authors also explore the broader implications of the uses—and misuses—of visual imagery within the human sciences.

From Site to Sight has been a foundational text for scholars and students in the developing field of visual anthropology, illustrating the role of photographic imagery in anthropology and archaeology from the disciplines’ formative years to the 1980s. Long out of print, this classic publication is now available in an enhanced thirtieth anniversary edition with a new introductory essay by Ira Jacknis.


Click for more detail about Sundown Towns by James W. Loewen Sundown Towns

by James W. Loewen
The New Press (Sep 29, 2005)
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Now available in paperback.

The explosive story of racial exclusion in the north, from the American Book Award-winning author of Lies My Teacher Told Me

As American as apple pie:
• Most suburbs in the United States were originally sundown towns.
• As part of the deepening racism that swept through the United States after 1890, town after town outside the traditional South became intentionally all-white, evicting their black populations with tactics that ranged from intimidation to outright violence.
• From Myakka City, Florida, to Kennewick, Washington, the nation is dotted with thousands of all-white towns that are (or were until recently) all-white on purpose. Sundown towns can be found in almost every state.

"Don’t let the sun go down on you in this town." We equate these words with the Jim Crow South but, in a sweeping analysis of American residential patterns, award-winning and bestselling author James W. Loewen demonstrates that strict racial exclusion was the norm in American towns and villages from sea to shining sea for much of the twentieth century.

Weaving history, personal narrative, and hard-nosed analysis, Loewen shows that the sundown town was—and is—an American institution with a powerful and disturbing history of its own, told here for the first time. In Michigan, Indiana, Ohio, Illinois, Missouri, Pennsylvania, and elsewhere, sundown towns were created in waves of violence in the early decades of the twentieth century, and then maintained well into the contemporary era.

Sundown Towns redraws the map of race relations, extending the lines of racial oppression through the backyard of millions of Americans—and lobbing an intellectual hand grenade into the debates over race and racism today.


Click for more detail about Islam Explained by Tahar Ben Jelloun Islam Explained

by Tahar Ben Jelloun
The New Press (Apr 24, 2004)
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In an accessible question-and-answer format, Islam Explained clarifies the main tenets of Islam, the major landmarks in Islamic history, and the current politics of Islamic fundamentalism. The book also sheds light on the key words that have come to dominate the media—terrorist, crusade, jihad, fundamentalist, fatwa—offering lucid and balanced explanations, not only for youngsters but also for the general reader.Islam Explained is at once an essential introduction to one of the world’s great religions and a cry for tolerance and understanding in deeply troubled times.


Click for more detail about This Blinding Absence of Light: A Novel by Tahar Ben Jelloun This Blinding Absence of Light: A Novel

by Tahar Ben Jelloun
The New Press (May 01, 2002)
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An immediate and critically acclaimed bestseller in France and winner of the 2004 International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award, This Blinding Absence of Light is the latest work by Tahar Ben Jelloun, the first North African winner of the Prix Goncourt and winner of the 1994 Prix Mahgreb. Ben Jelloun crafts a horrific real-life narrative into fiction to tell the appalling story of the desert concentration camps in which King Hassan II of Morocco held his political enemies under the most harrowing conditions. Not until September 1991, under international pressure, was Hassan’s regime forced to open these desert hellholes. A handful of survivors—living cadavers who had shrunk by over a foot in height—emerged from the six-by-three-foot cells in which they had been held underground for decades.Working closely with one of the survivors, Ben Jelloun eschewed the traditional novel format and wrote a book in the simplest of language, reaching always for the most basic of words, the most correct descriptions. The result is a shocking novel that explores both the limitlessness of inhumanity and the impossible endurance of the human will.


Click for more detail about One Hundred Jobs: A Panorama of Work in the American City by Ron Howell One Hundred Jobs: A Panorama of Work in the American City

by Ron Howell
The New Press (Mar 01, 2000)
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Using New York City as a microcosm of the American economy, One Hundred Jobs paints an original and revealing portrait of work in all its differences and extremes. Veteran journalist Ron Howell has interviewed one hundred workers to find out what they do all day, how they do it, how they are compensated, and how they view their working lives. These portraits are accompanied by statistics such as salary, health care benefits, average hours of work per week, and educational background, along with Pulitzer Prize winner Ozier Muhammad’s photographs of each employee at his or her job site.From locksmith to landlord, dermatologist to magician, hair braider to World Wide Web coordinator, the profiles in One Hundred Jobs demonstrate the remarkable diversity of American workers today, highlighting the differences in expectation and experience across the employment spectrum.


Click for more detail about Racism Explained to My Daughter by Tahar Ben Jelloun Racism Explained to My Daughter

by Tahar Ben Jelloun
The New Press (Jun 01, 1999)
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In the tradition of Marion Wright Edelman’s The Measure of Our Success, a bestselling author speaks frankly with his daughter about racism.


Click for more detail about The Monkey Suit: And Other Short Fiction on African Americans and Justice by David Dante Troutt The Monkey Suit: And Other Short Fiction on African Americans and Justice

by David Dante Troutt
The New Press (Apr 01, 1999)
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The Monkey Suit is David Dante Troutt’s “impressive” debut (Kirkus), a collection of short stories inspired by historic legal cases involving African Americans in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The Monkey Suit addresses issues ranging from Jim Crow segregation ordinances to warrantless private property searches in stories the Washington Post calls “quietly devastating.” Troutt brilliantly combines legal scholarship with literature in a book that Claude Brown calls “truly a work of genius.”


Click for more detail about Black Popular Culture (Discussions in Contemporary Culture) by Michele Wallace Black Popular Culture (Discussions in Contemporary Culture)

by Michele Wallace
The New Press (Sep 01, 1998)
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A Village Voice Best Book "spirited debate among African American artists and cultural critics about issues from essentialism to sexuality"


Click for more detail about Corruption by Tahar Ben Jelloun Corruption

by Tahar Ben Jelloun
The New Press (Nov 01, 1996)
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Casablanca and Tangier provide the backdrops for Corruption, and erotic tale of morality about Mourad, the last honest man in Morocco. After a lifetime of resistance, Mourad finally gives in to the demands of his materialistic wife and accepts “commissions” for his work: just one envelope stuffed with cash, then another. Ben Jelloun’s compelling novel evokes the dangers of succumbing to the daily temptations of modern life, as Mourad lives the consequences of betraying his existence.


Click for more detail about Corruption (International Fiction) by Tahar Ben Jelloun Corruption (International Fiction)

by Tahar Ben Jelloun
The New Press (Oct 01, 1995)
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Much to the chagrin of his boss, wife, and colleagues, scrupulously moral Mourad refuses to accept "commissions" for his work, until overwhelming pressures make him give in, with disastrous results.


Click for more detail about Words of Fire: An Anthology of African-American Feminist Thought by Beverly Guy-Sheftall Words of Fire: An Anthology of African-American Feminist Thought

by Beverly Guy-Sheftall
The New Press (Sep 01, 1995)
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The first major anthology to trace the development, from the early 1800s to the present, of black feminist thought in the United States, Words of Fire is Beverly Guy-Sheftall’s comprehensive collection of writings, in the feminist tradition, of more than sixty African American women. From the pioneering work of abolitionist Maria Miller Stewart and anti-lynching crusader Ida Wells-Barnett to the writings of contemporary feminist critics Michele Wallace and bell hooks, black women have been writing about the multiple jeopardies—racism, sexism, and classicm—that have made it imperative for them to forge a brand of feminism uniquely their own.


List of Contributors: Margaret Walker Alexander Sadie Tanner Mosell Alexander Frances Beale Shirley Chisholm Cheryl Clarke Pearl Cleage Johnnetta B. Cole Patricia Hill Collins The Combahee River Collective Anna Julia Cooper Angela Davis Alice Dunbar-Nelson Julia A.J. Foote Amy Jacques Garvey Paula Giddings Jacquelyn Grant Patricia Haden Evelynn Hammonds Lorraine Hansberry Frances Ellen Watkins Harper Elizabeth Higginbotham Darlene Clark Hine bell hooks Claudia Jones June Jordan Gloria Joseph Florynce "Flo" Kennedy Deborah K. King Linda La Rue Audre Lorde Tracye Matthews Elise Johnson McDougald Donna Middleton Gertrude Bustill Mossell Pauli Murray Barbara Omolade Barbara Ransby Beth E. Richie Patricia Robinson Barbara Smith Maria Miller Stewart Ula Taylor Mary Church Terrell Pauline Terrelonge Sojourner Truth Alice Walker Michele Wallace Mary Ann Weathers Ida Wells-Barnett E. Frances White Margaret Wilkerson



Click for more detail about Art on My Mind: Visual Politics by bell hooks Art on My Mind: Visual Politics

by bell hooks
The New Press (Jul 01, 1995)
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In Art on My Mind, bell hooks, a leading cultural critic, responds to the ongoing dialogues about producing, exhibiting, and criticizing art and aesthetics in an art world increasingly concerned with identity politics. Always concerned with the liberatory black struggle, hooks positions her writings on visual politics within the ever-present question of how art can be an empowering and revolutionary force within the black community.


Click for more detail about Up South: Stories, Studies, and Letters of African American Migrations by Malaika Adero Up South: Stories, Studies, and Letters of African American Migrations

by Malaika Adero
The New Press (Apr 01, 1994)
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Perhaps the greatest migration in America’s history is the early twentieth-century movement of African Americans from the southern states to the urban Northeast and Midwest. For the first time ever, Up South captures the totality of this pivotal black experience in a single volume. Including photographs, letters, and turn-of-the-century items in the Chicago Defender, Crisis, and Opportunity, as well as writing by Zora Neale Hurston, James Weldon Johnson, Ralph Ellison, Richard Wright, Arna Bontemps, Mary McLeod Bethune, and W.E.B. Du Bois, Up South is a moving and eye-opening anthology of African American literature, scholarship, and journalism from the first half of this century.


Click for more detail about Daughters of the Dust: The Making of an African American Woman’s Film by Julie Dash Daughters of the Dust: The Making of an African American Woman’s Film

by Julie Dash
The New Press (Nov 01, 1992)
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In the winter of 1992, nearly one hundred years after motion pictures were invented, the first nationally distributed feature by an African American woman was released in the United States. The film tells the story of an African American sea-island family preparing to come to the mainland at the turn of the century. In her richly textured, highly visual, lyrical portrayal of the day of the departure, Julie Dash evokes the details of a persisting African culture and the tensions between tradition and assimilation. Daughters of the Dust: The Making of an African American Woman’s Film, which includes Dash’s complete screenplay, describes the story of her extraordinary sixteen-year struggle to complete the project.

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Click for more detail about Slaves Without Masters (Revised) by Ira Berlin Slaves Without Masters (Revised)

by Ira Berlin
The New Press (Oct 01, 1992)
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A history of a million free blacks who lived in the South before the American Civil War. The text traces the lives of free black men and women, portraying their struggle for community, liberty, economic independence, and education within an oppressive society.



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